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January 31, 2017

World War I - summary of WRU campus activity in Spring 1917

The United States officially entered World War I on 4/6/1917. This galvanized actions at Western Reserve University (WRU) and Case School of Applied Science (CSAS).

President Charles F. Thwing
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In the WRU President’s Annual Report for 1916/1917, President Thwing wrote:

“The most outstanding feature of the second part of the academic year is found in the war. Until the declaration of a state of war with Germany was made by the President, the interest of the students in the world-conflict was not great. With the making of the declaration, interest was quickened. The interest of the student community, however, was constantly much greater than that of the general. In this condition, it was the endeavor of the Faculty - an endeavor which still abides - and of the administrative officers, first , to make and maintain the devotion of all students to their immediate duties, and secondly, to recognize with fullness and propriety their relation to their larger fellowship, national and international. The reconciliation and co-working of these two aims has not always been easy, but I think it may be justly affirmed that these two objects have been well ordered and fittingly co-ordinated.

“In respect to the great conflict, the Faculty of Adelbert College have passed these votes:

‘That every possible encouragement by given to the immediate inauguration of voluntary military training among the students, that steps be taken to secure military instructors at once for the remainder of the college year, and that we recommend to the Board of Trustees the appropriation of funds necessary to secure such instructors;

‘That some form of systematic physical training under the direction of the department of Physical Training be required of all students for the remainder of the college year, with the view to making our students physically fit for military service;

‘That in the event of a declaration of war and a call for volunteers by the President of the United State, it be suggested to the Athletic Association of the University that inter-collegiate spring sports be abandoned;

‘That it be recommended to the Trustees that students who enlist and are accepted by the government for service in any branch of warfare be given credit for the remainder of the year;

‘That Commencement exercises of a simple nature be held May 10th or 11th for all Seniors in good standing;

‘That compulsory military training be adopted in Adelbert College for the ensuing year;

‘That for the balance of the present college year the executive committee be authorized to grant leave of absence with credit only to students enrolled in military and Red Cross organizations, and that such leave begin upon receipt of mobilization orders, unless in the judgment of the executive committee earlier leave ought in fairness to be granted in individual cases in order to permit students to visit their homes or to adjust their personal affairs before mobilization;

‘That the executive committee be authorized to reduce the examination period to the shortest time possible consistent with the best interests of the students and the College.’

The significance of these actions is made more impressive by reason of the great number of the students of Adelbert College and the Law School who have enrolled, and also of the formation and departure of the Lakeside Hospital unit. The number of men, who have entered the army, navy, and other service, is in Adelbert College one hundred and sixty-two, and in the Law School fifty-four. The staff of the School of Medicine is represented in the Lakeside Hospital Unit by twelve men.

“These bare figures are replete with meaning. They represent the supreme fact that in the hour of the crises of the nation, or of the nations, the college youths are the first to respond. This University is simply repeating in its way the experience through which American Colleges, both north and south, passed at the time of the Civil War and also through which the universities of England, of France, and of Germany, are passing in the course of the present conflict. This result is not surprising. The highest motives, the noblest purposes, make the most important and strongest appeal to men of the worthiest type.”

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Officers of the first American contingent to arrive in Europe, General Hospital No. 9 (Lakeside Hospital unit)


Spring 1917 activity on the Case campus will appear next month.

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January 30, 2017

Remembering 1997-1998: January 30,1998

The January 30, 1998 issue of The Observer made it clear that CWRU had winter on its mind. The schedule for Winter Carnival included snow flag football and snow volleyball. The Outdoor Wilderness Association planned a winter hike at the Metroparks North Chagrin Reservation. And the Fun Photo of the Week depicted a skier with the caption, Caution: Bare Spots. (I cannot describe this. You will have to look for yourself.)

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Alumnus Fred D. Gray speaks at MLK, Jr. Convocation

Other headlines:
• Trustees announce tuition increase of 3.4 percent
• Asian financial crises affect CWRU students
• Eyes On: Outdoor Wilderness Adventures
• Vote for USG February 3
• Sophomores: sick of CWRU? Found out how to get away
• See new lands with Junior Year Abroad
• Features: Peter Pan soars into Palace Theater; Rapper Ma$e delivers a “fresh” debut album with upbeat, groovy songs
• Cain Park to hold theater auditions
• Sports: Wrestlers take third in Thiel tournament; Swimmers stay strong in the face of defeat; Men attempt to recover from six game slide; Hoopsters begin to slide
• Spartan Spotlight: Gloria Hsieh, senior swimmer

And here's the entire issue: The Observer, 1/30/1998

This is one in a series of weekly blog postings describing what was happening at CWRU, as covered by The Observer, during the years many of the Class of 2020 were born.

