Entries in "Applied Sciences" ( for this category only)

Major Chemistry Publisher Apparently Phasing Out Print Journals

It appears from an article in Nature (Published online 17 June 2009) that the American Chemical Society has announces steps to phase out their print journals in favor of all electronic access.

I wondered what major publisher would be first to take this action.

CERN's Large Hadron Collider

The Large Hadron Collider is scheduled to go live with its first major experiment on September 10th.

From their website:

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is a gigantic scientific instrument near Geneva, where it spans the border between Switzerland and France about 100 m underground. It is a particle accelerator used by physicists to study the smallest known particles – the fundamental building blocks of all things. It will revolutionise our understanding, from the minuscule world deep within atoms to the vastness of the Universe.

If everything you have read or seen is too technical, you can always fall back on a quick YouTube movie to make everything crystal clear.

C&EN Online

The Case community now has online access to Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN) from 1998 to present. Access was arranged by OhioLINK.

[About C&EN]

Chemical & Engineering News is a weekly magazine published by the American Chemical Society. C&EN editors and reporters based in Europe, the U.S., and Asia cover science and technology, business and industry, government and policy, education, and employment aspects of the chemistry field.

C&EN Online offers Latest News, supplementary material to C&EN print articles, back issues of the magazine since 1998, and special features such as Reel Science, NanoFocus, RSS feeds, and blogs.

Update: ICIS Creates a Students Portal - Includes Chemical Prices

ICIS has fixed the format of the chemical price list that is contained within their student portal. It formally did not view correctly in the Firefox browser, but it should work for all major browsers now.

MM&M Celebrates 40 Years of Interdisciplinary Discovery

The Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and the Department of Orthopaedics are hosting a two-day symposium April 3-4 to celebrate 40 years of interdisciplinary research in orthopaedic biomechanics through the Musculoskeletal Mechanics and Materials (MMM) Laboratories. The keynote speaker is Albert Burstein, one of the founders of the laboratory and internationally recognized for his seminal contributions to the understanding of bone biomechanics and total joint replacement design. The symposium will also include lectures by current faculty as well as engineers and clinicians in the field. Register online or call 368-5403.

[VIA: CASE DAILY, March 28, 2007]

Medical Dictionary

MedicineNet.com has published an online medical dictionary that contains over 16,000 medical terms.

From About Us:

MedicineNet, Inc. is owned and operated by WebMD and part of the WebMD Network.

MedicineNet.com is an online, healthcare media publishing company. It provides easy-to-read, in-depth, authoritative medical information for consumers via its robust, user-friendly, interactive web site.

[VIA: The Scout Report -- Volume 13, Number 7]

The Mathematics Genealogy Project

As reported in the PAM Bulletin (Vol. 34, No. 3) and on PAMNET, the Mathematics Genealogy Project now integrates papers in MathSciNet to individual mathematicians with the potential to include links from MathSciNet to the Mathematics Genealogy Project. Check it out at http://genealogy.math.ndsu.nodak.edu/.

New Lie Group

What do you get when you mix 18 mathematicians, 4 years of research, and 77 hours of supercomputer computation - mapping of the Lie group E8.

It describes the symmetries of a 57-dimensional object that can in essence be rotated in 248 ways without changing its appearance.
[VIA: 025.431: The Dewey blog: Fearful symmetry]

ICIS Creates Student Portal

ICIS is working on a new student portal, or "knowledge zone". Right now it links to some resources available to students. In the future, they "hope it will turn into a space in which students and academics worldwide can communicate and discuss issues with each other, and showcase their best work to the wider world, not least potential employers."

Several librarians have contacted and discussed the lack of chemical prices for student projects with ICIS. In the past, I documented and shared my concerns directly with ICIS. Randy Reichardt has taken similar steps. He has personally been involved in the recent developments.

ICIS with the announcement of this new student portal has helped to fill this need for chemical prices. ICIS now provides "you with historical chemical prices. Note that these prices are a guide only, and must not be used to guide real-time business."

I understand chemical prices are hard to locate and maintain, even for a major chemical publisher, so this historical resource fills a major need for chemical engineering students.

Thank you ICIS and Randy Reichardt!

Continue reading "ICIS Creates Student Portal"

CSA Trust - Winter Newsletter

The Chemical Structure Association (CSA) Trust has published its winter Newsletter, which is freely available to all at http://csa-trust.org.

