January 10, 2018

Urban Vehicle Design Competition

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Car entered in the competition by joint CWRU/CIA team

In 1972 a combined team from CWRU and Cleveland Institute of Art won 1 of 3 awards for styling and design in the National Urban Vehicle Design Competition at the General Motors Proving Grounds in Milford, Michigan. Teams from 67 other universities participated in the competition. It was sponsored by Student Competitions on Relevant Engineering, Inc. (SCORE).

According to President Toepfer's Annual Report for 1972-1973, the team “fields a small automobile, capable of seating four, featuring an impact-resistant bumper and an electronic system which prevents starting the car if the drive is intoxicated. The car is powered by an internal combustion engine converted to run on propane gas, but the team is continuing its efforts to design a steam engine for the vehicle.”

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Several team members with car and holding award plaque

Participating students from CWRU included: Mark K. Altschuler, John S. Amneus, III, Steven R. Buerkel, Roger S. Duff, David D. Evans, Dave J. Fries, Marilyn C. Malone, Steve A. Willeke, John Stenbuck, Ralph Anthony. Students from the Cleveland Institute of Art were: John Breen, Brian Bundy, Julian Carter, Dave Ciganko, Dan Cornell, Ken Foran, Jim Girard, Larry Nagode, John Nottingham, Larry Pentz, Ron Reiman, Marty Smith, Martin Spicuzza, John Spirk, Al Turner. Primary faculty advisers to the program were: Isaac Greber, Professor of Engineering, CWRU; Roy P. Hess, Assistant Head of Industrial Design Department, CIA; and Alan B. Kuper, Associate Professor of Engineering, CWRU.

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January 02, 2018

On This Day in CWRU History: January

Below is month seven of our list of significant dates in CWRU’s history. The list is not comprehensive and we invite suggestions of other dates to include.

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Left: Spook Sonata at Eldred Theatre, 1939; Right: Case men mourn the loss of football, 1954

January 1
1941 Western Reserve University defeated the Arizona State Teachers College in football at the Sun Bowl in El Paso, Texas, 26-13. It was the only time that WRU or Case Institute of Technology appeared in a college football bowl game.

January 3
1908 A reception was held in honor of the opening of Mather Gym. It was the first gym devoted solely to Flora Stone Mather College students.

January 5
1970 The first day of Intersession began CWRU’s 7-year experiment with a month-long, voluntary, intensive study of a single topic.

January 7
1950 John S. Millis was inaugurated as Western Reserve University's last president.

January 9
1969 The Glennan Space Engineering Building was dedicated.

January 11
1958 In the first dual swim meet held in Donnell Pool at Emerson Gymnasium, Case Institute of Technology lost to Grove City College.

January 12
1954 Case Institute of Technology students held a "funeral" by burying a deflated football in front of Tomlinson Hall. Case dropped varsity football 62 years after fielding its first team in 1891. Football returned to the Case campus in 1955.

January 13
1995 As reported by The Observer, seven Tippit House female suite mates won the National College Pigsty Search for the messiest dorm room. They were awarded $1000, a professional room cleaning, and a party for 100 friends.

January 16
1985 Six coin-operated digital word processors were installed in Thwing Center. The cost for use was $2.00/hour. Three letter-quality printers were also available which produced paper copy "as good as anything an IBM Selectric can turn out."
1987 The Canadian rock band, The Guess Who, performed at Adelbert Gym as part of the University Program Board's Re-orientation Party. The event was free for undergraduates, $2 for alumni, and $5 for all others.

January 17
1939 Eldred Hall's new theater addition opened with a production of Spook Sonata.
1991 First Master of Non-Profit Organizations degree conferred.

January 18
1968 The Constitution of the CWRU chapter of the American Association of University Professors was approved, combining the Western Reserve University and Case Institute of Technology chapters.

January 19
1995 Poet Nikki Giovanni was the keynote speaker at the annual Martin Luther King, Jr. Convocation.

January 20
1912 Case School of Applied Science played its first varsity basketball game, losing to Oberlin College, 37-25.

January 24
1888 Western Reserve University Trustees established the College for Women, which was later renamed in honor of Flora Stone Mather.
1888 Hiram C. Haydn was inaugurated as Western Reserve University's fifth president.
1998 CWRU fraternity Zeta Beta Tau held its first annual fundraising "Casino Night" at Thwing Ballroom.

January 26
1972 In its first varsity game, CWRU’s women’s basketball team was defeated by Oberlin 34-30

January 27
1912 In their first meeting, Western Reserve University beat Case School of Applied Science in varsity basketball, 29-19.

January 29
1993 As reported by The Observer, Undergraduate Admissions implemented a new electronic application process on an MS-DOS computer disk. Included on the disk was information about financial aid, dorm life, and maps of University Circle.

January 30
1976 Held at Strosacker Auditorium, the first 24-hour Science Fiction Film Marathon began with a showing of The Day the Earth Stood Still. Other films included Fahrenheit 451, The Andromeda Strain, Metropolis, and The Time Machine. Admission was $1.
2003 Edward M. Hundert was inaugurated as CWRU's sixth president.

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Left: WRU Sun Bowl football program, 1941; Right: Nikki Giovanni at Martin Luther King, Jr. Convocation, 1995

On This Day in CWRU HIstory: July
On This Day in CWRU HIstory: August
On This Day in CWRU History: September
On This Day in CWRU History: October
On This Day in CWRU History: November
On This Day in CWRU History: December

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December 22, 2017

Namesakes - Frederick C. Robbins and Robbins Building

“In deep appreciation for the many contributions that Frederick C. Robbins, M.D. has made to this University and to society, the East Wing of the School of Medicine is hereby named: The Frederick C. Robbins Building”
- text from the building plaque

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Frederick C. Robbins and Robbins Building

Frederick Robbins (1916-2003)
It was 63 years ago this month that Frederick C. Robbins received the Nobel Prize in Medicine or Physiology with John F. Enders and Thomas H. Weller “for their discovery of the ability of poliomyelitis viruses to grow in cultures of various types of tissue.” This discovery led to the Salk and Sabin polio vaccines.

Robbins was Professor of Pediatrics in the School of Medicine at the time of his Nobel Prize honor. He was also Director of Pediatrics and Contagious Diseases at City Hospital (now known as MetroHealth Medical Center). He had begun his appointment at Western Reserve University (WRU) in 1952.

Born 8/25/1916 in Auburn, Alabama, he was raised in Missouri. He received his A.B. from the University of Missouri in 1936 and the B.S. from the University of Missouri Medical School in 1938. He attended Harvard Medical School where he received the M.D. in 1940. He was a resident in Bacteriology at The Children’s Hospital in Boston in 1940-1941 as well as an intern in 1941-1942.

He entered the U. S. Army in 1942, serving until 1946 in the U. S., Italy, and North Africa. He was assigned to the Fifteenth Medical General Laboratory as Chief of the Virus and Rickettsial Disease Section. This unit conducted research on infectious hepatitis, typhus fever and Q fever and supervised general virus diagnostic work. For a 6 month period he was Assistant Director of the Division of Virus and Rickettsial Diseases, Army Medical School under Dr. Joseph E. Smadel. Robbins received the Bronze Star. His rank upon discharge was Major.

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Fred Robbins in Italy during World War II

After World War II, Robbins returned to Boston, serving as Assistant Resident and Chief Resident at The Children’s Hospital, 1946-1948, with a 3 month stint at Vanderbilt University Medical School as Exchange Assistant Resident in Pediatrics. In 1948 he began his work with Dr. John F. Enders and Thomas H. Weller in the Research Division of Infectious Diseases at The Children’s Hospital. As Senior Fellow in Virus Diseases he conducted investigations concerning the mumps virus and polio virus. He resigned his fellowship in 1950 to (in his own words) “continue with Dr. Enders on investigations concerning the cultivation of poliomyelitis virus and the application of these techniques.” At this time he was also a Research Fellow, Instructor, and Associate in Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School.

In 1952 Robbins came to WRU. “I came here really because this school was so alive at that time. It was such a dynamic place. The faculty were an interesting group of people, some of whom I already knew quite well.” (Oral history interview with Frederick C. Robbins, 11/29/1993) These people included Charles Rammelkamp and John Dingle, who he knew through his work in the war at Fort Bragg. A friend and former roommate, Bill Wallace, became head of Pediatrics at Babies and Childrens Hospital of University Hospitals of Cleveland while Robbins became head of Pediatrics at City Hospital - both affiliated hospitals of the School of Medicine. 1952 was the year WRU School of Medicine radically changed its curriculum. Robbins served as chairman of the Committee on Medical Education 1958-1962.

In 1966 Robbins was named dean of the School of Medicine, serving in that position until 1980. It was during this time period that the Robbins Building and Sears Tower were built. In addition to his role as Professor of Pediatrics and Dean, in 1973 Robbins became Professor of Community Health. He was named Dean Emeritus and University Professor in 1980. After a 5 year term as President of the Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences in Washington, D.C., Robbins returned to CWRU. He had an active research program and served as Director of the Center for Adolescent Health. According to his obituary, “In the late 1980s, Robbins was instrumental in establishing the Case medical school’s collaboration with the government of Uganda and Makerere University for HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis research.” He was co-principal investigator of a multidisciplinary research program on AIDS funded by NIH.

Dr. Robbins received many awards and honors such as the First Mead Johnson Award with Dr. Weller, the Kimble Methodology Research Award with Drs. Enders and Weller, the Award for Distinguished Achievement (Modern Medicine), Ohio Governor’s Award, and the Abraham Flexner Award. He received honorary degrees from numerous institutions such as John Carroll University, University of Missouri, University of New Mexico, Tufts University, and The Medical College of Pennsylvania. He served on numerous committees and professional organizations.

On campus, in addition to the Robbins Building naming he received other recognitions: the Special Medical Alumni Association Board of Trustees Award, honorary doctor of science degree, the first Frank and Dorothy Humel Hovorka Prize, the Frederick C. Robbins, M.D. Professorship in Child and Adolescent Health, and a travel fellowship in his name.

Dr. Robbins was married to Alice Northrop and they had 2 children, Christine and Louise.

The Frederick C. Robbins Building
Construction for the Robbins Building began in 1967 and was completed in 1971. As recounted in the Medical Alumni Bulletin: “Ten years of planning and four years of building finally came down to February 1, 1971, when the handsome new East Wing of the School of Medicine was taken over by students, faculty and staff. With no interruption in the regular program of classes and laboratory sessions, Phase I and Phase II students started the day in their comfortable new lecture rooms; in the afternoon, they moved their microscopes and equipment to their new laboratories, where instructions began the next day.”

The Robbins Building, originally called the East Wing, was part of the larger University Medical Center Campaign. At a cost of $38,900,000 new buildings were constructed for the School of Dentistry, Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, and 2 buildings for the School of Medicine. In addition to the Robbins Building which provided teaching and laboratory space as well as space for the Health Sciences Library, the Lester M. and Ruth P. Sears Administration Tower was built and connected the old Medical School building, renamed the West Wing (and later the Wood Building), and the East Wing [Robbins Building]. Sears Tower housed conference rooms and administrative offices.

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Fred Robbins during building construction in 1967

The new Health Sciences Library, housed in the Robbins Building, included over 100,00 titles, 1,200 periodicals, an extensive catalog of AV-TV materials, general reading rooms, individual carrels and conference rooms. Three floors of the building housed student mulitidisciplinary laboratories, lecture and conference rooms, and 2 floors housed the Department of Anatomy. The lower level contained the Animal Facility and Surgical Research Unit, and the ground floor held the Health Sciences Communication Center (HSCC). The HSCC was “the hub of a network which will link the three health sciences schools, University Hospitals, and eventually the other affiliated hospitals of the School of Medicine for the transmission of programs of undergraduate and graduate education.”

On 5/15/2003, 32 years after he had seen it through to construction, the East Wing of the School of Medicine was dedicated and renamed in honor of Fred Robbins. It was a fitting tribute. Dr. Robbins died 8/4/2003. At his memorial service held on the CWRU campus 9/19/2003, his brother Dan spoke. As part of his remarks he said, “Fred was my big brother, my teacher, my friend and my hero. He was also the best man at my wedding and provided medication for my nerves---a small glass of sherry...You remember him as a great scientist, a great educator and a great humanitarian. I remember him as great brother. I want to thank all of you for coming to honor him.”

The CWRU Archives has Dr. Robbins office files as dean and his personal papers.

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December 06, 2017

On This Day in CWRU History: December

Below is month six of our list of significant dates in CWRU’s history. The list is not comprehensive and we invite suggestions of other dates to include.

December 1
1971 Under head coach Bill Sudeck, the newly merged CWRU basketball team lost to Oberlin College, 96-84.
1986 A new microcomputer laboratory, featuring Apple computers, opened in Freiberger Library. Almost 2400 people used the lab during its first 20 weeks.

December 2
1968 The newly formed Afro-American Society at CWRU presented several demands to President Morse. Among them that courses leading to a degree in Afro-American studies be offered.

December 3
1828 As reported in Western Reserve College's Board of Trustee minutes, the first bequest given to the College was from Reverend Nathan B. Derrow. Upon his death, one half of Derrow's library came to the College.
1971 CWRU Trustees combined Adelbert, Flora Stone Mather, and Cleveland Colleges to create the Consolidated Colleges.

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Heraldic banner of the School of Applied Social Sciences

December 4
1915 Western Reserve University Trustees established the School of Applied Social Sciences.
1963 William Sudeck, longtime coach at Case Institute of Technology and CWRU, coached his first basketball game at Case, defeating Walsh College, 88-56. Sudeck coached basketball at the University for 36 years.

December 5
1970 The newly merged CWRU swim team faced off against the University of Akron in its first meet.
1970 The newly merged CWRU men's wrestling team participated in the University of Rochester Invitational tournament.

December 6
1930 Case School of Applied Science had its first varsity fencing match, defeating Youngstown College 9-7.

December 7
1994 The Holiday CircleFest debuted. University Circle institutions opened in the evening for holiday shopping, exhibits, music, and activities.

December 8
2003 Groundbreaking ceremonies were held for the Village at 115 dormitory complex.

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Dr. Frederick Robbins, 1956

December 10
1954 Dr. Frederick Robbins, Western Reserve University professor of pediatrics, received the Nobel Prize in Medicine or Physiology. Robbins was later dean of the School of Medicine and University Professor.

December 11
1953 Ground breaking ceremonies were held for the William E. Wickenden Electrical Engineering Building at Case Institute of Technology. Wickenden was president of Case from 1929 to 1947.
1969 The Constitution of the University Faculty was approved by the CWRU Trustees.
1986 The A. R. Jennings Computing Center opened the Microcomputer Information Center in Room 319 Wickenden.

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Heraldic banner of the School of Graduate Studies

December 12
1828 Western Reserve College faculty member Rufus Nutting and ten WRC students established the Handel Society. Meeting weekly, members practiced singing and read essays about musical subjects and musicians.
1892 Western Reserve University Trustees established the Department of Graduate Instruction, later the School of Graduate Studies.
1973 CWRU Trustees authorized planning for a major fundraising campaign. The Resources Campaign, 1976-1981, raised over $215 million.
1988 Finals week Late Night Breakfast began. Free breakfast was served to students at 11 pm at Leutner and Fribley Commons.

December 13
1969 The newly merged CWRU men's fencing team met Oberlin College in its first match.

December 15
1998 The 0.9m telescope at CWRU's Nassau Astronomical Station in Geauga County was the country's first Earth-bound robotic telescope available online to the public.

December 16
1945 Laura Diehl became the first woman to receive an undergraduate degree from the Case School of Applied Science, earning a B.S. in Physics.

December 17
1919 Western Reserve University's student newspaper, The Reserve Weekly, reported that Adelbert Main was finally wired for electricity.
1990 The move into the new Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences building began. This was the first campus building wired for data, voice, and video communications in its original construction.

December 18
1947 At the first college sporting event televised in Cleveland, Western Reserve University's basketball team defeated Fenn College at Adelbert Gym, 63-26.

December 19
1891 Case School of Applied Science and Western Reserve University varsity football teams met for the first time. WRU defeated Case, 22-0. Over the next 79 years, Case and WRU played each other 74 times. WRU had 49 wins; Case had 20 wins; they tied 5 times.
1892 Western Reserve University Trustees renamed the School of Law in honor of Franklin Thomas Backus.
1910 Case School of Applied Science and Western Reserve University fielded varsity hockey teams for the first time. They played each other at the Elysium, and WRU was victorious over Case, 3-1.
1952 Case Institute of Technology and Western Reserve University dedicated a plaque on their common border near Euclid Avenue in honor of the Michelson-Morley ether drift experiments of July 1887.

December 20
1922 At the College for Women Christmas Carol service, the new Harkness Chapel organ was dedicated.

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Case family Christmas party, 1963

December 23
1963 Case Institute of Technology held its first annual Family Christmas Party for all faculty, staff, and their families in Emerson Gym.
1966 Joint Case-WRU Trustee Committee recommended establishment of a federated university to be called Case Western Reserve University (CWRU) "to bring into being a nationally-recognized community of academic excellence."
1969 For the first time, the fall semester ended in December.
1973 CWRU President Louis A. Toepfer made his annual Christmas Walk across campus, bringing holiday greetings to all staff.

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Jason J. Nassau with the Burrell Schmidt-type telescope at Warner & Swasey Observatory

December 29
1941 Dedication ceremonies for the enlarged Warner & Swasey Observatory and new Burrell Schmidt-type telescope were held in conjunction with the meeting of the American Astronomical Society.

On This Day in CWRU HIstory: July
On This Day in CWRU HIstory: August
On This Day in CWRU History: September
On This Day in CWRU History: October
On This Day in CWRU History: November

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November 22, 2017

Case vs. WRU 1947 Thanksgiving Day Game and Activities

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Cartoon from the 11/21/1947 Case Tech

Seventy years ago Thanksgiving Day once again witnessed the Case vs. Reserve annual football game. In anticipation of the contest, the Reserve Tribune reported, “Turkey Day this year will witness the 55th clash between the ancient fence rivals, Case and Reserve. Few rivalries can boast as illustrious a history as this one. Having compiled a record of 34 wins and five ties in the 52 games played thus far, the Red Cats will strive this year to make it 16 straight over the Rough Riders.”

Cartoon and schedule of events from the 11/21/1947 Reserve Tribune
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Both schools held rallies at 11 a.m. the Wednesday before the game. Reserve students gathered in Amasa Stone Chapel while Case students gathered at Van Horn Field. The rallies, as you would imagine, did not end calmly. After singing the Alma Mater to close the official rally, some Reserve students had a dummy and suggested stringing it from the top of Case’s tallest tree. According to the account in the Reserve Tribune the several students “went over to Case to do their duty. But, they made one mistake. They didn’t wait for the whole crowd. While they were still outnumbered the Case boys took the dummy and proceeded to tear it apart. By the time reinforcements had arrived all that was left of the dummy was the football pants that it was wearing. These were promptly rescued....The pants were strung up in the tree and secured there. Several of the plumbers attempted to climb the tree but were promptly hauled back down. They were only de-shoed, however, in consideration for the Mather girls who were milling around inciting the boys to riot. Then some of the Case boys went out and proceeded to tie up traffic on Euclid, de-trolleying several streetcars...”

The football game was held at 10:30 a.m. Thanksgiving Day (11/27) in front of 8,500 fans at League Park. It was an exciting game as the Red Cats beat the Rough Riders 13-12. As reported in both the Tribune and the Case Tech, the field was frozen and neither team could move the ball in the first quarter. In the second quarter, Reserve scored a touchdown after a 67 yard drive. Nate Corbin took the hand-off from the quarterback at the Case 45, swept wide around the left end and ran for score. The pass for the extra point was incomplete and the Red Cats led 6-0. Near the beginning of the second half Case came back and scored when the quarterback took it in from the 2 yard line. Case also missed the extra point and the score was tied 6-6.

Later in the 3rd quarter Reserve end Mike Nesteruk recovered a Case fumble on their 34 yard line. After a few plays quarterback Lahr passed to Johnny Franko in the end zone for the score. George Roman kicked the extra point and Reserve took the lead 13-6. “Case, undaunted by their opponents’ lead, came roaring back in the last period. After a punt had rolled out on the Reserve 2, Lahr was forced to kick out of danger. The kick was blocked by Case’s Bob Gorman, and the Rough Riders recovered on the 3 yard line. On the second play, Halfback Wayne Zahn carried the pigskin over on a deceptive handoff. A poor pass from center ruined the Riders’ chances of knotting the ball game.”

In the evening the Reserve ODK (Omicron Delta Kappa - national honorary campus leadership society) and Case Blue Key dance was held at Hotel Cleveland. Both the ODK and Blue Key queens presided at the dance. They were presented to the crowd and crowned by bandleader Tommy Dorsey at the halftime ceremonies during the game. The dance was held from 9 p.m.-2 a.m. The cost was $2.25. per couple. Advance ticket holders at Case were entered into a raffle for ducks and turkeys held during the pre-game rally.

See accounts of other Thanksgiving Day games and events in blog entries from 2017, 2013 , 2012, 2011 , 2010 and 2nd 2010 entry.

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November 15, 2017

Thanksgiving Day Vesper Service, 11/25/1947

On Tuesday, 11/25/1947, Western Reserve University (WRU) held its regular Thanksgiving Vesper Service in Amasa Stone Chapel. President Winfred Leutner, Reverend George Nostrand, University Chaplain, and Rabbi Stephen Sherman, Director of the local chapter of the Hillel Foundation, presided. Leutner read the Thanksgiving proclamation from President Truman. Rev. Nostrand read an Invocation and The Lord’s Prayer. Rabbi Sherman read the scripture lesson and a prayer. The University Choir, under the direction of Director Russell L. Gee, also performed several songs and hymns.

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(l-r) Rabbi Stephen Sherman, President Winfred Leutner, and Rev. George Nostrand look over President Truman's Thanksgiving Proclamation

Rev. Nostrand gave the address, “Glad You’re Alive.” While the Archives does not have the text of this address, the Reserve Tribune (11/21/1947) reported that the address stressed the meaning of the first Thanksgiving as a basis for the observance of the holiday.

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Program for the 1947 Thanksgiving Vesper Service

Members of the Adelbert Student Council and Mather Student Government served as ushers. All University personnel (faculty, students, and staff) and residents of the neighborhood were welcome to attend the service.

Read descriptions of Thanksgiving and the traditional Case vs. Reserve game in blog entries from 2010, 2nd 2010 entry, 2011, 2012, and 2013.

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November 02, 2017

On This Day in CWRU History: November

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Left: Sigma Chi members, 1910; Right: CWRU’s undefeated football team carries coach Jim Chapman off the field, 1984

Below is month five of our list of significant dates in CWRU’s history. The list is not comprehensive and we invite suggestions of other dates to include.

November 1
1843 First classes were held by the School of Medicine.

November 2
1957 Cornerstone was laid for the Newton D. Baker Memorial Building on the corner of Euclid Avenue and Adelbert Road.

November 3
1909 Beta Eta of Sigma Chi became the first joint Case Institute of Technology - Western Reserve University fraternity chapter.
1958 Dedication ceremonies were held at Case Institute of Technology for Strosacker Auditorium. It was named for Charles J. Strosacker, Case 1906.
1969 Constitution of the University Faculty was approved by the CWRU General Faculty.
1984 By defeating Carnegie Mellon University at home, 25-17, CWRU's varsity football team finished 9-0, its first undefeated season.

November 4
1846 School of Medicine opened its first building, located in downtown Cleveland.
1890 Western Reserve University played its first varsity football game, losing to the Clevelands, 6-0.
1988 The Microcomputer Information Center closed as the result of the reorganization of computing and information services. A. R. Jennings Computing Center took over some of the support services at its location in Crawford Hall.

November 6
1920 Case School of Applied Science ran its first varsity cross country race, placing 6th out of 7 teams in the Big Six Meet held at Ohio Wesleyan University.

November 7
1891 Case School of Applied Science played its first varsity football game, losing to Buchtel College, 42-0.

November 8
1985 Frederick Gregory spoke on campus at the Minority Engineering Career Conference. Gregory was the first African-American to pilot a spacecraft when he flew Challenger in 1985. His father, Francis, was a 1928 graduate of the Case School of Applied Science.

November 9
1934 Thwing Hall was dedicated as Western Reserve University's new University Library. It was named for former WRU president Charles F. Thwing.
1961 Former U.S. president Dwight Eisenhower was the guest of honor at “Night with Ike,” held at Horsburgh Gym. The program was televised to Strosacker Auditorium and Tomlinson Hall.
1996 Phi Delta Theta fraternity celebrated its 100th anniversary. It was founded at Case School of Applied Science in 1896.

November 10
1971 Louis A. Toepfer was inaugurated as CWRU's second president.
1979 CWRU sorority Sigma Psi held the first “Mr. CWRU” contest before a capacity crowd at Fribley Commons. Scott Elliot, a Cleveland Institute of Music student, was the first Mr. CWRU.
1994 Campus News reported that the Cleveland Institute of Music was online with CWRUnet. It was the first external organization connected to CWRUnet.

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Dwight Eisenhower, T. Keith Glennan, and Henry Heald honor Eisenhower, 11/9/1961

November 11
1902 Dedication ceremonies were held for Haydn Hall. Named for former WRU president Hiram Haydn, Haydn Hall opened as a women's dormitory.
1921 Memorial tablet honoring the Western Reserve University men who died in World War I was unveiled in Amasa Stone Chapel.
1955 Case Institute of Technology held groundbreaking ceremonies for the Sam W. Emerson Physical Education Center. Sam Emerson graduated from Case in 1902.
1988 As reported by The Observer, a Macintosh computer virus NVIR affected CWRU computer labs. It was unknown how the virus arrived on campus. Computer disks were checked for the virus before use in campus computer labs.

November 12
1938 Case School of Applied Science varsity football team played their final home game at Van Horn Field, losing to Miami University, 27-12. Case games would return to campus in 1953, playing their home contests at Western Reserve University's Clarke Field.
1948 The newly established NAACP (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People) chapter at Western Reserve University held its first meeting.

November 13
1922 Administrators, students, and trustees from Western Reserve University, Case School of Applied Science, School of Education, and the School of Art gathered at Adelbert Gym to celebrate Armistice Day.
1926 Dedication ceremonies were held for the Allen Memorial Library.
1984 Sandra Day O'Connor, the first woman appointed to the U. S. Supreme Court, spoke at Gund Hall as part of the Sumner Canary Lecture series.

November 14
1969 The dormitory complexes on Murray Hill and Carlton Roads were dedicated.

November 15
1969 Western Reserve University beat Case Institute of Technology in football, 28-14. It was the final time these schools would play each other in football. Since their first game in 1891, WRU won 48 times, Case won 20, and 6 games were tied.
1980 Dedication ceremonies were held for the newly renovated Thwing Student Center and Claud Foster Park.
1988 Trustee Executive Committee added sexual orientation to CWRU’s non-discrimination policy.

November 16
1958 Newton D. Baker Memorial Building was dedicated.
1980 David V. Ragone was inaugurated as CWRU's third president.
1997 I. F. Freiberger Pavilion in the Kelvin Smith Library and I. F. Freiberger Field were dedicated.

November 19
1999 CWRU Film Society presented a marathon of films from Hollywood Director, Stanley Kubrick, who died in March 1999. Films shown were Eyes Wide Shut, Dr. Strangelove, and A Clockwork Orange.

November 24
1970 First joint meeting of the Executive Committee of the CWRU Trustees and Faculty Senate was held.

November 25
1988 Fire destroyed the Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity house at 11120 Magnolia Drive. Losses were estimated at $750,000.

November 26
1963 University convocation was held in memory of President John F. Kennedy at Amasa Stone Chapel.

November 28
1988 One-to-One Fitness Center began full operation.

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WWI memorial tablet, 1921

On This Day in CWRU HIstory: July
On This Day in CWRU HIstory: August
On This Day in CWRU History: September
On This Day in CWRU History: October

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