Entries in "Aerospace Engineering" ( for this category only)

Space Oddities: The Slow 'Race' to Get Women into Space

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ALA Midwinter 2008

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I will be heading to Philadelphia for ALA Midwinter in January. I will post my plans and updates here.

Anyone else going?

What can nano do for you?

Come to Science Café Cleveland: a lively, informal scientific discussion in an inviting atmosphere of food and drink.

This month’s topic: What can nano do for you?

Featuring:
Dr. Steven Eppell (CWRU Biomedical Engineering) & Dr. Alexis Abramson (Case Mechanical and Aerospace
Engineering)

WHERE: The brewpub downstairs at Great Lakes Brewing Company (2516 Market Ave, Cleveland)

WHEN: Monday, December 10th; drinks at 6 pm, discussion starts around 6:30 pm

WHO: Sponsored by the CWRU chapter of Sigma Xi, WGBH Boston, and Great Lakes Brewing Company

Science Café Cleveland takes place on the second Monday of each month at GLBC. A few free appetizers are provided, and participants are welcome to purchase additional food and drinks.

Aerospace Industry is Graying & Recruits Virtually

According to the Akron Beacon Journal (Aerospace industry beckons, 5/28/07), 1 out of 4 in the aerospace industry will be eligible for retirement next year. Aerospace companies and recruiters are now using "virtual" tools to recruit, such as Facebook groups and chat rooms. These social tools are being used to educate potential future employers, peak interest in the industry, and maintain content with past interns.

MM&M Celebrates 40 Years of Interdisciplinary Discovery

The Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and the Department of Orthopaedics are hosting a two-day symposium April 3-4 to celebrate 40 years of interdisciplinary research in orthopaedic biomechanics through the Musculoskeletal Mechanics and Materials (MMM) Laboratories. The keynote speaker is Albert Burstein, one of the founders of the laboratory and internationally recognized for his seminal contributions to the understanding of bone biomechanics and total joint replacement design. The symposium will also include lectures by current faculty as well as engineers and clinicians in the field. Register online or call 368-5403.

[VIA: CASE DAILY, March 28, 2007]

Case Professor Authors Award Winning Combustion Paper

Chih-Jen Sung, an associate professor in the mechanical and aerospace engineering department, and his coauthors received the Distinguished Paper Award in Colloquium Laminar Flames from the 31st International Symposium on Combustion.

[VIA: Case Daily - March 02, 2007]

Moon Base in the Future?

According to the National Geographic (December 4, 2006), a moon base has been announced by NASA. I hope Cleveland and institutions like NASA Glenn or Case benefit from these future research and Development opportunities.

CASE's Abramson Joins NorTech Fellows Program

CLEVELAND, Aug. 30 /PRNewswire/ -- NorTech, Northeast Ohio's technology- based economic development leader, announced today that Alexis R. Abramson, Ph.D., an assistant professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at Case Western Reserve University and a nationally-known leader in nanotechnology research, will join the NorTech Fellows Program effective September 1. Read full press release.

Read NorTech's original press release.

Case Doctoral Students Wins AIAA Best Paper Award

Amy Mielke, a doctoral student in the Case Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, was the winner in the Young Professionals category of this year's Northern Ohio American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Best Paper Competition. Her paper, entitled "Rayleigh Scattering Diagnostic for Measurement of Temperature, Velocity, and Density Fluctuation Spectra," was coauthored by Chih-Jen Sung, an associate professor in the department.

(VIA: Case Daily, July 18, 2006)

Virtual Skies Tutorials

The Virtual Skies website was developed by NASA Ames Education Division and is funded in part by Aviation Operations Systems and the Aerospace Education Coordinating Committee (AECC). It is designed for use by high school teachers and their classes, homeschool teachers and students in grades 9 - 12 as well as aviation enthusiasts (pilots and passengers alike). Within this Web site you will be able to explore the world of air traffic management and learn more about NASA research in aviation operations systems and aviation safety.

It offers the following sections:

  • Aviation Weather
  • Aviation Research
  • Airport Design
  • Air Traffic Management
  • Navigation
  • Communications
  • Aeronautics

(VIA: The Scout Report, June 23, 2006)

Tangled Bank #56

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Now for a Tangled Bank hosted by an Engineering Librarian...

General science, biology, and medicine are not my typical subject areas as I usually highlight resources in engineering and electronic resources available from my library. I occasionally branch off into medicine and biology as I support faculty and students conducting research in biomedical engineering.

