Entries for April 13, 2006

FreeMind - Free Mind Mapping Software

SourceForge.net highlighted FreeMind as its February 2006 Project of the Month. FreeMind is mind-mapping software, or a tree editor. With it, you can create foldable trees of plain text notes, enriched with colors, icons, cloud-shapes, and other graphics. Folding and breadth-width search make it valuable as a knowledge base tool.

[About SourceForge.net]

SourceForge.net is the world's largest Open Source software development web site, hosting more than 100,000 projects and over 1,000,000 registered users with a centralized resource for managing projects, issues, communications, and code. SourceForge.net has the largest repository of Open Source code and applications available on the Internet, and hosts more Open Source development products than any other site or network worldwide. SourceForge.net provides a wide variety of services to projects we host, and to the Open Source community. See more here...

Track Biomedical Papers Being Discussed by Bloggers

Postgenomic collates posts from life science blogs and then does useful and interesting things with that data. For example, you can see which papers are currently being discussed by neurologists, or which web pages are being linked to by bioinformaticians. It's sort of like a hot papers meeting with the entire biomed blogging community.

A RSS feed is available to track the "Posts of the day", "Current hot stories", or "Current hot papers".

[About Postgenomic]

Postgenomic aggregates posts from life science blogs and then does useful and interesting things with that data.

For example, it allows you to get an instant picture of which web sites are being heavily linked to by researchers in the medical sciences, or which papers are being cited or reviewed most often by bioinformaticians, or which buzzwords are being used the most frequently by evolutionary biologists.

It's sort of like a hot papers meeting with the entire biomed blogging community.

Sort of.

Postgenomic's primary purpose is to act as a central repository for reviews of scientific papers and for conference reports. You can help with this by adding some very simple semantic markup to your blog posts when you write a review of a paper. In this context a "review" isn't necessarily a particularly long or critical assessment of the paper (though it could be): it's simply any information that other researchers might find useful.

(Originally shared on the Science Library Pad, March 3, 2006)