Entries for April 2006

April 30, 2006

Online Seminars Offer Tips on Searching IEEE Digital Library

Learn to better use one of Case's Library Resources, IEEE Xplore.

Users of IEEE online technical information who are looking to improve their research skills may benefit from attending an online "Searching with IEEE Xplore" seminar. Event dates for April and May have been announced. IEEE hosts regularly scheduled online seminars and training events, which are free to all. Advance registration is required, and space is limited. To sign up, visit: www.ieee.org/products/onlinepubs/form/free_training_form.html.

April 27, 2006

Journal@rchive - Electronic Archive Initiative

Journal@rchive is an archive site of J-STAGE operated by the Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST). On Journal@rchive, academic journals scanned through the Electronic Archive Initiative are released from their first issues, including those issued in the 19th century. The Initiative commenced by JST in FY2005 aiming at two goals: (1) to preserve of academic heritages of Japan, and (2) to further promote worldwide distribution of Japanese research results.

[About J-STAGE - Introduction]

In order to maintain and develop Japan's science and technology research at an international level, it is important to disseminate outstanding research and development results to the world instantaneously. To that end, it is important to computerize bulletins of academic societies and research papers that are currently appeared on paper by user organizations and release them to the appearance on the Internet.

In order to support the information transmission function of user organizations, the "Japan Science and Technology Information Aggregator, Electronic" (J-STAGE), developed by Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), set up the hardware and software necessary for electronic journal release within JST to provide services 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. By taking advantage of the hardware and software, the user organizations are able to computerize bulletins of academic societies and research papers currently appeared with ease and at low cost. Computerrized documents can be accessed from anywhere in the world with this system. This project also links up with the National Institute of Informatics (formerly the Ministry of Education National Center for Science Information Systems (NACSIS)).

April 26, 2006

Me & Web 2.0

I guess this is an extension of my earlier introduction.

Since I am sure we are all at different levels of technology usage and knowledge, I thought I would post about my technology usage.

I am high on anything that will increase my productivity while supporting mobility. I have two offices on my campus, one in the main library and one in the School of Engineering, and I also drive about 80 miles per day. At work, I rely solely on a laptop. As our campus is totally wireless and I have docking stations in both offices, I can basically work from anywhere that is needed. I will often travel to faculty offices or student study areas to assist or instruction in research, and I can conveniently take my "whole" office with me. I also use a Dell Axim X50v handheld that supports wireless access, email, video, various applications, etc. I can throw it in my pocket and access the library catalog from within the stacks, listen to music while wlaking across campus, or access an urgent email to share with others during a meeting. I love my Axim.

My university supports both a blog system and wiki. I do maintain a work-related weblog (e3 Information Overload, E-resources for Engineering Education) that highlights resources or issues relevant to science and engineering faculty and students. I also add content to other library blogs within my organization, a Reference Weblog and general library news Weblog. The library offers various RSS feeds. I do not participate as much in the wiki, as I have not learned the editing structure yet and it is not straight forward from a user perspective.

I use Pluck to read RSS feeds as it offers the ability to go back and forth from an application on my computer to web-based access as needed. I look forward to seeing how BlogBridge compares. I am also experimenting with Attensa as it work with Microsoft Office.

EECS Professor Awarded $1.2 Million for Bioinformatics Research

Jing Li, an assistant professor with the electrical engineering and computer science department, was recently awarded a National Institutes of Health R01 grant for approximately $1.2 million to be used for interdisciplinary research in bioinformatics and computational biology.

(Source: Case Daily, April, 20, 2006.)

Minority Degrees in Science, Technology, Engineering & Math

Increasing the Success of Minority Students in Science and Technology by the American Council on Education (ACE) on April, 3, 2006

African American and Hispanic students begin college interested in majoring in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) fields at rates similar to those of white and Asian-American students, and persist in these fields through their third year of study, but do not earn their bachelor’s degrees at the same rate as their peers, according to a new analysis conducted by the American Council on Education (ACE).
See full press release for more data.