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January 25, 2017

CWRU’s Monuments Men

Theodore Sizer and Lester K. Born, former faculty members, were both members of the Monuments, Fine Arts, and Archives (MFAA) subcommission during World War II. The work of this commission to protect monuments and other cultural treasures from destruction was highlighted in the 2014 motion picture film, Monuments Men.

Theodore Sizer served as Lecturer in Art at Adelbert College of Western Reserve University (WRU) in the 1924/25 and 1925/26 academic years. He had received the S.B. cum laude in Fine Arts from Harvard University. Sizer also was Curator of Prints and Oriental Art at Cleveland Museum of Art while in Cleveland, beginning that role in 1921. After leaving Cleveland, he became an Associate Professor of Art History at Yale University. While on the Adelbert College faculty Sizer taught An Introduction to the Fine Arts. See his Monuments Men biography.

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Lester K. Born

Lester K. Born served as Assistant Professor of Classics at Flora Stone Mather College of Western Reserve University 1930-1934. He received the A.B. in 1925 and the M.A. in 1926 from the University of California. He was also a graduate student in Political Science in 1926/27. He served as Graduate Scholar in Classics at Princeton University 1927-1928, receiving the M.A. in 1928. He earned the Ph.D. from the University of Chicago in 1929. Before serving on the faculty at WRU, he was Assistant Professor of Classical Languages at Ohio State University for the 1929/30 academic year. Born taught a variety of Latin classes at WRU over his 4 years. These classes included: Introductory Latin Composition; Horace, Odes and Epodes, Catullus and Martial; Intermediate Latin Composition; Cicero, De Senectute, Seneca, Apocolocytosis, Pliny, Selected Letters, Selections from Latin Poetry; Advanced Latin Composition; Roman Private Life; LIvy; Roman Elegiac Poetry; Translation at Sight; and The Teaching of Latin. Born’s faculty colleagues in the Classics Department included Rachel L. Sargent, Clarence Bill, Robert S. Rogers, and Kenneth Scott. See his Monuments Men biography. One of Born's published accounts of his service appeared in The American Archivist, July 1950 issue.

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January 17, 2017

Remembering 1997-1998: January 16,1998

In the first issue of the new semester, The Observer editors offered some New Year’s resolutions to CWRU: implement computerized registration, allow juniors to live off campus, end the mandatory meal plan, implement standardized training for academic advisors, administrative offices should not close during the lunch hour.

“If CWRU can follow just one or two of the above suggestions, the student population would be most grateful.”

Headlines in the January 16, 1998 issue included:
• Clinton declares MLK Jr. Day to be day ‘on’ service
• Student sexually assaulted on Case Quad New Year’s Day
• Sororities kick off rush
• Eyes On Downhill Ski and Snowboard Club
• ZBT Hosts Casino Night
• Dunbar speaks at CWRU
• New deans come and go with the new year
• WSOM’s Cowen prepares for Tulane
• CWRU professor questions Martian nanobacteria
• Letters to the editor: Kwanzaa deserves to be considered “religious”; Kwanzaa belongs in Holiday Festival; Treat students with respect
• Exhibit celebrates African-American heritage
• Sports: Spartans thrive as coach nears milestone; New year brings new hope for Spartans; Wrestlers compete in Heidelberg tournament; Spartan Spotlight: Joe Dietrich, civil engineering senior, wrestling & track

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Fun Page Photo of the Week: snowflakes taste good…

And here's the entire issue: The Observer, 1/16/1998

This is one in a series of weekly blog postings describing what was happening at CWRU, as covered by The Observer, during the years many of the Class of 2020 were born.

Posted by jmt3 at 01:49 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

January 12, 2017

Title: Remembering 1997-1998: The Journalists

Last semester many of our blog postings described what was happening at CWRU during the 1997/98 academic year, as covered by our student newspaper, The Observer. We chose 1997/98 because those are the years many of this year's freshmen (Class of 2020) were born, We’ll continue that project in the spring semester.

The focus of those highlights has been on the stories, rather than the story-tellers. So, I’m taking this opportunity to salute the 1997/98 fall semester Observer staff who were responsible for this important record of the university’s history.

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Masthead from the December 5, 1997 issue of The Observer.

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