The Chemical Structure Association Trust (CSA Trust) is an internationally recognized, registered charity which promotes education, research and development in the field of storage, processing and retrieval of information about chemical structures, reactions and compounds. Many students and researchers world-wide, who work in this area, have benefited from the Trust Awards and Grants programmes to further their research work.

UK PubMed Central Launched

The British Library Press Release
UK PubMed Central Launched
9 January, 2007

From today scientists will be able to access a vast collection of biomedical research and to submit their own published results for inclusion in a new online resource. Based on a model currently used by the US National Institute of Health, UK PubMed Central (UKPMC) will provide free access to a permanent online archive of peer-reviewed research papers in the medical and life sciences. See: www.ukpmc.ac.uk.

See also PubMed Central (PMC), the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) free digital archive of biomedical and life sciences journal literature.

Lets go Case Students - Win the Knovel University Challenge

Knovelunivbanner.gif
Knovel University Challenge kicks off its spring 2007 season on February 5th and will run through April 5th. The University Challenge provides students the opportunity to master their research and analysis skills while competing for 9 prizes. This year's winners will receive a $1500 scholarship or 1 of 8 iPod Shuffles. The University Challenge, now in its third season, is open to students of hard sciences, mathematics and technology-related courses of study at universities with access to Knovel Library or Knovel K-Essentials.

To participate in the Spring University Challenge, go to http://www.info.knovel.com/challenge/.

Ohio Note:
In Fall of 2006, a University of Cincinnati student won a 30G Video iPod.

Midwest Biomedical Engineering Conference

The Case School of Engineering is hosting the Midwest Biomedical Engineering Conference on February 23. Online registration, abstract submission, and resume submission are now open. All abstracts and resumes must be submitted by February 9. For more information, go to http://www.mbecconference.org/.

From website:

MBEC 2007: "Showcasing the future of biomedical engineering"

The Midwest Biomedical Engineering Conference (MBEC) 2007 is designed to bring together students & practitioners of Biomedical Engineering and the Life Sciences for panel discussions, technical sessions, and informal extended exchange of ideas important to the future of Biomedical Engineering in the Midwest. Some conference highlights include:

  • Assisting participants in planning their academic and industrial careers
  • Introducing companies to the wealth of intellectual prowess rooted in the Midwest
  • Exposing participants to innovative research in biomedical engineering and allied areas
MBEC 2007 is hosted by Case Western Reserve University. All universities are welcome to attend.
[VIA: Case Daily - February 02, 2007]

Continue reading "Midwest Biomedical Engineering Conference"

In Memoriam - Paul Claspy

This is not my traditional postings, but it has great connection to the Kelvin Smith Library, physics, and electrical engineering here at Case. William Claspy works in KSL as the librarian for astronomy, chemistry, and library instruction.

From Case Daily - January 26, 2007:
Paul Claspy, alumnus and associate professor emeritus of electrical engineering and applied physics at Case Western Reserve University, died of complications from multiple myeloma on January 19 at the Renaissance Retirement Center in Olmsted Township. Prof. Claspy, who earned a Ph.D. (1970) in electrical engineering and applied physics from the School of Graduate Studies, was hired as a faculty member in 1973, retiring July 1, 1993. He received emeritus status in 1997. In addition to teaching, he was education director for Ohio Aerospace Institute. He married the former Lois Hoffman, who earned her master's in library science in 1958 from the former Western Reserve University School of Information and Library Science. She died in December, 2006. Survivors include daughters Jane Nesmith of Cedar Rapids, Iowa; Ellen Vesey of Atlanta, Ga.; and son William Claspy (CWR '88, GRS '93, English) of Middleburg Heights, Ohio. To read more about Prof. Claspy, refer to Cleveland Plain Dealer article on January 23, 2007.

Online Encyclopedia of Medical Images

Effective January 1st, the entire OhioLINK community has access to Images.MD.

Images.MD, the online encyclopedia of medical images, compiles more than 55,000 images from more than 90 collections ranging from allergy to urology, each accompanied by detailed and informative text contributed by more than 2,000 medical experts.

Members of OhioLink have free access to full-sized, high quality images in step with the latest developments in medicine. By filling out a simple registration form, you can also start your own image library, create PowerPoint® presentations of images in your library, and order customized CD-ROMs of your favorite slides.

