Entries for April 26, 2006

Me & Web 2.0

I guess this is an extension of my earlier introduction.

Since I am sure we are all at different levels of technology usage and knowledge, I thought I would post about my technology usage.

I am high on anything that will increase my productivity while supporting mobility. I have two offices on my campus, one in the main library and one in the School of Engineering, and I also drive about 80 miles per day. At work, I rely solely on a laptop. As our campus is totally wireless and I have docking stations in both offices, I can basically work from anywhere that is needed. I will often travel to faculty offices or student study areas to assist or instruction in research, and I can conveniently take my "whole" office with me. I also use a Dell Axim X50v handheld that supports wireless access, email, video, various applications, etc. I can throw it in my pocket and access the library catalog from within the stacks, listen to music while wlaking across campus, or access an urgent email to share with others during a meeting. I love my Axim.

My university supports both a blog system and wiki. I do maintain a work-related weblog (e3 Information Overload, E-resources for Engineering Education) that highlights resources or issues relevant to science and engineering faculty and students. I also add content to other library blogs within my organization, a Reference Weblog and general library news Weblog. The library offers various RSS feeds. I do not participate as much in the wiki, as I have not learned the editing structure yet and it is not straight forward from a user perspective.

I use Pluck to read RSS feeds as it offers the ability to go back and forth from an application on my computer to web-based access as needed. I look forward to seeing how BlogBridge compares. I am also experimenting with Attensa as it work with Microsoft Office.

EECS Professor Awarded $1.2 Million for Bioinformatics Research

Jing Li, an assistant professor with the electrical engineering and computer science department, was recently awarded a National Institutes of Health R01 grant for approximately $1.2 million to be used for interdisciplinary research in bioinformatics and computational biology.

(Source: Case Daily, April, 20, 2006.)

Minority Degrees in Science, Technology, Engineering & Math

Increasing the Success of Minority Students in Science and Technology by the American Council on Education (ACE) on April, 3, 2006

African American and Hispanic students begin college interested in majoring in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) fields at rates similar to those of white and Asian-American students, and persist in these fields through their third year of study, but do not earn their bachelor’s degrees at the same rate as their peers, according to a new analysis conducted by the American Council on Education (ACE).
See full press release for more data.

(Originally shared on the Curious Cat Science & Engineering Blog on April, 21, 2006.)

[About ACE]

Founded in 1918, the American Council on Education (ACE) is the nation's unifying voice for higher education. ACE serves as a consensus leader on key higher education issues and seeks to influence public policy through advocacy, research, and program initiatives. See more at About ACE.