June 05, 2018

On This Day in CWRU History: June

Below is the last month of our list of significant dates in CWRU’s history. The list is not comprehensive and we invite suggestions of other dates to include.

June 1
1978: CWRU Trustees established the John S. Diekhoff Award for Distinguished Graduate Teaching.

June 2
1960: Mei Mei Wang became the first woman awarded a Ph.D. from the Case Institute of Technology. Dr. Wang also received her M.S. in Chemical Engineering from Case in 1958.

June 5
1939: Fred Easly Sheibley received the first Ph.D. conferred by Case School of Applied Science.
1997: The Campus Greens, location of Philip Johnson's sculpture Turning Point, was dedicated.

June 8
1905: Ambrose Swasey, longtime trustee of the Case School of Applied Science and Western Reserve University, received the honorary Doctor of Engineering degree, the first honorary degree awarded by CSAS.

June 9
1955: Millicent C. McIntosh, president, Barnard College, and dean, Columbia University received an honorary degree from Case Institute of Technology, the only woman to receive that honor.

June 10
1890: Western Reserve University and Case School of Applied Science participated in their first track meet, competing with Mt. Union and Hiram Colleges. Held at the YMCA Park in Cleveland, WRU won the meet.

June 11
1901: Haydn Hall's cornerstone was laid. Named in honor of former WRU president Hiram Haydn. Haydn Hall opened as a women's dormitory.
1908: The cornerstone for the Morley Chemistry Laboratory was laid. The building was named in honor of former WRU faculty member Edward Morley.
1911: Amasa Stone Chapel, named in honor of Cleveland businessman Amasa Stone, was dedicated.
1913: Cleveland mayor Newton D. Baker spoke at Western Reserve University's College for Women commencement ceremony. His speech was entitled, "The Place of a College for Women in a Great City."
1929: Western Reserve University Trustees approved an affiliation with the Cleveland School of Architecture.
1935: Western Reserve University Trustees renamed the School of Nursing in honor of U. S. Congresswoman Frances Payne Bolton.
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Frances Payne Bolton

June 12
1923: Western Reserve University Trustees established the School of Nursing.
1935: Olive Baxter Stevens became the first woman to graduate from the School of Architecture, six years after its affiliation with Western Reserve University.

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Hudson Relay, 1910

June 13
1900: The cornerstone was laid for Harkness Chapel, Western Reserve University's first chapel building. It was named in honor of Florence Harkness Severance.
1910: The Hudson Relay was run for the first time. The class of 1912 won, with a finish time of 2 hours and 1 minute.
1912: Four years after the Cleveland School of Pharmacy affiliated with Western Reserve University, Birdie Rehmer became its first woman graduate.
1934: Winfred G. Leutner was inaugurated as Western Reserve University's eighth president, and was the only alumnus to serve as president of WRU.
1961: Aaron Strauss was the first recipient of the Kent H. Smith award, awarded to the outstanding engineering senior, who "displays extraordinary qualities of leadership, character, and scholarship."
1992: Karen Horn was elected as the first woman chair of the CWRU Board of Trustees

June 14
1911: The cornerstone was laid for Flora Stone Mather Memorial Building. It became the main administration building for Flora Stone Mather College.
1929: The cornerstone for the Institute of Pathology was laid.
1957:
Camp Case
, in Mohican State Forest near Loudonville, Ohio, closed. It served as a summer survey camp for Case Institute of Technology students for 21 years.
June 15
1885: Case School of Applied Science held its first commencement, graduating 5 men. It was held at the Case Hall Auditorium in downtown Cleveland.
1896: Hatch Library was dedicated. It was Western Reserve University's first building solely used as a library.
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Camp Case, Mohican State Forest

1896: The cornerstone ceremonies were held for the Franklin Thomas Backus School of Law building on the corner of Adelbert Road and Circle Drive.
1911: Western Reserve University's commencement convocation was held for the first time at the newly-constructed Amasa Stone Chapel.
1932: Western Reserve University's commencement convocation was held for the first time at the newly-constructed Severance Hall.

June 16
1910: Lucy Gertrude Hoffman became the first woman graduate of Western Reserve University's Dental School, eighteen years after the School's establishment.
1915: Mather House was dedicated. It opened as a dorm for female undergraduate students.
1921: Hannah Mirsky became the first woman graduate of Western Reserve University's Franklin Thomas Backus School of Law.
1926: Florence Ellinwood Allen, Ohio Supreme Court Justice and a graduate of Western Reserve University's College for Women in 1904, gave the first of her three commencement speeches at WRU's College for Women.
1927: Herbert M. Knowles was the only member of the first graduating class of Western Reserve University's Cleveland College.
1948: Carl Wittke, long time Western Reserve University faculty member and dean of the Graduate School, spoke for the first of sixteen times at a WRU commencement ceremony.

June 17
1895: The cornerstone was laid for Hatch Library. It was Western Reserve University's first building solely used as a library.
1909: The cornerstone of Amasa Stone Chapel was laid. The chapel was named in honor of Cleveland businessman Amasa Stone.
1996: The Kelvin Smith Library officially opened.

June 18
1895: Mary Noyes Colvin, who in 1895 became the first woman to receive a Ph.D. from Western Reserve University, was the main speaker at WRU's commencement.
1993: The Richard F. Celeste Biomedical Research Building was dedicated.

June 19
1888: Western Reserve University Trustees approved an affiliation with the Western Reserve School of Design for Women, which was renamed the School of Art.
1898: Dedication ceremonies for Eldred Hall were held. Eldred Hall was the first student union of Adelbert College.

June 21
1897: Cornerstone was laid for Eldred Hall. Eldred Hall was the first student union of Adelbert College.

June 23
1991:
Fire gutted Adelbert Hall,
the oldest campus building. It took two years to rebuild the historic structure.
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June 24
1994: The Health Sciences Center was renamed the Louis Stokes Health Sciences Center.

June 26
1872: Carroll Cutler was inaugurated as Western Reserve College's fourth president.

June 28
1876: Viola Smith Buell became the first woman to graduate from Western Reserve College, fifty years after its establishment.

June 30
1949: The School of Pharmacy at Western Reserve University closed.


On This Day in CWRU HIstory: July
On This Day in CWRU HIstory: August
On This Day in CWRU History: September
On This Day in CWRU History: October
On This Day in CWRU History: November
On This Day in CWRU History: December
On This Day in CWRU History: January
On This Day in CWRU History: February
On This Day in CWRU History: March
On This Day in CWRU History: April
On This Day in CWRU History: May

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May 29, 2018

Western Reserve University School of Pharmacy

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While CWRU has 3 health related schools at the present time (School of Dental Medicine, School of Medicine, and Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing), there was also a School of Pharmacy from 1908 to 1949. This School was first established in 1882 as the Cleveland School of Pharmacy by the Cleveland Pharmaceutical Association. According to a history of the School by Edward D. Davy in 1941, E. A Schellentrager, a retail pharmacist was the “originator of the idea of formal training for prospective pharmacists.” Schellentrager became the first president of the School serving until 1905. The School was chartered under the laws of Ohio as the Cleveland School of Pharmacy on 12/20/1886. The incorporators were Schellentrager, Joseph H. Peck, P. I. Spenzer, G. L. Heckler, George Keiffer, and Henry W. Stecher.

The School became affiliated with Western Reserve University in 1908. It was renamed the Cleveland School of Pharmacy of Western Reserve University (WRU) in 1917. The School closed in 1949.

Curriculum
In the first year, 1 lecture was offered each week for 20 weeks. It was to be a practical elementary course in Pharmaceutical Chemistry. Nathan Rosenwasser was the lecturer. In the second year, Stecher and C. W. Kolbe were the lecturers. In the third year the course was extended to 30 lectures with optional lectures 2 evenings a week. No degrees were conferred by the School.

In 1896-1897 the curriculum was expanded to 3 years leading to the Pharmaceutical Chemist degree. There were 3 classes: freshman, junior, and senior classes.

At the time the School became part of WRU in the 1908/09 academic year, 2 degrees were offered, the Pharmaceutical Chemist (Ph.C.) and the Graduate in Pharmacy (Ph.G.). The difference in degrees depended on the high school experience of the student. Students with 1 year of a “good high school course” received the Ph.G. degree. Students who graduated from high school received the Ph.C. The 2 degrees were almost identical in the theoretical branches. The 2-year course was for full-time students and the tuition was $100 per year. The full-time course included more laboratory work. The 3-year course allowed the student time to work in a local drug store. The tuition was $65 per year.

The Doctor of Pharmacy (Phar.D.) was awarded to candidates who graduated from a “reputable school of pharmacy, who has had at least ten years of pharmaceutical experience since graduation; who presents an acceptable dissertation and who passes an examination before the Committee on Examination.”

Over time the Ph.G. degree became the 2-year degree program and Ph.C. became the 3 year program. Students were not admitted to the 2 -year course of study after the 1924/25 academic year. The Ph.C. and B.S. degrees were offered. The Ph.C. degree was not offered after 6/1935, leaving the B.S. as the only degree offered. Graduate work was possible through the Graduate School.

Enrollment
Total enrollment was 76 in 1908/09. Enrollment was 130 in the last year of existence (1948/49).

Deans
The deans of the School, 1908-1949, were:
1908-1911 Henry V. Arny
1911-1912 Norman A. Dubois
1912-1913 T. Barnard Tanner
1913-1916 William C. Alpers
1916-1940 Edward Spease
1940-1941 Edward D. Davy, Acting Dean
1941-1943 Edward D. Davy
1943-1944 Franklin J. Bacon, Acting Dean
1944-1949 Arthur P. Wyss

Buildings
The School of Pharmacy was located in downtown Cleveland until 1920 when it moved to a house on Adelbert Road. The buildings used by the School included:
1882 - part of a floor of Cleveland City Hall
1900 - 2 floors of Cleveland Gas Light and Coke Company (also called the Gas Building
1910-1920 - Ohio Wesleyan Medical School building
1920-1949 - 2029/2045 Adelbert Road
1933 - Pierce Hall

In 1921 a garden of medicinal plants was established on campus under the management of the Department of Pharmacognosy. In the Spring of 1929 the garden was transferred to Squire Valleevue Farm.

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Andrew Squire in medicinal herb garden and plants and seeds harvested from the farm


Plants were cultivated for propagation (for use in the manufacturing laborary) and research. According to Davy’s history, “The School maintains research and manufacturing laboratories, where U.S.P, N.F., and special formulae preparations are made for the hospitals of Cleveland. By agreement between Western Reserve University and the University Hospitals of Cleveland the Head of the Department of Pharmacy in the School of Pharmacy serves as the Directing Pharmacist of the University Hospitals, and the pharmacists in the hospitals become members of the teaching staff of the School. Students are required to take a course in hospital pharmacy under the direction of the hospitals pharmacists. An advanced course in hospital pharmacy is open to students who in the opinion of the faculty show special aptitude and ability.”

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Pharmacy students in laboratory, 1913

Records of the School and more information about the School of Pharmacy is available in the University Archives.

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May 01, 2018

On This Day in CWRU History: May

Below is month eleven of our list of significant dates in CWRU’s history. The list is not comprehensive and we invite suggestions of other dates to include.

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Campus anti-war protests, May 1970

May 2
1908 Western Reserve University students held their first mock political convention at Gray's Armory. The convention nominated Senator Robert LaFollette of Wisconsin for U.S. president.
1948 Case Institute of Technology's new student union, Tomlinson Hall, was dedicated.
1970 An open meeting was held to protest expansion of the Vietman War to Cambodia.

May 3
1970 Demonstrators occupied Yost Hall to protest the campus ROTC program headquartered in the building.

May 4
1970 Student Vietnam war protesters blocked the intersection of Euclid Avenue and Adelbert Road. That night a candlelight procession was held in memory of the Kent State student killed and wounded earlier that day.
1971 Boxer Muhammad Ali spoke at Adelbert Gym. The lecture was sponsored by the UUSG Speakers Bureau and the Adelbert College Junior Class.
1985 Completely renovated as part of the Mather Quad restoration effort, Guilford House was rededicated.

May 5
1970 Faculty Senate 4-1/2 hour meeting debated continuation of the ROTC program and other issues related to anti-war protests. Radio station WRUW broadcast the proceedings.

May 6
1961 Groundbreaking ceremonies were held for Western Reserve University's Mather I dormitory complex, consisting of Cutter, Smith, Taft, and Taplin Houses, and Stone Dining Hall.
1970 A ROTC supply room in the basement of Yost Hall was firebombed. Damage was $5,000.

May 7
1971 Case Institute of Technology and Western Reserve University's baseball teams faced off in the last meeting of these two schools in intercollegiate sports. WRU beat Case 7-5 in 10 innings.

May 8
1917 Lakeside Base Hospital Number Four, comprised of 256 men and women, including faculty from the School of Medicine, sailed for Europe one month after the United States entered World War I.
1971 Buffalo Bob Smith, the star of the "Howdy Doody Show," appeared at Emerson Gym. Smith told behind-the-scene anecdotes, showed film of the 10th anniversary show, and led the audience in singing old Howdy Doody songs. Tickets were $1.50.
1986 Trustees approved establishment of the Center on Regional Economic Issues in the Weatherhead School of Management.

May 9
1968 Trustee Executive Committee approved establishment of the Biomedical Engineering Department.

May 10
1961 Groundbreaking ceremonies were held at Case Institute of Technology for the Olin Laboratory for Materials.

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May 11
1903 Western Reserve University Trustees established the Library School.
1904 Charles S. Howe was inaugurated as Case School of Applied Science's second president.
1948 Case Institute of Technology students held their first mock political convention, nominating Senator Arthur Vandenburg of Michigan as candidate for U.S. president.

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May 12
1994 Former First Lady Rosalynn Carter spoke at the Florence Cellar Gerontology Conference, sponsored by the Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing.

May 13
1885 Laura Kerr Axtell donated property worth $125,000 in the city of Cleveland, as well as the township of Rockport, to endow the Kerr Professorship of Mathematics, the first named professorship at Case School of Applied Science.
1972 The Health Sciences Center complex, containing new and expanded homes for the Schools of Nursing, Dentistry, and Medicine, was dedicated.

May 14
1965 Retiring CIT President Glennan was honored by a surprise tribute organized by students at
Students Salute Keith Glennan Day.

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May 15
1928 Western Reserve University Trustees established the School of Education.
1969 When an attempt by 200 protesters to occupy the President's office in Adelbert Main was thwarted by counter demonstrators, the protesters, primarily students, proceeded to occupy Haydn Hall for four days.

May 16
1999 Former astronaut and U. S. Senator John Glenn spoke at CWRU's spring commencement convocation.

May 17
1946 All Hudson Relay teams were disqualified for using cars instead of running the race.

May 18
1920 Following the re-opening of the School of Medicine to women, female students established the Theta chapter of the Nu Sigma Phi medical sorority.
1961 Case Institute of Technology formally dedicated the Library-Humanities Building. In 1966, it was renamed the Lester M. and Ruth P. Sears Library-Humanities Building.
2003 Geraldine Ferraro, who in 1984 became the first woman to run on a U.S. presidential ticket of a major party, gave the address at CWRU's main commencement ceremony.

May 19
1967 Case Institute of Technology and Western Reserve University purchased Fenway Motor Inn, renamed University House, to provide housing for married and single graduate students.

May 21
1948 T. Keith Glennan was inaugurated as Case Institute of Technology's fourth president.
1957 Dedication ceremonies were held for Case Institute of Technology's second student dormitory, Pardee Hall.
1969 CWRU's University Undergraduate Student Government Assembly held its first meeting.
1969 CWRU Trustees approved phase one of a joint music program with Cleveland Institute of Musice, to begin in fall 1969.
2000 Stephanie Tubbs Jones, Ohio Congresswoman and 1971 Flora Stone Mather College and 1974 Law graduate, spoke at CWRU's School of Law commencement ceremony. Ferid Murad, a 1998 Nobel Prize laureate and a 1965 Western Reserve University graduate, spoke at CWRU's School of Medicine commencement ceremony.

May 22
1894 School of Medicine became the first medical college in Ohio to require four years of study to earn the M.D. degree.
1896 Western Reserve University and Case School of Applied Science held their first Intercollegiate Field Day in track. Held at the Cleveland Driving Park, WRU beat Case, 74-54.
1985 The first outdoor, University-wide, CWRU commencement ceremony was held.

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May 23
1958 In use since 1901, the Case Institute of Technology athletic field was renamed Van Horn Field, in honor of former Case faculty member Frank "the Count" Van Horn.

May 24
1916 In an early use of the transcontinental telephone line, attendees at the Case School of Applied Science alumni dinner spoke via telephone with Case alumni at simultaneous gatherings in New York City and San Francisco.
1957 Dedication ceremonies were held at Case Institute of Technology for the newly completed Sam W. Emerson Physical Education Center.
1990 The Staff Advisory Council, CWRU's first, fully representative staff organization, held its first official meeting.

May 26
1911 Case School of Applied Science competed for the first time in varsity tennis by participating in the Ohio Intercollegiate Tennis Tournament held at Ohio Wesleyan University.
1951 Case Institute of Technology formally dedicated its first campus dormitory, Yost Hall.

May 27
1981 Dr. Benjamin Spock, noted pediatrician and former Western Reserve University faculty member, gave the address at CWRU's School of Medicine commencement ceremony.

May 28
1931 Case School of Applied Science's commencement convocation was held for the first time at the newly-constructed Severance Hall.
1970 Polykarp Kusch, 1955 Nobel Prize laureate, and a 1931 graduate of Case Institute of Technology, spoke at CIT's commencement ceremony.

May 29
1891 Western Reserve University Trustees established the School of Law.

May 31
1928 Nearly 50 years after its establishment, the Case School of Applied Science graduated its first woman, Edith Paula Chartkoff, who received an M.S. in Metallurgy.

On This Day in CWRU HIstory: July
On This Day in CWRU HIstory: August
On This Day in CWRU History: September
On This Day in CWRU History: October
On This Day in CWRU History: November
On This Day in CWRU History: December
On This Day in CWRU History: January
On This Day in CWRU History: February
On This Day in CWRU History: March
On This Day in CWRU History: April

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April 03, 2018

On This Day in CWRU History: April

Below is month ten of our list of significant dates in CWRU’s history. The list is not comprehensive and we invite suggestions of other dates to include.

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Case Tech, April Fool's edition, 1970

April 1
A timeless tradition found in most of the student newspapers - the April Fool’s edition.
1972 The newly merged CWRU outdoor track team participated in the Marietta College Relays.

April 4
1892 Nu Sigma Nu medical fraternity was established by twenty-six students and faculty members at the School of Medicine.
1941 Case School of Applied Science defeated John Carroll University at the Cleveland Arena, 2-1, to win the Big Four hockey title in the third game of a best of three series. It was the final varsity hockey game for Case.
1960 The Case Institute of Technology Men's Glee Club released their first album, Case Men Sing. Featuring Case songs such as "Carmen Case," "Alma Mater," and the "Fight Song," the first edition sold out within a week.

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April 5
1972 The newly merged CWRU baseball team played Youngstown State University.
1972 The newly merged CWRU tennis team faced off against Oberlin College.
1974 Cesar Chavez, president of the United Farm Workers of America, spoke at Amasa Stone Chapel. Sponsored by the CWRU Farmworkers' Support Committee, the event was free to the public.

April 6
1959 Poet Robert Frost spoke to a capacity crowd at Case’s Emerson Gym.

April 7
1950 As reported in the Case Institute of Technology newspaper, Case Tech, Tau Beta Pi announced the establishment of a faculty evaluation program for students. One-page questionnaires were distributed to students to grade instructors.

April 8
1851 Western Reserve College faculty approved the student social organization, the Equitable Fraternity, later known as Oudon Adelon, and even later as Delta Upsilon.
1972 The newly merged CWRU golf team teed off against Malone College.

April 9
1998 Derek Walcott, 1992 Nobel Laureate for poetry, read poems at Strosacker Auditorium. The event was free and open to the public.

April 11
1930 William E. Wickenden was inaugurated as Case School of Applied Science's third president.
1968 CWRU held its first convocation to honor the memory of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., just a week after the civil rights leader’s assassination.

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William Wickenden inauguration ceremony


April 12
1967 Case Institute of Technology and Western Reserve University Trustees approved the Agreement of Consolidation to combine Case and WRU into a new corporation, Case Western Reserve University.

April 14
1968 WRU’s new Centrex telephone system went into operation. It replaced the PBX system that had been in use since 1928.
1981 CWRU Trustees approved a single diploma design to be used by all CWRU schools.

April 15
1939 The New Chemistry Building of the Case School of Applied Science was dedicated. In 1956, it was named in honor of former Case faculty member Albert W. Smith.

April 16
1969 CWRU Trustees approved the 4-1-4 calendar for the 1969/1970 academic year. Two 15-week semesters would be separated by the month of January devoted to Intersession.
1994 During a ceremony at the Western Reserve Rowing Association, the CWRU Crew Club christened their new racing boat "Agnar Pytte," in honor of CWRU president Agnar Pytte.

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April 17
1966 Gay Gallon completed an 80-hour 1-man marathon radio broadcast on WRAR, setting a new National Collegiate One Man Marathon Broadcasting Record.

April 18
1827 Middle College, the first building on the Hudson campus of Western Reserve College, opened for use.
1870 Nathan Perkins Seymour, longtime Professor of Latin and Greek, was named emeritus upon retirement, the first faculty member at Western Reserve College so honored.
1923 The cornerstone of the School of Medicine's new University Circle home was laid. In 1992, it was named in honor of former faculty member, Harland G. Wood.
1955 Dedication ceremonies were held for the William E. Wickenden Electrical Engineering Building. Wickenden was president of the Case Institute of Technology from 1929 to 1947.

April 19
1996 On newly constructed softball diamonds at Finnigan Fields, the CWRU women's varsity softball team played their first home game, splitting a double-header with Otterbein College. Vice President for Student Affairs Glenn Nicholls threw out the first pitch.

April 20
1974 CWRU faculty/administrators beat members of The Observer staff in a softball game at Finnigan Fields. CWRU President Louis Toepfer, wearing a suit and tie, batted twice in the game going hitless.

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April 21
1950 Groundbreaking ceremonies were held for Case Institute of Technology's first dormitory, Yost Hall.
1984 Backed by freshmen pitcher Tom Sarfi's no-hitter, CWRU beat Hiram College in baseball, 6-0. It was CWRU's first no-hitter.
1990 The Hudson Relays were run for the first time entirely within University Circle. Previously, the Relays were run from the old Western Reserve University campus in Hudson to Cleveland.

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Yost Hall groundbreaking ceremonies


April 22
1998 The Veale Convocation, Recreation and Athletic Center was dedicated. It was named for Tinkham Veale II, who graduated from the Case School of Applied Science in 1937.

April 23
1995 During a ceremony at the Western Reserve Rowing Association, the CWRU Crew Club christened their new racing boat "Leonard Case, Jr.," in honor of Case School of Applied Science founder and benefactor Leonard Case, Jr.
1996 After a $6 million renovation, Rockefeller Physics was rededicated.

April 24
1883 Groundbreaking was held for Case Main, the first University Circle building of Case School of Applied Science.
1942 The annual Hudson Relay was run with bicycles instead of on foot. The class of 1944 won, with a time of 76 minutes.
1948 Case Institute of Technology, led by Coach Ray Ride, debuted its varsity golf program in a loss to Oberlin College.
1955 Western Reserve University broadcast a 90 minute alumni reunion over WEWS-TV.

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April 25
1982 The class of 1982 became the first to win the Hudson Relay four years in a row. CWRU president David Ragone served the team champagne at the Hudson Relay rock after the race.

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April 26
1826 The cornerstone was laid for Middle College, the first building on the Western Reserve College campus in Hudson.
1898 In response to the Spanish-American war, the Voluntary Case Corps of Cadets was organized for military drill exercises at the Case School of Applied Science.

April 27
1968 Robert W. Morse was inaugurated as CWRU's first president.

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April 28
1957 Groundbreaking ceremonies were held for the Newton D. Baker Memorial Building on the corner of Euclid Avenue and Adelbert Road.
1989 A contract was signed between CWRU and TRW, Inc. to begin the installation of CWRUnet, the electronic learning environment.

April 29
1972 After a 2 year hiatus, the Hudson Relay returned. The class of 1974 won, finishing the race in just over 2 hours.
1984 The School of Law ran its own team in the Hudson Relay.
1999 Groundbreaking ceremonies were held for the Peter B. Lewis Building, the new home of the Weatherhead School of Management.

April 30
1972 George Gund Hall, home of the Franklin Thomas Backus School of Law, was dedicated.
1978 Case Institute of Technology students were allowed to participate in the Hudson Relay for the first time.

On This Day in CWRU HIstory: July
On This Day in CWRU HIstory: August
On This Day in CWRU History: September
On This Day in CWRU History: October
On This Day in CWRU History: November
On This Day in CWRU History: December
On This Day in CWRU History: January
On This Day in CWRU History: February
On This Day in CWRU History: March

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March 28, 2018

Women’s History Month Spotlight: Annice Florence Jeffreys Myers, Medical School class of 1883

“A womanly woman with a well-balanced and a well-stored brain, a woman of broad sympathies, keenly alive to the betterment of her kind, whether individually or in the mass, was Mrs. Annice Jeffrys [sic] Myers, wife of Jefferson Myers.” So was the announcement of Annice Florence Jeffreys Myers’ death in an Oregon newspaper.

Annice Florence Jeffreys was born 5/21/1860 in Wayne County, Ohio. While the Medical School graduated 6 of the first 7 women doctors in the U.S., the School was closed to women 1856-1879. On 4/28/1879 the faculty voted to admit women students. Three women graduated, one each in 1880, 1883, and 1884, before medical education was closed again until 1919. Annice Jeffreys was the woman who graduated from the School of Medicine in 1883.

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Annice Florence Jeffreys Myers

After graduation, Dr. Myers practiced medicine for about 16 years - about 7 years in Cleveland before moving to Salem, Oregon where she practiced medicine for around 9 years. While we do not have the exact date in the Archives, she married Jefferson Myers around 1900 or 1901.

In addition to her work as a physician, Dr. Myers was involved in other activities. She was a suffragette serving at the local and national level: vice president at large of the State Equal Suffrage Association and auditor of the National American Women’s Suffrage Association. She was Chairman of the Committee of Arrangements for the 37th Annual Convention of the National American Woman Suffrage Association in Portland in 1905 at the time of the Lewis and Clark Exposition. (Dr. Myers and her husband, who was President of the Lewis and Clark Centennial Exposition Commission, had traveled to the last convention in Washington, D.C. to invite the Association to bring its next meeting to Oregon.) Dr. Myers also served on the Association’s Committee on Congressional Legislation.

She was deeply involved in assisting working women improve their conditions. She helped them gain opportunities for better jobs to become independent. She helped many become nurses “and she opened the way for many to other useful fields.” As one obituary stated, “It was the work of helping girls that occupied most of her time during the last few years, however, and she was planning to organize this work and carry it out on a much larger scale when taken ill last September.”

Dr. Myers died 5/10/1911 in Portland, Oregon. She was survived by her husband, 4 sisters, and 1 brother.

See past Women’s History Month posts from 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017.

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