Good science is important for everyone, and I hope this Tangled Bank promotes further discussion and thoughts, as we explore the science in spacecraft, illness, global warming, butterflies, locust, Star Wars, sex, love, and many other topics.

Outfit a spacecraft with a huge but incredibly lightweight mirror, and it can travel indefinitely, without fuel, at speeds that eventually exceed those of conventional rocket-powered craft. Joe Kissell presents Solar Sails - The next big thing in space travel posted at Interesting Thing of the Day.

Explore some of the research findings that suggest that there is an epigenetic basis to the development of lupus, an autoimmune disease that affects nearly 200 million Americans. Trevor Covert at Epigenetics News shares The Epigenetics of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE).

Jeremy Bruno at The Voltage Gate took a closer look at a recent Oprah show that discussed global warming by looking at a few inaccuracies and the shows reliance on propaganda rather than facts.

GrrlScientist presents Another Origin of Species posted at Living the Scientific Life. This essay describes an elegant Nature paper that investigates the role of homoploid hybridization in creating a new species of butterfly. (Homoploid hybridization is when the parent species and their hybrid offspring all have the same number of chromosomes).

The Different River presents WouldIntroducti

NASA - Prepares for Trip to Moon

NASA's Constellation Program is getting to work on the new spacecraft that will return humans to the moon and blaze a trail to Mars and beyond. Using various Flash animations, Quicktime movies, images, and PDF Fact Sheets learn about this exciting undertaking. View work by assignment, such as the role of Glenn Research Center.

Glenn will manage the work on the CEV's service module, which will provide maneuvering with its propulsion system, generate power using solar arrays, and keep the vehicle cool with heat rejection radiators. Glenn is also the lead for the upper stage of the Crew Launch Vehicle.

(VIA: The Scout Report, June 23, 2006)

NASA Rocket Science 101

Do you want to know more about the Delta II, Atlas V, or Pegasus rockets? Check out Rocket Science 101 produced by NASA. This Flash tutorial explains the parts of a launch vehicle and how its constructed.

(VIA: The Scout Report, June 02, 2006)

Virtual Visit of the Canadian Space Agency

The Canadian Space Agency (CSA) was established in 1989 by the Canadian Space Agency Act. The agency operates like a government department. The president is the equivalent of a deputy minister and reports to the Minister of Industry. The president oversees five core functions: Space Programs, Space Technologies, Space Science, Canadian Astronaut Office, Space Operations. He also looks after six executive functions (Audit, Evaluation and Review; Corporate Management; Communications; Strategic Development; External Relations; Government Liaison) and three Corporate functions (Legal Services, Administration, and Human Resources). The President is supported by the Senior Vice-President and the Vice-President, Science, Technology and Programs.

Take a virtual tour of the John H. Chapman Space Centre. It is really well done and informative. It also makes a nice example if someone were creating a virtual tour of a library or laboratory within their organization.

(Via: The Scout Report, Volume 12, Number 20, May 19, 2006)

Need for Engineers Increasing Due to Aviation Industry

Molly McMillin reports the "demand for engineers is growing in Wichita and across the country as the commercial airline and general aviation industries are in an upswing." See Increase In Work Has Companies Hunting For Engineers (The Wichita Eagle, April 9, 2006) for specific examples.

(Via: Curious Cat Science and Engineering Blog, April 10, 2006)

NSF Supports the Development of Modules to Teach High School Students About Nanotechnology

Alexis Abramson, the Warren E. Rupp Assistant Professor in mechanical and aerospace engineering, received a $20,000 Research Experience for Teachers (RET) supplement from the National Science Foundation to develop modules to teach high school students about nanotechnology. Abramson, along with other collaborators, is developing the Nanopedia, a Web-based multimedia and interactive electric resource on nanotechnology.

(Via: Case Daily, March 24, 2006)

Space Shuttle Program's Future

Looking for more information on the Shuttle Program? Try:
NASA’s Space Shuttle Program: The Columbia Tragedy, the Discovery Mission, and the Future of the Shuttle (in PDF)
Marcia S. Smith - Resources, Science, and Industry Division
Updated January 4, 2006

On August 9, 2005, the space shuttle Discovery successfully completed the first of two “Return to Flight” (RTF) missions — STS-114. It was the first shuttle launch since the February 1, 2003, Columbia tragedy. NASA announced on July 27, 2005, the day after STS-114’s launch, that a second RTF mission would be indefinitely postponed because of a problem that occurred during Discovery’s launch that is similar to what led to the loss of Columbia. The next launch is currently expected some time in 2006. This report discusses the Columbia tragedy, the Discovery mission, and issues for Congress regarding the future of the shuttle.