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June 29, 2018

Energy Conservation on Campus - 40 years ago

In the 1970s the university was dealing with the energy crisis as were individuals at home. Amid skyrocketing costs and shortages, the university imposed measures to conserve energy. Utilities costs rose dramatically. As reported in News & Views 11/1/1974, CWRU used less energy in 1973/74 than 1972/73. “Campus facilities (excluding housing) used nearly two million fewer kilowatts of electricity, cut use of steam by some 30 million pounds, and reduced gas consumption by about 31 thousand cubic feet. These are impressive figures--until you realize that the total cost for utilities was about $60,000 higher in fiscal ‘73-’74 than a year earlier despite these substantial cutbacks. This ironic situation is explained by the major increases in the cost of energy in all forms which hit consumers, including CWRU, throughout the first half of calendar 1974.”

Utility costs continued to rise throughout the 1970s and 1978 saw the university impose strict measures in the wake of a nationwide 16 week coal strike. During the winter of 1977-1978 blizzard conditions caused the university to be closed for 2 days, believed to be the first for a snow closure since 1950. The storm caused some broken windows,roof damage and ruptured pipes, but the overall damage was less than anticipated. The university was able to operate almost normally through the winter and the coal strike because the Medical Center Company had stockpiled a sufficient amount of coal to heat the campus. Supplies of electricity were more critical. The Cleveland Electric Illuminating Company unveiled a plan to reduce consumption by 20% for individuals and institutions. On 2/14/1978 CWRU issued its first statement about voluntary energy cutbacks in News & Views. Effective Wednesday, 2/15/1978:

“1. Lights will be turned off in all rooms having a window or windows between 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
2. All space heaters, radios and other electric devices not directly used in accomplishing work-related tasks will be turned off.
3. The University Bookstore will close at 5:00 p.m. instead of 6:00 p.m. weekdays.
4. University facilities will not be available to off-campus groups.”

Building monitors were assigned to each campus building to enforce the first 2 procedures. These were mandatory procedures that all employees were expected to comply with. In addition, some elevators were shut down and outdoor lighting cut back. The university realized approximately 18% savings from these measures by 3/9/1978. Ohio Governor James Rhodes requested all Ohioans conserve at least 25% of their normal electrical usage, leading the university to its second phase of energy reductions. According to News & Views (3/9/1978) these procedures went into effect Saturday, 3/11/1978:

“1. Libraries will begin operating with reduced hours. Specific hours will be announced next week.
2. The three campus gymnasia will be open daytime hours only.
3. Elevators in all dormitories (except high rise buildings) and many other buildings will be turned off.
4. Reductions in air handling equipment and lab hoods will be continued.
5. Lights will be turned off in most non-dormitory parking lots.
6. Non-work related electrical equipment, including coffee pots (underlined) and certain vending machines should be turned off.
7. Use of copy machines should be limited, whenever possible. Copy machines should be turned off when not in use.
8. Use of University auditoriums by off-campus groups will be canceled.”

The first phase of energy saving procedures remained in effect.

By late March the coal strike was settled. The 3/27/1978 issue of News & Views reported that CWRU did its part to reduce energy consumption during the latter 5 weeks of the strike. Use of electricity was reduced campus-wide by approximately 20-25 percent. Vice President Musselman thanked faculty, staff, and students for their cooperation during the emergency energy cutback. Musselman stated, “We learned some things during these cutbacks. We identified some areas of excessive use of electricity, where the cutbacks will become permanent parts of our ongoing conservation efforts....With the receipt of this notice Phase I and II mandatory cutbacks are cancelled. However, I want to emphasize again that conservation of energy has become a way of life and the University must continue to do its part to eliminate all excessive and unnecessary consumption of electricity. Everyone give a little thought to this fact of life, before automatically turning on lights and appliances that have been off, and perhaps not badly missed.”

All the elevators shut down during the crisis were restored to service.

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Medical Center Company air pollution control device installed at the power plant in 1978. It was referred to as the Bag House.

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June 05, 2018

On This Day in CWRU History: June

Below is the last month of our list of significant dates in CWRU’s history. The list is not comprehensive and we invite suggestions of other dates to include.

June 1
1978: CWRU Trustees established the John S. Diekhoff Award for Distinguished Graduate Teaching.

June 2
1960: Mei Mei Wang became the first woman awarded a Ph.D. from the Case Institute of Technology. Dr. Wang also received her M.S. in Chemical Engineering from Case in 1958.

June 5
1939: Fred Easly Sheibley received the first Ph.D. conferred by Case School of Applied Science.
1997: The Campus Greens, location of Philip Johnson's sculpture Turning Point, was dedicated.

June 8
1905: Ambrose Swasey, longtime trustee of the Case School of Applied Science and Western Reserve University, received the honorary Doctor of Engineering degree, the first honorary degree awarded by CSAS.

June 9
1955: Millicent C. McIntosh, president, Barnard College, and dean, Columbia University received an honorary degree from Case Institute of Technology, the only woman to receive that honor.

June 10
1890: Western Reserve University and Case School of Applied Science participated in their first track meet, competing with Mt. Union and Hiram Colleges. Held at the YMCA Park in Cleveland, WRU won the meet.

June 11
1901: Haydn Hall's cornerstone was laid. Named in honor of former WRU president Hiram Haydn. Haydn Hall opened as a women's dormitory.
1908: The cornerstone for the Morley Chemistry Laboratory was laid. The building was named in honor of former WRU faculty member Edward Morley.
1911: Amasa Stone Chapel, named in honor of Cleveland businessman Amasa Stone, was dedicated.
1913: Cleveland mayor Newton D. Baker spoke at Western Reserve University's College for Women commencement ceremony. His speech was entitled, "The Place of a College for Women in a Great City."
1929: Western Reserve University Trustees approved an affiliation with the Cleveland School of Architecture.
1935: Western Reserve University Trustees renamed the School of Nursing in honor of U. S. Congresswoman Frances Payne Bolton.
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Frances Payne Bolton

June 12
1923: Western Reserve University Trustees established the School of Nursing.
1935: Olive Baxter Stevens became the first woman to graduate from the School of Architecture, six years after its affiliation with Western Reserve University.

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Hudson Relay, 1910

June 13
1900: The cornerstone was laid for Harkness Chapel, Western Reserve University's first chapel building. It was named in honor of Florence Harkness Severance.
1910: The Hudson Relay was run for the first time. The class of 1912 won, with a finish time of 2 hours and 1 minute.
1912: Four years after the Cleveland School of Pharmacy affiliated with Western Reserve University, Birdie Rehmer became its first woman graduate.
1934: Winfred G. Leutner was inaugurated as Western Reserve University's eighth president, and was the only alumnus to serve as president of WRU.
1961: Aaron Strauss was the first recipient of the Kent H. Smith award, awarded to the outstanding engineering senior, who "displays extraordinary qualities of leadership, character, and scholarship."
1992: Karen Horn was elected as the first woman chair of the CWRU Board of Trustees

June 14
1911: The cornerstone was laid for Flora Stone Mather Memorial Building. It became the main administration building for Flora Stone Mather College.
1929: The cornerstone for the Institute of Pathology was laid.
1957:
Camp Case
, in Mohican State Forest near Loudonville, Ohio, closed. It served as a summer survey camp for Case Institute of Technology students for 21 years.
June 15
1885: Case School of Applied Science held its first commencement, graduating 5 men. It was held at the Case Hall Auditorium in downtown Cleveland.
1896: Hatch Library was dedicated. It was Western Reserve University's first building solely used as a library.
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Camp Case, Mohican State Forest

1896: The cornerstone ceremonies were held for the Franklin Thomas Backus School of Law building on the corner of Adelbert Road and Circle Drive.
1911: Western Reserve University's commencement convocation was held for the first time at the newly-constructed Amasa Stone Chapel.
1932: Western Reserve University's commencement convocation was held for the first time at the newly-constructed Severance Hall.

June 16
1910: Lucy Gertrude Hoffman became the first woman graduate of Western Reserve University's Dental School, eighteen years after the School's establishment.
1915: Mather House was dedicated. It opened as a dorm for female undergraduate students.
1921: Hannah Mirsky became the first woman graduate of Western Reserve University's Franklin Thomas Backus School of Law.
1926: Florence Ellinwood Allen, Ohio Supreme Court Justice and a graduate of Western Reserve University's College for Women in 1904, gave the first of her three commencement speeches at WRU's College for Women.
1927: Herbert M. Knowles was the only member of the first graduating class of Western Reserve University's Cleveland College.
1948: Carl Wittke, long time Western Reserve University faculty member and dean of the Graduate School, spoke for the first of sixteen times at a WRU commencement ceremony.

June 17
1895: The cornerstone was laid for Hatch Library. It was Western Reserve University's first building solely used as a library.
1909: The cornerstone of Amasa Stone Chapel was laid. The chapel was named in honor of Cleveland businessman Amasa Stone.
1996: The Kelvin Smith Library officially opened.

June 18
1895: Mary Noyes Colvin, who in 1895 became the first woman to receive a Ph.D. from Western Reserve University, was the main speaker at WRU's commencement.
1993: The Richard F. Celeste Biomedical Research Building was dedicated.

June 19
1888: Western Reserve University Trustees approved an affiliation with the Western Reserve School of Design for Women, which was renamed the School of Art.
1898: Dedication ceremonies for Eldred Hall were held. Eldred Hall was the first student union of Adelbert College.

June 21
1897: Cornerstone was laid for Eldred Hall. Eldred Hall was the first student union of Adelbert College.

June 23
1991:
Fire gutted Adelbert Hall,
the oldest campus building. It took two years to rebuild the historic structure.
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June 24
1994: The Health Sciences Center was renamed the Louis Stokes Health Sciences Center.

June 26
1872: Carroll Cutler was inaugurated as Western Reserve College's fourth president.

June 28
1876: Viola Smith Buell became the first woman to graduate from Western Reserve College, fifty years after its establishment.

June 30
1949: The School of Pharmacy at Western Reserve University closed.


On This Day in CWRU HIstory: July
On This Day in CWRU HIstory: August
On This Day in CWRU History: September
On This Day in CWRU History: October
On This Day in CWRU History: November
On This Day in CWRU History: December
On This Day in CWRU History: January
On This Day in CWRU History: February
On This Day in CWRU History: March
On This Day in CWRU History: April
On This Day in CWRU History: May

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