« July 2018 | Main | September 2018 »

August 31, 2018

School of Medicine’s 100th Anniversary Celebration

As the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine celebrates its 175th anniversary this year, let us look back at the 100th anniversary celebration held in 1943.

Planning for the centennial began in 1938 when President Leutner appointed a committee “to consider and to lay plans for a celebration of the One Hundredth Anniversary of the School of Medicine.” Arthur D. Baldwin served as honorary chair and Howard T. Karsner served as chair. Committee members included Robert H. Bishop, Jr., Mrs. A. A. Brewster, Victor C. Myers, Frank A. Scott, Torald Sollmann (Dean of the School) with President Leutner serving ex officio. Members added to the committee included Harold E. Adams, Willis E. Corry, James C. Gray, Harold D. Green, William W. Hurst, Edward Muntwyler, and E. D. Whittlesey.

Originally the celebration was planned for 4/5-4/6/1943 in conjunction with the meeting of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (which was planned to meet in Cleveland). However, this meeting was cancelled because of the war. The Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) was meeting in Cleveland on 10/25-10/26. It was thought by the planning committee that the AAMC meeting would be held “because the work of the Association is directly concerned with the war program, and certainly will not be proscribed by the Office of Defense Transportation.” The centennial celebration was scheduled for Wednesday and Thursday, 10/27 and 10/28. The days were packed with activities as seen in the program. (Download pdf)

05304D1.jpgWednesday began with a scholarly lecture, “Blood Plasma Proteins, Their Production, Function, Substitution and Replacement,” by Dr. George H. Whipple, Dean of the School of Medicine and Dentistry at the University of Rochester. A buffet luncheon followed for delegates to the centennial celebration and delegates for the AAMC meeting and invited speakers. The University Convocation was held in Severance Hall at 3:30 p.m. An academic procession led by President Leutner entered through the front entrance with an honor guard of medical students enlisted in the Navy and Army lining the steps. In addition to the president, deans, faculty members, Medical School students in uniform, and 159 delegates from colleges and universities, national societies, state societies and philanthropic foundations made up the procession. After the National Anthem and the invocation were 2 addresses. Howard Karsner, professor of Pathology and director of the Institute of Pathology, spoke on “The Public Service of the School of Medicine.” Dr. Alan Gregg, Director for the Medical Sciences at the Rockefeller Foundation, gave the address “The Matrix of Medicine.” Honorary degrees were awarded to 5 people: William Thomas Corlett (Doctor of Humanities), Reginald Fitz (Doctor of Science), Torald Sollmann (Doctor of Laws), Frederick Clayton Waite (Doctor of Humanities), George Hoyt Whipple (Doctor of Science). Dr. Gregg, though nominated, was unable to receive the degree because of the policies of the Rockefeller Foundation. At the convocation President Leutner announced “the gift of a fund of $50,000 by the Board of Trustees of the Cleveland Clinic Foundation, the income to be devoted to fellowships in surgery for postgraduate students chosen by the Faculty of Medicine of the University. The fund is to be named for Drs. Frank E. Bunts, George Crile, Sr., and William E. Lower, former members of the Faculty, who founded the Cleveland Clinic in 1921.”

Following the convocation was the One Hundredth Anniversary Celebration Dinner. Dr. Karsner served as toastmaster. Cleveland Mayor Frank J. Lausche gave a welcome, followed by President Leutner who gave a brief history of the School, and then Dean Sollmann who gave an address of welcome which featured a poem written by Emilie Chamberlin Conklin in honor of the celebration. The main address, “The Crimson Thread,” was given by Reginald Fitz, Lecturer on the History of Medicine at Harvard University Medical School.

The Thursday program - a series of lectures given primarily by alumni - was organized by the alumni. It concluded with Dean Sollmann’s address, “Farewell 1943, Hail 2043.” That date is now only 25 years away!

Graduation exercises were held Thursday afternoon. Because of the war, the Medical School was operating under a compressed schedule and 2 classes graduated in 1943 - one in February and one in October. The Alumni Banquet was held in the evening. It featured a business meeting and election of officers of the Alumni Association, the reception of the graduating class into the Alumni Association, and 2 addresses, including university historian and professor emeritus Frederick C. Waite talking about “Episodes in One Hundred Years” of the Medical School.

For 3 weeks the Cleveland Health Museum hosted an exhibit co-sponsored by the Cleveland Medical Library Association and the Western Reserve Historical Society, “100 Years of Medicine.” A preview of the exhibit was held the evening of Tuesday, 10/26. Chauncey D. Leake, Dean of the Medical School at the University of Texas gave a talk, “Milestones in Medicine,” illustrated with lantern slides. Guided tours were provided by Dr. Howard Dittrick, Director of the Museum of Historical Medicine of The Cleveland Medical Library Association.

MEDExhibitInvitation-resized.jpg
Invitation to the exhibit preview

Coverage of the events appeared in various newspapers such as The Plain Dealer and Cleveland Press,The Clevelander, the Clinical Bulletin of the School of Medicine, the Bulletin of the Academy of Medicine, in the Reserve Tribune student newspaper of 11/12/1943(Download pdf) and the alumni newsletter Voice of Reserve. There was also a radio tribute and a broadcast speech by Dr. Harry Goldblatt.