(Originally shared on the Curious Cat Science & Engineering Blog on April, 21, 2006.)

[About ACE]

Founded in 1918, the American Council on Education (ACE) is the nation's unifying voice for higher education. ACE serves as a consensus leader on key higher education issues and seeks to influence public policy through advocacy, research, and program initiatives. See more at About ACE.

April 25, 2006

Future of Libraries & Web 2.0

My library started a Reading Club for the employees as a way to supplement professional development and leisure activities. We will meet once a month for boxed lunches and sweets. We plan on alternating between novels and professional articles.

For our first meeting, we discussed The Future of Libraries, Beginning the Great Transformation by Thomas Frey (The DaVinci Institute) and What is Web 2.0 by Tim O'Reilly. We only minimally touched on the Web 2.0 article as we ran out of time.

If you are not familiar with the Future of Libraries article, it proposes 10 trends that will drastically change libraries in the next 50 years. It does make some futurist predictions, such that books and literacy will be dead in 50 years. As a group, we thought the timelines were very debatable, and wondering why the author made some of his statements. Frey provided little justification in his predictions, so our discussions went all over the place. Frey's recommendations may be considered reminders for future thinking libraries, as some libraries do many of these things already.

OhioLINK Joins Google's Summer of Code

OhioLINK logo.png Google Logo.gif

From the OhioLINK announcement:

Are you a coder? Then check out Google's Summer of Code, a program designed to inspire young developers and provide students in computer science and related fields the opportunity to do work related to their academic pursuits during the summer, and to support existing open source projects and organizations. OhioLINK is pleased to participate in the Summer of Code program again this year as a mentoring organization.

If your application for the Summer of Code is accepted, you will receive a $4500 award ($500 to get started and $4000 once the project is completed). In addition, the mentoring organization will receive $500 for each student developer that completes a project.

OhioLINK has a page on the Digital Resource Commons development site which describes our participation and projects; take a look, augment or add your own (feel free to read the project documentation through the Wiki link above and suggest other ideas), and apply to participate beginning May 1st. Questions about the program? Take a look at Google's participant FAQ.

April 24, 2006

Take an "Open Book" Quiz to win a Video iPod

knovel logo2.gif

Take the Knovel University Challenge!

Take an "Open Book" Quiz...Knovel Style! You Could Win a 30G Video iPod! Answer all 5 questions on the entry correctly and you could win a 30G Video iPod! (Hint: Use www.knovel.com!)

Only complete entries will be eligible to win. This contest is open to current students in all schools with trials and subscriptions to the Knovel Service. One entry per person. The contest starts today, 4/19/06. You have until (midnight) Wednesday, May 31 to submit your answers and contact information (full name, school, mailing address, email address, and time to complete) via the link at www.info.knovel.com/ipod/.

All entries with a total of 5 correct answers will be placed into a random drawing for the 30G Video iPod, which will take place on June 1, 2006. The Prize will be awarded to one entrant in the US, one entrant in Asia, one entrant in Europe and one entrant in all other regions. All winners must present correct answers to all 5 quiz questions.

The winners will be contacted by Knovel Corporation.


Case does subscribe to Knovel, so use this as a chance to explore what you are missing.

April 21, 2006

Google Search Tips

Here are various Google tips to assist in your research:

RANKING
To put more emphasis on one of the words in your search results, repeat the word in the search.

NUMBER RANGE
Two periods between two numbers is like typing all the numbers into the search box. This would be very helpful when searching for entries in a range of years.

DEFINITIONS
Google will provide a definition by using the search "define:word". For example, "define: nanotechnology" will result in various definitions. Of course, the results must be analyzed by the user to determine accuracy.

CALCULATOR & CONVERTER
The Google search box is a calculator--try typing 2+2. Even better, it's a converter--try 10kg in lbs. It does monetary conversions, too (with a disclaimer).

SYNONYMS
A tilde (~) in front of a word in your search tells Google that you also want to search for synonyms. For example, "tire" brings up 104 million entries, but "~tire" increases the results to 414 million. The results now include words such as "tyre" (the British spelling). Becareful and update your search as needed, because "rubber" was also included which might have nothing to do with your information need.

(Collected from Melissa Belvadi via Wanderings of a Student Librarian, March 23, 2006)

April 20, 2006

Open J-Gate - Another Open Access Database

Open J-Gate is an electronic gateway to global journal literature in open access domain. Launched in 2006, Open J-Gate is the contribution of Informatics (India) Ltd to promote OAI. Open J-Gate provides seamless access to millions of journal articles available online. Open J-Gate is also a database of journal literature, indexed from 3000+ open access journals, with links to full text at Publisher sites.

See About Open J-Gate for more information.

April 18, 2006

BioMed Central Journals Have RSS Feeds

BioMed Central offers RSS feeds for each of their journals.

[What is BioMed Central?]

BioMed Central is an independent publishing house committed to providing immediate open access to peer-reviewed biomedical research. Read more here...

Case Professor Awarded - Anne Hiltner

From the Case Daily (April 14, 2006):

Anne Hiltner, the Herbert Henry Dow Professor of Engineering in macromolecular science and engineering, was recently inducted as a Fellow of the Polymeric Materials Science & Engineering Division of the American Chemical Society.

April 17, 2006

Indian Institute of Astrophysics Repository

Indian Institute of Astrophysics Repository is the digital repository of publications of Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore, India, developed to capture, disseminate and preserve research publications of IIAP. You can search, browse and access full text of these publications from the repository. This Repository also hosts papers published in Bulletin of the Astronomical Society of India.

[Contents of IIAP Repository]

IIAP Repository contains full text of research publications and Ph.d theses of individuals from Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore. In addition, this repository also hosts papers from the journal Bulletin of the Astronomical Society India from Vol. 1, 1973. Presently journal articles, conference papers and preprints can be submitted to this repository and we invite all the researches to send the soft copy of your papers to library@iiap.res.in or chris@iiap.res.in and we will take care of uploading the papers into the repository.

Recently we have included Archival collection as another community in the repository. This Archival collection will include the various archival materials belonging to 18th,19th, & 20th century available in the Institute. These materials are in the form of hand-written manuscripts, photographs, Annual Reports and instruments and their descriptions. The full text of research publications of our directors of Madras Observatory and Kodaikanal Observatory will also be part of this archival collection.

[About Indian Institute of Astrophysics]

The Indian Institute of Astrophysics is a premier national centre devoted to research in astronomy, astrophysics and related physics. It traces its origin back to an observatory set up in 1786 at Madras which from the year 1792 began to formally function at its Nungambakkam premises as the Madras Observatory. With headquarters at Bangalore, the Institute's laboratories are currently active at Kodaikanal,Kavalur, Gauribidanur,Hanle and Hosakote.

New York Times - Science & Technology RSS Feeds

New York Times offers various RSS feeds. You may want to check out the Science RSS or Technology RSS feeds.

Case Professor Added to Editorial Board of Nano Publication

From the Case Daily (April 11, 2006):

Hatsuo Ishida, a professor in the department of macromolecular science and engineering, has been asked to serve as the member of editorial board for the Journal of Nanostructured Polymers and Nanocomposites.

April 15, 2006

American Chemical Society Journals - RSS Feeds

Each of the American Chemical Society journals offer RSS feeds that include their Articles ASAP and complete Table of Contents.

April 14, 2006

The Library of Congress: Webcasts

The Library of Congress has made over 300 webcasts available in a variety of topics. The site includes talks, discussions, and conferences, plus webcasts from the National Book Festival. Subject categories include biography & history, culture & performing arts, education, government, poetry & literature, religion, and science & technology.

Examples of science & technology webcasts include:

  • Got Game
  • Chemical Warfare from WWI to Al-Qaeda
  • Dawn of the Space Age
  • Science, Ethics and the Law
  • Cutting Edge Research

(Originally highlighted by The Scout Report, January 27, 2006 - Volume 12, Number 4)

Patent Search Guides

The Patent Librarian (Michael White) has created two guides to assist in patent searching: U.S. Patent Classification - Classes by Title and U.S. Patent Number Guide.

From Michael White:

Both guides are based on the laminated "quick study" guides sold in college bookstores and shops. The classes by title guide is simply an alphabetical list of current US classes. The group symbols that appear after each title are based on the placement of the class or its subclasses in the "Classes Within the U.S. Patent Classification Arranged by Related Subjects," which is part of the manual of Classification. Cross-reference classes are also noted.

The patent number guide is compiled from many sources including the Manual of Patent Examining Procedure, USPTO web site, WIPO standards, Official Gazette and National Archives publications.

April 13, 2006

FreeMind - Free Mind Mapping Software

SourceForge.net highlighted FreeMind as its February 2006 Project of the Month. FreeMind is mind-mapping software, or a tree editor. With it, you can create foldable trees of plain text notes, enriched with colors, icons, cloud-shapes, and other graphics. Folding and breadth-width search make it valuable as a knowledge base tool.

[About SourceForge.net]

SourceForge.net is the world's largest Open Source software development web site, hosting more than 100,000 projects and over 1,000,000 registered users with a centralized resource for managing projects, issues, communications, and code. SourceForge.net has the largest repository of Open Source code and applications available on the Internet, and hosts more Open Source development products than any other site or network worldwide. SourceForge.net provides a wide variety of services to projects we host, and to the Open Source community. See more here...

Track Biomedical Papers Being Discussed by Bloggers

Postgenomic collates posts from life science blogs and then does useful and interesting things with that data. For example, you can see which papers are currently being discussed by neurologists, or which web pages are being linked to by bioinformaticians. It's sort of like a hot papers meeting with the entire biomed blogging community.

A RSS feed is available to track the "Posts of the day", "Current hot stories", or "Current hot papers".

[About Postgenomic]

Postgenomic aggregates posts from life science blogs and then does useful and interesting things with that data.

For example, it allows you to get an instant picture of which web sites are being heavily linked to by researchers in the medical sciences, or which papers are being cited or reviewed most often by bioinformaticians, or which buzzwords are being used the most frequently by evolutionary biologists.

It's sort of like a hot papers meeting with the entire biomed blogging community.

Sort of.

Postgenomic's primary purpose is to act as a central repository for reviews of scientific papers and for conference reports. You can help with this by adding some very simple semantic markup to your blog posts when you write a review of a paper. In this context a "review" isn't necessarily a particularly long or critical assessment of the paper (though it could be): it's simply any information that other researchers might find useful.

(Originally shared on the Science Library Pad, March 3, 2006)

April 12, 2006

Government Investigation of Internet Search Engines - Poll Results

A recent poll on Government Investigation of Internet Search Engines by the University of Connecticut has some interesting results. The numbers that stood out the most included that 60% oppose companies permanently storing the search behaviors of their users, and 80% reported searching for web sites they would not want others to know about. See the press release for more information.

(Originally shared on SearchEngineWatch, Feb. 23, 2006.)

Virtual Journal for Biomedical Optics

In January of 2006, the Optical Society of America (OSA) launched the Virtual Journal for Biomedical Optics.

[About Virtual Journal for Biomedical Optics]

The Virtual Journal for Biomedical Optics (ISSN: 1931-1532) consists of selected articles recently published in OSA's peer-reviewed journals. For the virtual journal, biomedical optics is considered to include research involving the interface between light and medicine or biology. Articles are selected by the editor, Dr. Gregory W. Faris, on the basis of relevancy using OCIS codes and abstract keywords.

Each issue comprises articles published in the source journals during the previous month. Thus the February virtual journal issue features articles originally published in January. Additional content such as editorials, meeting announcements, tutorials and reviews, and articles from other publications will also be solicited and published as the virtual journal expands its scope over time.

Citations to articles in the Virtual Journal for Biomedical Optics should be made to the original source journals.

[About OSA]

Founded in 1916, the Optical Society of America (OSA) was organized to increase and diffuse the knowledge of optics, pure and applied; to promote the common interests of investigators of optical problems, of designers and of users of optical apparatus of all kinds; and to encourage cooperation among them. The purposes of the Society are scientific, technical and educational. Read more at...

Is Open Source Increasing?

Steve Hardin in The Open Source Movement Gains Ground (Bulletin, February/March 2006, American Society for Information Science and Technology) highlighted the opening plenary session of the 2005 Annual Meeting of the American Society for Information Science & Technology conducted by Matthew J. Szulik, chair, CEO and president of Red Hat.

People who work for Red Hat are doing so because they have the opportunity to see their work improve society. They’ve challenged the notion of “product.” They view software as a service.
(Originally shared on ResourceShelf, March 1, 2006)

April 11, 2006

What Researchers Need to Know about Open Access

Peter Suber in the SPARC Open Access Newsletter (Issue #94, February 2, 2006) shared his Six Things that Researchers Need to Know about Open Access.

  • What OA journals exist in your field?
  • OA journals are not the whole story of OA. There are also OA archives or repositories.
  • OA archiving only takes a few minutes.
  • Most non-OA journals allow authors to deposit their postprints in an OA repository.
  • Journals using the Ingelfinger Rule are a shrinking minority.
  • OA enlarges your audience and citation impact.
Read the full article for more details and examples.

(Originally shared on Quick Picks, March 20, 2006.)

MEMS Technology and Biomedical Applications - Conference

The Gordon Research Conference on "MEMS Technology and Biomedical Applications" will be held at Connecticut College, New London, CT during the week of June 25-30, 2006. There is an opportunity for researchers and their students to present their work at a poster session during the conference. More information about the conference, including links to registration can be found at http://www.grc.uri.edu/programs/2006/mems.htm.

Session topics include:

  • Novel BioMEMS Sensing
  • Chemical Specificity for BioMEMS Sensing
  • BioMaterials for BioMEMS
  • MEMS Technology as a Biomedical Device Platform
  • Biologically Inspired MEMS
  • Biofluidic Microsystems
  • Lab-on-a-Chip
  • Implantable MEMS Devices
  • Applications of BioMEMS in Human Health

Several Case speakers are listed, including:

  • Horst von Recum - "Activation of gene regulation by a drug delivery microchip"
  • Carlos Mastrangelo - Tentative Title: "Microfluidics chips for integrated DNA Assays"

Case Publication - John Lewandowski

On February 01, 2006, the Case Daily shared that John Lewandowski, the Leonard Case, Jr., Professor of Engineering and director of the Mechanical Characterization facility recently had his “Nature Materials’ paper selected and publicized as an Editors Choice paper in Science. In addition, it has been publicized on the Materials Research Society web site.

For the CASE community:
Various print copies of Science are available for your viewing pleasure. Various electronic access points are available as well.

Medical Information Day

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Tuesday, April 11, 2006, or 4-11, is "Medical Information Day". The observance recognizes the invaluable information and vast range of services medical librarians provide for their institutions and local communities.

Case is very lucky with the availability of medical information available to us through the Cleveland Health Sciences Library consisting of the Allen Memorial Medical Library and the Health Center Library.

(Thank you to ResourceShelf, April 9, 2006, for sharing this information.)

April 10, 2006

Investing In Nanotechnology

NanoFocus from Chemical & Engineering News (February 24, 2006) highlighted the increase in funding towards nanotechnology in 2006. Investing In Nanotechnology by Ann M. Thayer shared various measures of R&D investing, such as: