May 01, 2017

Remembering 1997-1998: Wrap-Up

Most of us are familiar with the annual Beloit College Mindset List. If you’ve missed it, take a look here. The list explores the “cultural touchstones that shape the lives of students about to enter college.”

When I saw the list for the Class of 2020 last fall, I was amused and appalled by some of the highlights:
“There has always been a digital swap meet called eBay.
The United States has always been at war.
They have never seen billboard ads for cigarettes.”

In a seemingly unconnected occurrence, the CWRU Archives had recently begun digitizing our student newspapers. The Mindset List looks at the entire 18 years of our new students’ lives. I wondered what was happening on CWRU’s campus during the year our freshmen were born. Exploring campus life from the point of view of the students of 1998 for the Class of 2020 seemed like a small, but friendly, welcoming gesture to our new students. It was also an opportunity to use our blog to make those digital newspapers more accessible.

That was the start of the Remembering 1997-1998 project. The 26 issues of the 1997/98 Observer were posted each week, along with a very short summary of some of the headlines. I tried to avoid interpreting, letting the newspapers speak for themselves, but selecting headlines is not a neutral act.

The project ended last week with the April 24, 1998 issue, so I feel free to opine a bit. First and foremost, looking at this year of The Observer gave me a new respect for the work of our student journalists. This not very large group manages to cover an impressively broad range of events and issues on campus.

The most obvious changes between 1997/98 and 2016/17 are technology. Among the innovations announced in 1997/98 were a new “electronic suggestion box.” An ad for an Apple Power Macintosh 6500 for $3,015 appeared. And the editors called for implementation of computerized registration.

A number of events from nineteen years ago could have come from today’s headlines: a benefit to protest police brutality, rape and a “Come Because You Care” candlelight vigil, allegations of racially derotagory and anti-gay chalk markings, efforts to reduce alcohol abuse, an invitation to sign a statement affirming “our commitment to a campus community that supports the worth and dignity of each individual,” and student debt and money management tips.

Some of 1997/98’s firsts included a new alma mater, formation of the Weatherhead Entrepreneurs Society to market student inventions, and SpringFest.

Traditions included WRUW’s diverse programming, changes to the physical campus, the 25th Ebony Ball, Humanities Week events, Winter Carnival, Martin Luther King, Jr. Day Convocation, Mr. CWRU Contest, Engineers’ Week, and the April Fool’s Day special edition.

Celebrations of our array of international cultures included Indian Independence, Hispanic Heritage Month, Turkish Deserts Night, and Gobble, Gobble’s international cuisine for Thanksgiving dinner.

Coincidentally, as the project was wrapping up, we received a request to determine how the name of The Observer was chosen. Not suprisingly, there was a contest.

The first issue of The Observer was published September 5, 1969. Its predecessor, the Reserve Tribune, announced in its April 29, 1969 issue that there would be a contest to name the new newspaper. Judges were the new editorial board and the prize was a Polaroid Swinger Color-Pac camera.

The results of the contest were announced in the May 23, 1969 issue of the Reserve Tribune. George O. Siekkinen submitted the winning entry, The University Observer. The editors decided to shorten the name to The Observer. They wanted a name that was short and a "traditional newspaper name."

We’re continuing our project to digitize our student newspapers, starting with The Observer, Case Tech, and Reserve Tribune. They will, in the fullness of time, join our other Digital Case collections:
images
student yearbooks
commencement

jmt3 at 12:58 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

April 26, 2017

Remembering 1997-1998: April 24, 1998

The April 24, 1998 issue was the last Observer for academic year 1997/98. The front page headline was “First place for CWRU Alma Contest results in tie”

Observer_1998-04-24_p3b.jpg Observer_1998-04-24_p3a.jpg

Other headlines included:
• U.S. Treasurer speaks at Golden Key
• WSOM undergraduates win business competition in Seattle
• An early look at class 2002
• Eyes On American Society of Civil Engineers
• First annual SpringFest brings students together
• 1998 recipients of the Graduate Dean’s Instructional Excellence Awards
• Online registration discussed at USG meeting
• A look at TBTB 1998
• Women faculty few, more being hired
• Women’s coalition receives large donation
• Editorial: Our final grades for 1998
• Makin’ it happen: You’ve heard their names, you know they are influential, now read what they have to say
• Stuck in Cleveland this summer? Check out these ways to have tons of fun!
• Mather Dance is booming with creative energy
• Spartans prepare for UAA Championships

And here's the entire issue: The Observer, 4/24/1998

This is one in a series of weekly blog postings describing what was happening at CWRU, as covered by The Observer, during the years many of the Class of 2020 were born.

jmt3 at 01:52 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

April 24, 2017

Carl Wittke and Immigration History

“Every wave of immigrants has contributed to the cultural, social and intellectual growth of our country. Instead of trying to suppress the rich background of resources all groups possess, we should let them make their specific contributions. Americanization is a very slow process which should be left as a natural process.” Carl Wittke

The theme for the 2017 Cleveland Humanities Festival is immigration. In conjunction with that theme, the Archives is highlighting former faculty member, historian, and administrator, Carl F. Wittke - immigration historian.

00909D1-250w.jpg
Carl F. Wittke

Carl Wittke was born 11/13/1892 in Columbus, Ohio. His father was a German immigrant and this influenced Wittke’s work. Carl’s first language at home was German before learning English which he spoke while attending school. He received his B.A. from Ohio State University and his M.A. and Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1914 and 1921. In 1917 he had a son, Carl Francis, with his first wife. He married his second wife, Lillian Nippert, in 1921 and they remained married until his death in 1971.

Wittke served on the faculty of Ohio State 1916-1937, then moved to Oberlin College where he was Professor of History and Dean of the College 1937-1948. He came to Western Reserve University (WRU) in 1948 as Dean of the Graduate School and Professor of History. He also served as Elbert Jay Benton Professor of History and chair of the History Department, 1959-1963. In 1961 he was named Vice President of WRU. Wittke retired in June, 1963.

Wittke was author of 14 books and 80 articles. In 1939 his general history of immigrants, We Who Built America: the Saga of the Immigrant, was published by Prentice-Hall. This book stayed in print for over 20 years until a revised edition was published in 1964 by the WRU Press. He dedicated the book to his father’s memory, the immigrant who left his homeland and made a new life in America. “His deep-seated devotion to the basic ideals of our American life was born of a long and satisfying experience in the land of his choice. Out of such experiences, I venture to believe, the real Epic of America must eventually be written. I have attempted here to do no more than to suggest some of the broader outlines of that epic story. No one realizes better than I how much work remains to be done...” This book was selected for inclusion in the White House Library of Americana.

He also wrote histories which included The Irish in America (1956) and Refugees of Revolution: The German Forty-Eighters in America (1952) as well as articles such as Immigration Policy Prior to World War I, Melting Pot Literature, and German Immigrants and Their Children. Wittke’s scholarly output included History of Canada (1928) and editor of the 6-volume work, The History of the State of Ohio (1944). For 15 years he was editor of the Prentice-Hall history series.

Wittke received numerous awards in the field of history as well as his work for civil liberties. His biography, Against the Current: The Life of Karl Heinzen, won the medal for the best book by an Ohio author in 1945. The Ohio Academy of History honored Wittke with a testimonial dinner praising him for his outstanding work as an author and his contributions to community relations and brotherhood. In 1963 he received the Cleveland Arts Prize for literature. In 1951 he was presented with the Cleveland B’nai B’rith Sol Fetterman Memorial Award for “outstanding achievements in promoting brotherhood and mutual understanding in this community.” In 1956 he received the Brotherhood Award from the National Conference of Christians and Jews. In 1961 the Cleveland Civil Liberties Union bestowed its first annual award to Wittke. In 1963 he was presented the Commander’s Cross of the Order of Merit by the West German consul for his contributions to understanding between the United States and Germany. He also received honorary doctorates from Ohio State University, Denison University, Lawrence College, Marietta College, Fenn College, Lake Erie College.

Among his professional associations, he was a member of the Council of the American Historical Association, Council of the American Association of University Professors chairing the Committee “A” on academic freedom and tenure for 3 years. Wittke served on the Senate of Phi Beta Kappa, was a fellow of the Royal Historical Society, a member of the board of the Ohio Archaeological and Historical Quarterly, and was chair of the Ohio War Records Commission 1941-1947.

In 1964 Carl Wittke was presented with a festschrift published by Augustana College Library entitled In the Trek of the Immigrants, in connection with the annual meetings of the Mississippi Valley Historical Association held April 30-May 2.

Wittke died 5/24/1971. His widow, Lillian, gave the funds for the reconstituted Carl F. Wittke Award for Distinguished Undergraduate Teaching (originally awarded in 1964).

hxy2 at 03:07 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

April 17, 2017

Remembering 1997-1998: April 17, 1998

Among other articles in the April 17, 1998 Observer is this: College Scholars Program’s Tote the Mug campaign celebrated Earth Day by promoting personal beverage containers instead of styrofoam.

Observer_1998-04-17_p3.jpg

Other headlines included:
• Committee raises Dean’s List G.P.A.
• Robotic cockroach finalist in Discovery Magazine awards
• Eyes On Interfaith Student Forum
• Hudson Relay time approaches
• Boehm brings Australian culture to Wade Park
• Editorial: Students need representation
• CD Warehouse in Coventry hits a big note for music stores
• Spikers advance to EIVA quarterfinals
• CWRU hosts Spartan Track Invitational

And here's the entire issue: The Observer, 4/17/1998

This is one in a series of weekly blog postings describing what was happening at CWRU, as covered by The Observer, during the years many of the Class of 2020 were born.

jmt3 at 02:14 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

April 11, 2017

Remembering 1997-1998: April 10, 1998

The week Zeus got loose was the headline of the Observer’s April 10, 1998 coverage of Greek Week.

Observer_1998-04-10_p3.jpg

The Focus section explored the hidden CWRU: Steam tunnels; How CWRUnet works; Where the tuition goes; The story of ARAMARK; What is that thing on topic of Crawford?

Other headlines included:
• Work begins on new science complex
• Rubin receives the Churchill
• Eyes On The CWRU Musical Group
• RHA elects officers for 1998-1999 school year
• Refuge seeks new name with contest
• International extravaganza caters to a sell out crowd
• Two students receive Goldwater scholarship
• The Women’s Studies Intramural Speaker Series presents first student presentation
• Volunteers needed for EARTHFest ‘98
• Editorial: Make transcripts more available to students
• WRUW sponsors local benefit concert
• Pulp’s new album worth a listen
• String Cheese Incident to play at Odeon tonight
• 8th annual Mather scholarship competition announced
• Spikers win third consecutive NCAC title
• Spartans improve season record to 10-4-1

And here's the entire issue: The Observer, 4/10/1998

This is one in a series of weekly blog postings describing what was happening at CWRU, as covered by The Observer, during the years many of the Class of 2020 were born.

jmt3 at 08:49 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

April 03, 2017

Remembering 1997-1998: April 3, 1998

The April 3, 1998 Observer was the first issue under the 1998-1999 staff:

Editor, Christian R. Steiner
Managing Editor, Mark A. Zaremba
News Editor, Tina Wang
Features Editor, Santina Protopapa
Sports Editor, Erin McKeag
Copy Editors, Jennifer Long and Betsy Davis
Photo Editor, Mark Lehmkuhle
Focus Editor, Nick Thorpe
Production Managers, Lipika Samal and Angela Byun
Business Manager, Eric Lin
Advertising Manager, Rick Cruikshank

Observer_1998-04-03_p7.jpg
CWRU professors arrested by Alpha Phi Omega; story on page 7

Other headlines included:
• MOP forecases future computing needs
• No mandatory diversity class says students
• Howe wins Spring Olympics
• Eyes On: CWRU Magic Club
• Rotsky proteges shadow CWRU students for a day
• Spikers look toward EIVA championships
• Individuals pace track teams at Wooster
• Tennis team is alive and kicking in ‘98
• Golfers look forward to upcoming season
• Softball team defeats Defiance College

Observer_1998-04-03-2_p5.jpg
Fifth annual Take Back the Night march and rally; story on page 5

And here's the entire issue: The Observer, 4/3/1998

This is one in a series of weekly blog postings describing what was happening at CWRU, as covered by The Observer, during the years many of the Class of 2020 were born.

jmt3 at 01:07 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

March 30, 2017

Celebrating Women’s History Month - Equal Suffrage League on campus

"Love Me, Love My Vote"
100_0995modified-blogready.jpg


-so reads a valentine taken from the college scrapbook of Helen H. Stevens, class of 1919, who served as president of the Equal Suffrage League in 1917-1918.

The Equal Suffrage Chapter of the College for Women was re-established on the campus in the 1915-1916 academic year. According to sources, it had existed a few years earlier but the Archives could not confirm the date. The chapter was reorganized after Emma Maud Perkins called for a meeting of students interested in equal suffrage.

04782D1blogready2.jpg


Emma Perkins was Woods Professor of Latin. A graduate of Vassar College, she moved to Cleveland in 1879 and taught at Central High School. She came to WRU in 1892 as associate professor of Latin at the College for Women. Her widowed mother, Sarah M. Perkins, was a pioneer women’s suffrage worker and lived with her daughter.

The purpose of the Suffrage League was “to promote equal suffrage sentiment among the college women.” The first two years the chapter built up its membership and held meetings where they studied various phases of the suffrage movement. By the 1917-1918 academic year, membership numbered over 50. The League became an auxiliary to the Cleveland Suffrage Party. They held monthly open meetings. Here is a summary of the League activity for the 1917-1918 year taken from the yearbook:

“In October the successful membership campaign was concluded with a tea in Haydn at which Miss Smith and Oliver Emerson spoke. In November there was conducted a mock campaign at the end of which the college voted for or against the Reynold Bill, which provided for Presidential Suffrage for Ohio women. The pleasing result of the election was 308 for and 13 against the Bill.


04783D1p1.jpg 04783D1p2.jpg
Election voting notice and results

"During the campaign we had the pleasure of hearing, at a series of noon meetings in Haydn, Miss Myers, Professor Arbuthnot, Mr. Moley and Mrs. Roger Perkins. In January the League oversubscribed its pledge to the Cleveland party at a meeting led by Felice Crowl. In February Miss Grace Treat talked on ‘The Question in Washington.’ In April the League conducted one of the monthly sing-outs. The annual meeting and election took place in May.”

After decades of advocacy by countless activists, the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution was ratified 8/18/1920 giving women the right to vote. Our activist women took their new right seriously, forming the League of Women Voters shortly thereafter. The Cleveland League was formed in 1920 and the League of Women Voters chapter at the College for Women was organized in October 1921 by alumna Florence Allen.

We would love to celebrate all women involved in the Equal Suffrage League and have identified the following to date:

Suffrage meeting announcement, 5/22/1919
02501D1blogready.jpg
1915/1916 officers:
Julia Harmon, president
Mildred Merkel, vice-president
Marie Grosse, secretary
Margaret Barker, treasurer
Elsie McGee, Eva Smill, and Myra Thwing, directors.

1916/1917 officers:
Eva Smill, president
Mildred Merkel, vice-president
Margaret Barker, secretary
Margaret Hamilton, Julia Harmon, Grace Evans, directors

1917/1918 officers:
Helen H. Stevens, president
Margaret Barker, vice-president
Jeannette Dall, secretary
Henrietta Gates, treasurer
Christena Myers, Lela Draper, Adelaide Zeile, Ruth Hillyer, directors

See past Women’s History Month posts from 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016.

hxy2 at 05:37 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

March 27, 2017

Remembering 1997-1998: March 27, 1998

Observer_1998-03-27_Absurder.jpg

The March 27, 1998 Observer continued the long-standing tradition of an April Fool's special section. The Absurder’s breaking news: “Zaremba declared president of CWRU; Pytte refuses to resign... Neo-Luddites balmed for high tech crime spree... Mutant cockroaches storm Crawford... Survey shows: nerds abound at CWRU...”

More conventional headlines included:
• Krzesinski elected as new USG president
• Steiner elected new editor
• Dodd forms committee on academic ethic policy
• Gurarie fences in NCAA Championships
• Tennis team shocked by division rivals
• Baseball team splits doubleheader against Thiel Tomcats

And here's the entire issue: The Observer, 3/27/1998

This is one in a series of weekly blog postings describing what was happening at CWRU, as covered by The Observer, during the years many of the Class of 2020 were born.

jmt3 at 01:05 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

March 20, 2017

Remembering 1997-1998: March 20, 1998

The March 20, 1998 Observer editorial urged, “Implement online registration soon.” Columnist John D. Giorgus opined, “Current physical education standards are a waste.”

Observer_1998-03-20_p12.jpg
Music critic, Ryan Smith offered his own rating system.

Headlines included:
• Merger may increase train traffic in UC four-fold
• Residence hall restructuring announced for 1998-1999
• Brooten appointed Dean of Nursing
• Eyes On: Urban Asylum
• Dickerson and Wiechers name Truman finalists
• Senior Week fun planned
• Boogie Benefit to fund renovations
• GE, OSCS, CSU form tutoring program
• Take Back the Night protests violence against women
• Makin’ Music: CWRU students to sing and strum at Spot
• CBS scores hit with new “George & Leo” sitcom
• Shakespeare feast to be served tomorrow night at Harkness Chapel
• Creed’s debut album swings and misses with too much hard rock
• Hessler Street Fair poetry contest announced
• Spartans win UAA Championships
• Baseball team starts season on down note
• CWRU holds First Annual Winter Indoor Ultimate Tourney
• CWRU to leave NCAC and become a full time UAA member

And here's the entire issue: The Observer, 3/20/1998


This is one in a series of weekly blog postings describing what was happening at CWRU, as covered by The Observer, during the years many of the Class of 2020 were born.

jmt3 at 02:32 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

March 17, 2017

CWRU’s First International Students

In 2012 7% of Case Western Reserve University’s first-time, first-year students came from outside the U.S. In 2013, Beijing was the hometown of the most members of the entering undergraduate class. By 2016, international students represented 16% of first-time, first-year students. [1]

As an archivist, my default reaction to these kinds of changes and trends is to wonder about historic antecedents. So I set out to identify the first international student from each of our schools. One of the obstacles is that the university recorded far less data about students in the 19th and early 20th centuries than we do now. That means fewer sources to consult, but less certainty about results. So, the necessary disclaimer is that I am identifying the first documented international student in each of our schools.

Because our first reference priority is responding to user requests, my international student quest has been confined to the occasional slow reference periods. So this search will be an ongoing process with additions to this blog entry as additional students are identified.

Here is what is known so far:

CWRU’s first documented international student was George Hall, from England, who entered Western Reserve College in 1839. He attended either one or two years (sources differ). He did not graduate from WRC, but received his A.B. from Princeton in 1845, according to alumni directories.

Case School of Applied Science’s first documented international student was Shin-ichi Takano, from Tokyo. Mr. Takano appears in the 1897/98 and 1899/1900 student rosters as a graduate student. He is also listed in the Case Differential 1901, the student yearbook for academic year 1899/1900, as one of ten graduate students. He is listed in the 1900 commencement program, receiving the M.S. in chemistry. The title of his thesis is The Chemical Composition of the Japanese Petroleums. Fortunately, the Archives has a copy of this thesis. Unfortunately, Mr. Takano does not appear in Case alumni directories, so we know nothing of his life after he graduated.

Case School of Applied Science’s first documented undergraduate international student was Alexander Maurice Orecchia, from Sao Paulo, Brazil. Mr. Orecchia appears in the 1900/01 and 1901/02 student rosters. He appears in the 1902 Commencement program, receiving the B.S. in electrical engineering. Case students at that time wrote an undergraduate thesis. The title of Mr. Orecchia’s thesis is Influence of Salts in Solution on the Ampere Efficiency of an Electrolytic Cell. The Archives also has a copy of this thesis. Case 1927, 1958, and 1964 alumni directories list Mr. Orecchia as living in Sao Paulo, Brazil.

04774D1.jpg
Alexander Maurice Orecchia, 1902

[1] The class statistics are from Institutional Research's First-Year Class Profile. Information about student hometowns was reported in the August 20, 2013 Case Daily.

jmt3 at 03:17 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

March 10, 2017

World War I - summary of CIT campus activity in 1917

The United States officially entered World War I on 4/6/1917. This galvanized actions at Case School of Applied Science (CSAS) and Western Reserve University.

President Charles S. Howe
02062D1.jpg

In the CSAS President’s Annual Report for 1916/1917, President Charles Howe wrote:

“For some time previous to the declaration of the war there had been a great deal of interest among our students in military matters but it had not crystallized into any being. the National Defence Act [sic] of June 1916 made it possible for students in college to form voluntary organizations and for the government to send military officers to institutions where such organizations existed. Engineering students are always very busy with their college work. The demands upon them during the four years of undergraduate life are very much more severe than upon the students in academic colleges. It is, therefore, not surprising that only a few students were willing to take upon themselves work that was not required. After this situation had been explained to the Board [of trustees] a committee was appointed, consisting of two members of the Board and the president of the faculty [Howe]. The committee was asked to thoroughly investigate the question of military drill and the establishment of such military drill as a requirement in Case. The committee had several meeting one with the Secretary of War in Cleveland and another with him in Washington, the latter at his invitation.

“An effort was made to have a military unit established but it was not successful because the number of officers in the army was limited and all of them were needed in the new army about to be raised. We were, therefore, informed that our application was on file - that it would receive consideration just as soon as it seemed possible to supply an officer but that until that time nothing could be done. The committee also endeavored to find out whether it would be possible for us, with our engineering and scientific equipment, to train men as officers for particular scientific departments of the army, or rather, departments where engineering skill is especially needed, as, for instance, in the engineer corps, the ordnance department, the signal corps, etc. Our suggestions were very coldly received by the heads of bureaus but seemed to please the Secretary of War very much. He could, not, however, force the heads of bureaus to attempt work of this kind without their hearty consent and so we have never offered the use of our laboratories to the government.

“As a result of the work of this committee the Trustees, on March 3rd voted that military drill be made compulsory in Case School of Applied Science in accordance with the terms of the National Defense Act of June 1916, and that such drill begin at the opening of the college year 1917-18. It was also voted to increase the length of the college year by one week in order to partially make up for the time which would be taken from studies by the military exercises. Previous to this time, however, military marching had been taken up in the gymnasium as a substitute for gymnasium work. This was carried on under the direction of Professor Adamson who was a captain in the Reserve Corps and by the gymnasium instructors who very willingly took the necessary time to acquaint themselves with the drill manual. At first this work was merely called military marching but as soon as the trustees had taken formal action its title was changed to military drill. The Cleveland Grays kindly loaned us a hundred rifles which they were not using and we secured the services of Captain Lynn, the Adjutant of the Fifth Regiment, Ohio Infantry, as the military instructor. There was little if any objection on the part of the students, even after drill was given for two, three and four hours a day.

04009D1.jpg
Student Army Training Corps drilling, 1917-1918

“As soon as war was declared and the government had determined to establish officers’ training camps in various sections of the county [sic], the college work was badly disorganized. The greatest excitement prevailed. Almost every student in college wanted to go to the camps and my office was besieged from morning until night by the men who wished to secure recommendations. Of course many of the students were too young to be allowed to enter the training camps but in the upper classes the majority of them were over twenty-one and hence were eligible. A comparatively small number of seniors applied for admission to the camps because they hoped to be admitted to the engineering department of the army. About sixty of the students were appointed to the training camps, the number being about equally divided among the senior, junior, and sophomore classes, although three or four freshmen were admitted. One of the freshmen received the highest rank given to a Case man at the conclusion of the first training camp and is now adjutant of his regiment.

“The training camps were not the only opportunities for college men, and various other military activities were open to them, and the call from some of which seemed to be irresistible. Some entered the aviation corps, some went into the mosquito fleet, some became wireless operators, several went to France with the ambulance corps, and one or two took up Y.M.C.A. work with the army.

“Then came the call to the farm. Although we are situated in a large city some of our students come from the country and there was a very great demand on the part of their fathers to have them go home as soon as possible to assist in the farm work. In other cases young men thought that the farm offered them their best field for service. The faculty, therefore, agreed to excuse on the first of May, all of those who could get positions on farms and to give them credit for the balance of the year’s work if they continued the farm work until September first. About thirty students took advantage of this ruling of the faculty and left college on approximately May first.

“Several of the faculty left before the end of the college year, taking advantage of the action of the Trustees whereby they were given leave of absence during the period of the war and continued under fully salary until such time as the government would provide pay for men in the department which they wished to enter.”

Read WRU President Thwing's summary.

hxy2 at 01:23 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

March 06, 2017

Remembering 1997-1998: March 6, 1998

The March 6, 1998 issue of The Observer announced its contest to predict the Oscar winners. Nominees for Best Picture were Titanic, Good Will Hunting, L.A. Confidential, As Good as it Gets

Observer_1998-03-06_p11.jpg

Other Headlines:
• Pytte to retire in 1999
• Neff discusses CWRUnet at open forum
• Eyes On: Peer Helpers
• Students prepare for competition in Malta
• Eustis to lead library
• CEC wraps up week of engineering fun
• Schmiedl tells of her “Personal Memory of King”
• Moonwalkin’ Man: MR CWRU talks about the pageant, his Michael Jackson impression...
• Fencers are undaunted by competition
• Hoopsters drop out in quarterfinals
• Wrestlers compete at regionals
• Spartans to compete in nine-day UAA tournament in Florida
• Tennis team prepares to take on NCAC opponents

And here's the entire issue: The Observer, 3/6/1998

This is one in a series of weekly blog postings describing what was happening at CWRU, as covered by The Observer, during the years many of the Class of 2020 were born.

jmt3 at 01:21 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

February 27, 2017

Remembering 1997-1998: February 27, 1998

The February 27, 1998 issue of The Observer Focus section asked, “What makes a great movie?” The section examined films “which have had a unique impact on today’s releases and culture.”

In other headlines: RHA captures “School of the Year” award

Observer_1998-02-27_p1.jpg


• Network problems plague students on weekends
• Eyes On: Adopt-A-Grandparent
• Students win Seiberling moot court competition
• Medical school alum confirmed as surgeon general
• ACM team competes in international competition
• Recial tensions promote violence in essayist’s world
• Free jazz ensemble to make music in Strosacker Auditorium Tuesday night
• Big Star was the best of “power pop”
• Still not convinces metal music is worth listening to? Read why Six Feet Under makes it well-worth it
• “World’s best” to perform at Harkness Chapel
• Meggitt dreams of order this weekend at Mather
• Wrestlers continue to regional competition
• Men’s basketball closes season on the upside
• Hoopsters eliminated from conference play
• Track teams place third at Baldwin-Wallace
• Men’s volleyball continues to top EIVA
• Hockey club battles for top division spot
• Fencers compete in UAA championships

And here's the entire issue: The Observer, 2/27/1998

This is one in a series of weekly blog postings describing what was happening at CWRU, as covered by The Observer, during the years many of the Class of 2020 were born.

jmt3 at 09:41 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

February 24, 2017

Namesakes - Lemperly Bookplate Collection

One hundred years ago Western Reserve University received a gift of 540 bookplates, some engravings and books from Mr. and Mrs. Paul Lemperly in memory of their daughter, Lucia, who had attended the College for Women and had passed away in 1915. This gift was placed in the custody of the Adelbert College Library and became known as the Lemperly Bookplate Collection.

Lucia Lemperly was born 2/7/1886 in Cleveland. She graduated from West High School in 1903 and entered the College for Women with the freshman class of 1907. She pursued the Modern Language course. In January 1905 Lucia withdrew on account of health reasons. She died 5/20/1915 at the age of 29. Her father was a wholesale druggist and a collector of bookplates and books about bookplates.

Lucia Lemperly.jpg
Lucia Lemperly

Soon after the gift was received, the bookplates, designed by Edwin Davis French, were exhibited in the English Library at the College for Women in Clark Hall. The exhibition was held from 2/10-2/17/1917. To commemorate this exhibition from 100 years ago, the University Archives and Special Collections have displayed some of the bookplates, copper plates, and books in an exhibit case in the University Archives. The exhibit is available during the months of February and March.

BlogLemperlyExhibit_Invitation.jpg
1917 Exhibit invitation

Prior to the gift, Lemperly’s collection was exhibited at the Case Library in 1899 and the Rowfant Club in 1911.

French was a renowned American engraver. He was born in North Attleboro, Massachusetts in 1851. After studying at Brown University for 2 years, he became chief of the engraving department of the Whiting Company (silversmiths) in New York. In 1893 he designed and engraved his first bookplate for his sister-in-law, Helen E. Brainerd. He soon changed his career to copper engraving (leaving Whiting in 1894). He died in 1906.

The Lemperly Bookplate Collection contains bookplates designed by other artists as well as those used by celebrities of the day. Mr. Lemperly and Mr. French kept up a regular correspondence and the letters from French to Lemperly have been bound and are available in Special Collections along with the bookplates and related books.

hxy2 at 08:53 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

February 21, 2017

Remembering 1997-1998: February 20, 1998

The February 20, 1998 issue of The Observer reported on the College Republicans’ week-long celebration. During “Nuts for Regan Day” they passed out peanuts to honor Ronald Reagan. The week ended with a gala at Wade Commons.

Observer_1998-02-20_p5.jpg

Headlines:
• Krzesinski disqualified from USG exec board
• Parking garage, more housing planned for UCI
• George Wallace to perform at CWRU
• Eyes on: Society of Women Engineers
• Share the Vision searches for new Alma Mater
• Zins explores “Where has King’s message gone?”
• Cleveland Museum of Art exhibits rare treasures from Vatican collections
• Inter-religious council to explore on-campus religious diversity
• The wonderful world of engineering to be celebrated next week
• Ballroom dancers step, swing and trot to awards circle at third annual CWRU competition
• Spartans surge for Sudeck’s 300th victory
• CWRU hosts Claude B. Sharer tournament
• Defeat takes CWRU women to the brink
• Track teams compete at Oberlin College
• Archery Club hosts Ohio Indoor Championships
• Spartan Spotlight: Elie Gurarie, senior fencer

And here's the entire issue:The Observer, 2/20/1998

This is one in a series of weekly blog postings describing what was happening at CWRU, as covered by The Observer, during the years many of the Class of 2020 were born.

jmt3 at 01:43 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

February 14, 2017

Remembering 1997-1998: February 13, 1998

The day before Valentine’s Day, the February 13, 1998 issue of The Observer announced Musicians of CWRU would celebrate the day with a release party for their new CD, featuring 70 minutes of original music. The event was free; the CD cost $3.00.

In other news:
• Krzesinski and Oyster named to USG exec board
• Taft wins Winter Carnival
• Plans make Euclid Avenue more “pedestrian-friendly”
• Eyes On: Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers
• CSE announces the merger of three departments
• Legendary bluesman to be honored in September
• Student Voices: What is your opinion of the death penalty?
• Mr. CWRU contest raises over $1600
• Orpheus descends on Eldred this weekend
• “NewsRadio” is the next great sitcom
• Wellness Week to feature educational programs
• CWRU hosts first ever indoor track meet
• Hoopsters ready to spark in final countdown
• Spartans unable to snap out of 10 game streak
• Spartan Spotlight: Sharon Sanborn, senior swimmer

Observer_1998-02-13_p6.jpg
Civil Engineering’s high school Model Bridge Building Competition

And here's the entire issue: The Observer, 2/13/1998

This is one in a series of weekly blog postings describing what was happening at CWRU, as covered by The Observer, during the years many of the Class of 2020 were born.

jmt3 at 01:49 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

February 06, 2017

Remembering 1997-1998: February 6,1998

The February 6, 1998 issue of The Observer began a three-part series examining University Circle improvements. The first article took a ten-year look at CWRU’s 1988 master plan.

Observer_1998-02-06_p1.jpg

Other Headlines:

• Over 850 vote for USG
• Forum discusses learning
• Eyes On: College Republicans
• CWRU S.T.O.P. gets makeover as CWRU Telefund
• Case engineers beware! Physics III is still required
• Alpha Epsilon Pi gets charter at CWRU
• Cleveland art, artists subject of web project
• Planet E opened at History Museum, fails to impress college visitors
• Reggae fest to honor Bob Marley Saturday
• Nine local photographers showcased in new exhibit
• Swimmers ready to challenge the NCAC
• Spartans sweep UAA with three conference titles
• Spartans drop a pair heading into final conference play
• Men’s basketball surrenders to tough NCAC rivals

And here's the entire issue: The Observer, 2/6/1998

This is one in a series of weekly blog postings describing what was happening at CWRU, as covered by The Observer, during the years many of the Class of 2020 were born.

jmt3 at 01:42 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

January 31, 2017

World War I - summary of WRU campus activity in Spring 1917

The United States officially entered World War I on 4/6/1917. This galvanized actions at Western Reserve University (WRU) and Case School of Applied Science (CSAS).

President Charles F. Thwing
02055D1.jpg


In the WRU President’s Annual Report for 1916/1917, President Thwing wrote:

“The most outstanding feature of the second part of the academic year is found in the war. Until the declaration of a state of war with Germany was made by the President, the interest of the students in the world-conflict was not great. With the making of the declaration, interest was quickened. The interest of the student community, however, was constantly much greater than that of the general. In this condition, it was the endeavor of the Faculty - an endeavor which still abides - and of the administrative officers, first , to make and maintain the devotion of all students to their immediate duties, and secondly, to recognize with fullness and propriety their relation to their larger fellowship, national and international. The reconciliation and co-working of these two aims has not always been easy, but I think it may be justly affirmed that these two objects have been well ordered and fittingly co-ordinated.

“In respect to the great conflict, the Faculty of Adelbert College have passed these votes:

‘That every possible encouragement by given to the immediate inauguration of voluntary military training among the students, that steps be taken to secure military instructors at once for the remainder of the college year, and that we recommend to the Board of Trustees the appropriation of funds necessary to secure such instructors;

‘That some form of systematic physical training under the direction of the department of Physical Training be required of all students for the remainder of the college year, with the view to making our students physically fit for military service;

‘That in the event of a declaration of war and a call for volunteers by the President of the United State, it be suggested to the Athletic Association of the University that inter-collegiate spring sports be abandoned;

‘That it be recommended to the Trustees that students who enlist and are accepted by the government for service in any branch of warfare be given credit for the remainder of the year;

‘That Commencement exercises of a simple nature be held May 10th or 11th for all Seniors in good standing;

‘That compulsory military training be adopted in Adelbert College for the ensuing year;

‘That for the balance of the present college year the executive committee be authorized to grant leave of absence with credit only to students enrolled in military and Red Cross organizations, and that such leave begin upon receipt of mobilization orders, unless in the judgment of the executive committee earlier leave ought in fairness to be granted in individual cases in order to permit students to visit their homes or to adjust their personal affairs before mobilization;

‘That the executive committee be authorized to reduce the examination period to the shortest time possible consistent with the best interests of the students and the College.’

The significance of these actions is made more impressive by reason of the great number of the students of Adelbert College and the Law School who have enrolled, and also of the formation and departure of the Lakeside Hospital unit. The number of men, who have entered the army, navy, and other service, is in Adelbert College one hundred and sixty-two, and in the Law School fifty-four. The staff of the School of Medicine is represented in the Lakeside Hospital Unit by twelve men.

“These bare figures are replete with meaning. They represent the supreme fact that in the hour of the crises of the nation, or of the nations, the college youths are the first to respond. This University is simply repeating in its way the experience through which American Colleges, both north and south, passed at the time of the Civil War and also through which the universities of England, of France, and of Germany, are passing in the course of the present conflict. This result is not surprising. The highest motives, the noblest purposes, make the most important and strongest appeal to men of the worthiest type.”

00832D1.jpg
Officers of the first American contingent to arrive in Europe, General Hospital No. 9 (Lakeside Hospital unit)


Spring 1917 activity on the Case campus will appear next month.

hxy2 at 08:11 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)