Chairman of the Centennial Committee Howard Karsner concluded in his final report on the Centennial, “Many communications have been received from those who attended the celebration and all have spoken in highly complimentary terms of the occasion. The fact that the country is at war limited the exercises to a considerable degree, but in spite of the handicaps and difficulties, it may be said that the celebration of the One Hundredth Anniversary of the School of Medicine, Western Reserve University, was wholly successful.

Posted by hxy2 at 06:38 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

August 15, 2018

Mini-History of the School of Education

In her 1938 “History of the School of Education,” Helen Harris Graebner wrote,” Perhaps the history of the present School of Education of Western Reserve University could best be expressed by a jig-saw puzzle - so many elements have gone into its making and so complicated does its story seem.”

Ms. Graebner was absolutely correct. The simplest part of the story is that Western Reserve University had a School of Education from 1928/29 through 1944/45. The more complicated antecedents are outlined in the timeline below.

EducationStudentLife_1937.jpg L'Annee_1937.jpg
School of Education students depicted in 1937 yearbook, L'Annee

Some Key Dates
1874 Cleveland Normal Training School was established by the Cleveland Board of Education.
1894 Cleveland Kindergarten Training School was established.
1915 A joint summer program between WRU and the Cleveland School of Education was established.
1916 Education Department was established in the College for Women.
1919 Cleveland Normal Training School was renamed the Cleveland School of Education.
1920 The joint summer program was renamed the Senior Teacher's College of Western Reserve University and the Cleveland School of Education.
1922 Cleveland Kindergarten Training School was renamed Kindergarten-Primary Training School.
1927 Department of Nursery-Kindergarten-Primary Training was established by WRU after the program was transferred by the Cleveland Day Nursery and Free Kindergarten Association of Cleveland.
1928 School of Education was established by WRU, combining the College for Women Education Department, the Nursery-Kindergarten-Primary Training Department, the Cleveland School of Education, and the Senior Teacher’s College of WRU and the Cleveland School of Education.
1945 School of Education closed.
1979 The successor Department of Education closed.

Curriculum
In its early years the school offered three curricula: Kindergarten-Primary, Intermediate Grades, Junior-Senior High School Grades. Over time additional curricula were added: Art Education, Music Education, Commercial Education, Industrial Arts, and Nursery School. During the early 1930s a program in Library Service for Children was offered with the School of Library Science.

Degrees Offered and Awarded
In 1928/29 the school offered both 2-year and 3-year diplomas and 4-year degree programs. From 1928/29 through 1944/45 the degree offered was the Bachelor of Science. The diploma programs ended in the mid-1930s.
Master’s and doctoral education degrees (Ed.D., M.A.Ed., Ed.M.) were offered by the School of Graduate Studies.
From 1929 through 1945 the school awarded 2,151 degrees, ranging from 51 in 1929 to 209 in 1939.

Tuition
1928/29-1935/36: $250/year
1936/37-1942/43: $300/year
1943/44-1944/45: $10/credit hour

Enrollment
From 1928/29 through 1944/45 enrollment in the school totaled 10,202, ranging from 260 in 1935/36 to 1,139 in 1938/39. Enrollment peaked at over 1,000 in four years 1936/37-1939/40.

Deans
1928-1933 Charles W. Hunt
1933-1945 Harry N. Irwin

Locations
1928/29-1935/36: 2060 Stearns Road
1936/37-1944/45: 11217 Bellflower Road

Posted by jmt3 at 12:39 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

August 03, 2018

The 1975-1976 Commemorative Year: CWRU’s 150th Anniversary

During the 1975-1976 academic year, CWRU celebrated its sesquicentennial, commemorating 150 years since the State of Ohio granted the charter to establish Western Reserve College in Hudson, Ohio on 2/7/1826. Since 1976 marked both the sesquicentennial, and the United States Bicentennial, the Board of Trustees designated the academic year 1975-1976 as the university’s “commemorative year.” In honor of the occasion, the CWRU community celebrated with a year-long series of events.

The festivities kicked off during the fall of 1975. On 10/19/1975, ceremonies celebrating the founding of Western Reserve College took place at Western Reserve Academy in Hudson, Ohio. Known as the “Hudson Pilgrimage,” this event included a walking tour of the Academy and historical sites in Hudson, a Glee Club musical performance, and a picnic. The Hudson Pilgrimage was followed by the Commemorative Year Opening Festival on 10/25/1975, which included a ceremony to dedicate the banners for CWRU’s Schools and Colleges that took place at Amasa Stone Chapel. The dedication ceremony consisted of classical music performances, the presentation of the bicentennial flag, an address on the evolution of the university given by Chancellor Emeritus, John Schoff Millis, the presentation of the banners, and an address by President Louis Toepfer.

01517D1.jpg
Dedication of the Banners

The recognition of the commemorative year was not exclusive to Cleveland. In honor of the sesquicentennial, President Toepfer invited several nationally prominent individuals in higher education and national affairs to assist the CWRU community in reflecting upon the university’s and the nation’s past and future by serving as guest lecturers. One such individual was James B. Reston, a well-known New York Times columnist, who was invited to serve as a visiting Sesquicentennial Professor from 11/10/1975 to 11/21/1975. In addition, part of the year’s celebrations included events for alumni and friends that were held in key cities across the country in order to highlight the role that CWRU played in American education for 150 years, not only in Ohio, but across the nation. One such event was a reception hosted by President Toepfer and his wife, Alice Toepfer, for all alumni and Congressional representatives in Washington D.C. at the United States Botanical Garden on 10/20/1975. Another event was a Sesquicentennial Weekend for alumni and friends that took place at The York Club in New York City from 11/14/1975 to 11/16/1975. The weekend included a dinner and dance on Friday night, and a symposium on Saturday and Sunday that was conducted by key faculty members, and focused on Science and Technology, Medicine, and The Renaissance Man. Other cities across the country that held similar events for CWRU alumni and friends included Pittsburgh, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Chicago, Akron, Youngstown, Canton, Toledo, Dayton, and Philadelphia.

02102D1.jpg
President Louis A. Toepfer

Activities and events in honor of the commemorative year continued into 1976, beginning with a Festival of Arts and Sciences that was held on campus in January and February. The festival featured lectures from prominent faculty members, a bicentennial exhibit at Mather Gallery, musical presentations, a winter dance program, art history programs, and a theatrical performance. The sesquicentennial celebration also included the recognition of Charter Day, to commemorate the day when the university was founded. Held on 2/15/1976, the Charter Day Convocation included brunch for the university governing boards and special guests, the presentation of the University medal and new University Fellows, and introduced the new history of CWRU. This important work was written by Professor Emeritus of History, C. H. Cramer, who delivered the keynote address for the convocation, entitled “Reflections on a Sesquicentennial.”

02101D1.jpg
Charter Day Convocation

Discussions regarding the creation of an official institutional history began after Federation in 1967. To that end, the first CWRU president, Robert Morse, outlined a project to write such a history, which was recommended by the University Chancellor and approved by the trustees. When he assumed the presidency in 1970, President Toepfer continued the project. In 1972, Secretary of the University Carolyn Neff and University Archivist Ruth Helmuth recommended that the history should be published to coincide with the university sesquicentennial, and they recommended Professor Cramer as the most suitable historian to complete this work. Throughout the early 1970s, President Toepfer actively supported Cramer’s efforts by encouraging professors from various departments across campus to use their knowledge of departmental histories to aid in his research. Carolyn Neff oversaw the project to completion in time for the sesquicentennial by serving as the administrative coordinator.

02733D1.jpg
Clarence H. "Red" Cramer

Commemorative year celebrations continued into the spring of 1976, beginning with a Festival of American Jazz in March, in which concerts were given by area colleges’ jazz bands. On 4/28/1976, Alice Toepfer hosted a walking tour of CWRU campus buildings, ranging from Adelbert to Gund Hall. The tour began at Amasa Stone Chapel, and included tea in the Mather Gallery, which housed an exhibit on the sesquicentennial that featured the University Print Club Collection and pieces of Victorian furniture from Guilford House.

In early May 1976, the spring term ended with the University Showcase, which included alumni reunions, departmental open houses, University Circle tours, an antique car show, a flea market, and the Hudson Relay. In addition to the traditional Hudson Relay, a new event, the first annual Western Reserve Marathon, took place on 5/9/1976, and was sponsored by CWRU in honor of its 150th birthday, in cooperation with Revco Drug Centers, Inc. The marathon was run over the challenging and historic Hudson Relay course, which stretches 26 miles and 385 yards between Hudson and Cleveland. It was also considered an official United States Bicentennial event, and was open to all amateur athletes who carried a valid AAU (Amateur Athletic Union) registration card and a current medical certificate. Everyone who finished the Western Reserve Marathon was given a souvenir award, and running shirts were provided to all official entrants.

02254D1.jpg
Hudson Relay, 1976

During the commemorative year, CWRU enrolled nearly 8,000 students in two undergraduate colleges, a graduate school, and seven professional schools: Applied Social Sciences, Dentistry, Law, Library Science, Management, Medicine, and Nursing. In order to continue to improve upon the university’s mission “to prepare its students for a life of learning and professional responsibility by advancing knowledge and understanding through scholarship and research,” CWRU took an important step in addressing the future in honor of the sesquicentennial by announcing a $215-million capital campaign in 1976, called the Resources campaign, to raise funds for endowment and operations support. By the end of its five-year timeline in 1981, one year after President Toepfer’s retirement, the campaign goal was reached, and slightly exceeded.

For more information about the sesquicentennial and commemorative year events, please consult the University Archives. In addition, the digital exhibit “180 Events from 180 Years” on the Archives' website provides a useful timeline of CWRU history, and was created to celebrate the 180th anniversary in 2006. We look forward to celebrating the university’s bicentennial in 2026!

Written by Julia Teran

Posted by hxy2 at 03:35 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack