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July 31, 2018

Faculty involvement in the community - 1968

Many reflections and commemorations have been taking place this year as it is 50 years since the events of 1968. Here is a look back at how faculty members at CWRU were involved in several community related activities in 1968.

Faculty Families Needed to Tutor in Hough - reads a heading in the 5/3/1968 Faculty Announcements.
“Faculty and their families are needed to tutor children in the Hough area for this spring and summer. The Cleveland Tutorial Project has a waiting list of over 300 elementary to high school age students who have asked for tutors. The tutor is matched with one tutee; the tutor selects the age level and subjects in which he would like to tutor. The actual tutoring takes place in a church or recreation center near the tutee’s home one night a week.

“Age is no real barrier - a professor can tutor as well as his 13-year-old son. CTP would like to encourage more faculty families to participate. As a chemistry professor whose entire family has become involved in the project comments, ‘The rewards are presumably the same for tutors of all ages. For us parents, who are teachers anyhow, there is the luxury of devoting full attention to a single student, and in marshaling all our resourcefulness to deal with the unfolding responses...’”

The Poor People’s Campaign - the midwest caravan was scheduled to arrive in Cleveland Saturday, 5/11/1968 on its trip to Washington, D.C. Faculty and students were sought to volunteer to help the week of 5/13. “The response of those faculty offering to house the members of the march has been excellent.” Volunteers also donated food, performed office work and served as guides.

Cleveland: Now! - from 5/24 to 8/9, faculty, staff, and students contributed $12,900 to the Cleveland: NOW! campaign. As reported in the 5/24/1968 Faculty Announcements, “Although the University has long had a policy of soliciting employees for only one fund drive, United Appeal, each year, President Morse has endorsed the Cleveland: NOW! appeal and is asking members of the faculty and staff to support the fund drive.

Salaried employees were asked to give one day’s pay and hourly employees were being asked to give one hour’s pay. “The future of the University and the future of the city of Cleveland are closely linked. The Cleveland: Now! campaign is the first major step in getting Cleveland rolling.” On Tuesday, 8/6, Provost Alan R. Moritz presented Mayor Carl B. Stokes with a check for $12,900.

Upward Bound Program (a pre-college program for low-income and potential first-generation college students) - faculty members met informally with small groups of Upward Bound students to share information regarding their particular areas of specialization. Faculty members could also work with Upward Bound summer teachers in organizing learning experiences.

In January 1968 President Morse announced the creation of the University Urban Affairs Committee. The functions of the committee were: to review proposals seeking interdepartmental cooperation on problems of teaching, research, or service programs related to urban affairs; to act as clearinghouse of information about all academic projects within the university pertaining to urban affairs; to initiate and develop within the university interdepartmental research, service or educational activities appropriate to University’s increasing role in the urban field. The committee’s duties were refined throughout the course of the year. Louis A. Toepfer, then dean of the Law School, became chair in August and was also temporary director of the newly formed Office of Community Affairs.

As reported in Faculty Announcements, President Morse stated, “It is a fact of life that urban universities can only realize their goals and ambitions as educational institutions if the urban areas in which they are located can solve the agonizing social and economic problems they face. Urban universities have an obligation to their communities to contribute to creative solutions to these problems.”

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July 12, 2018

Mini-History of the School of Architecture

The School of Architecture was one of several Western Reserve University schools that existed prior to becoming part of the University. It is also one of our schools that had a separate existence as a deparment after the school was closed. The sketch below outlines some of the school’s history. The focus is on 1929 till 1953, while it was a Western Reserve University school.

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School of Architecture Class of 1929

Some Key Dates
1921 Cleveland Chapter of the American Institute of Architects began supporting a course in architecture
1924 Cleveland School of Architecture was incorporated
1929 Cleveland School of Architecture affiliated with Western Reserve University
6/13/1929 First degrees, Bachelor of Architecture, conferred on eight graduates, by Western Reserve University
9/17/1929 First School of Architecture classes were offered as part of Western Reserve University
1941 Cleveland School of Architecture was renamed the School of Architecture
1953 School of Architecture closed. The Department of Architecture continued almost 20 years, closing in 1972
6/10/1953 The School of Architecture’s last commencement ceremony was held, at which 15 graduates received the Bachelor of Architecture.
1929-1953 Frances R. Bacon was Dean of the School of Architecture for its entire life as a school of Western Reserve University

Curriculum
The 1929/30 catalog lists over 40 architecture courses, including Elements of Architecture, Cast Drawing, History of Architecture, Theory of Design, and more. Students also took classes in English, Math, Physics, and French.

Degrees Offered and Awarded
1929/30-1940/41 Bachelor of Architecture offered
1941/42-1942/43 Bachelor of Science offered
1943/44-1952/53 Bachelor of Architecture offered
1929-1953 nearly 200 undergraduate degrees were awarded by the School of Architecture.
Adelbert, Mather, and Cleveland Colleges also offered the Bachelor of Architecture degree. The Master of Arts degree in architecture was offered by the School of Graduate Studies.

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Architecture students constructing models

Tuition
1929/30-1945/46 $300/year with an estimated materials cost of $50
1946/47-1947/48 $12.50/credit hour
1948/49 $14/credit hour
1949/50-1952/53 $16/credit hour

Enrollment
1929-1953 total of 1,623 students enrolled; average of 67 annually
1943/44 low enrollment: 11 students
1948/49 high enrollment: 114 students

Locations
1927-1930 11015 Euclid Avenue
1930-1945 Garfield House at 11206 Euclid Avenue
1945-1953 Pierce Hall

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