National Center for Case Study Teaching in Science

The University of Buffalo's National Center for Case Study Teaching in Science exists to promote and distribute materials to support using case studies in science education. It is supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF).

The website contains links to:

  • Science education journals provided by category, such as mathematics or engineering
  • Related websites
  • Case ideas
  • Directory of instructors
  • Assessment materials
  • Case study collection
  • Instructional materials
  • Conference highlights

In addition, one of the co-directors is the Associate Librarian of the Science and Engineering Library of the University of Buffalo.

[VIA: The Scout Report -- Volume 12, Number 28]

General Chemistry Online

Dr. Fred Senese of the Deparment of Chemistry at Frostburg State University has created an online guide to everything about general chemistry. General Chemistry Online includes:

  • Common compound library
  • Notes and guides for first semester general chemistry
  • Flash-based modeling kits
  • Articles
  • Tutorials
  • Simulations
  • Quizzes
  • Survival guide
  • FAQs

[VIA: The Scout Report -- Volume 12, Number 31]

Case BME Professor Wins World Technology Award

P. Hunter Peckham, professor of biomedical engineering, recently received the 2006 World Technology Award for Health and Medicine. His research focuses on functional restoration of paralyzed arms in individuals with spinal cord injury.

The World Technology Network (WTN) is a global meeting ground, a virtual think tank, and an elite club whose members are all focused on the business and science of bringing important emerging technologies of all types (from biotech to new materials, from IT to new energy sources) into reality. The WTN's membership is comprised of approximately 1000 members from more than 60 countries, judged by their peers to be the most innovative in the technology world.

[VIA: Case Daily, December 1, 2006]

SOURCE Funds Case Students to Present Research

Several undergraduate students recently received SOURCE (Support of Undergraduate Research and Creative Endeavors) travel funding to present their research at national conferences, including:

[VIA: Case Daily, November 9, 2006]

Case Math Student Wins Travel Award

Rachel Hageman, a math graduate student, has received one of 10 national Association for Women in Mathematics (AWM) travel awards to present her research at the national meeting of the American Mathematical Society in January 2007, in New Orleans. Professor Daniela Calvetti is her academic adviser.

[VIA: Case Daily, October 19, 2006]

Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) Website Downtime

The Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) website (http://www.rsc.org) will be unavailable on Saturday 2 December 2006 from 09.00 to 17.00 GMT for essential maintenance.

The RSC apologises for any inconvenience that this downtime may cause.

Customer Services
Royal Society of Chemistry, Cambridge, UK

Topology - Entire Editorial Board Resigns

Several sources, such as the ACRLog, have announced that all the members of the editorial board of the mathematics journal Topology have resigned due to the pricing policy of its publisher Elsevier.

We have heard other reports like this over the last few years, and may see more actions like this in the future as journal prices climb quicker than the money available for their purchase.

Case has access to Topology through the OhioLINK Electronic Journal Center.

Fourth Joint Sheffield Conference on Chemoinformatics: Call for Papers

The Chemical Structure Association Trust and the Molecular Graphics and Modelling Society announce their Fourth Joint Sheffield Conference on Chemoinformatics. The conference will be held in The Octagon Centre and the Stephenson and Tapton Halls of Residence, University of Sheffield, UK, from 18th-20th June 2007.

Offers of papers are welcomed in all aspects of chemoinformatics.
Possible topics include (but are not limited to):

  • High-Throughput Screening, including: assay quality control; design of screening collections; systems based design
  • Virtual Screening including, including: docking and pharmacophore analysis, similarity and clustering methods; machine learning
  • Computational Methods for Lead Identification and Optimisation including: modelling and structure-activity methods; structure-based design; ADMET prediction
  • New Algorithms and Technologies including: data mining; searching methods; distributed processing; data handling and visualisation;
  • Case Histories, incorporating practical experience of any of the above
The programme will have space for ca. two dozen oral presentations, and there will also be extensive opportunities for poster presentations. Authors wishing to submit a paper should send a title and abstract (minimum 500 words) by 31st January 2007 to cheminf2007@sheffield.ac.uk, stating whether they wish to be considered for an oral or for a poster presentation.

Submissions will be selected as either oral contributions or posters by the Organising Committee, with notification of acceptance by 28th February 2007. In selecting papers for oral presentation, the Committee will seek to achieve a balance between the various areas of the subject and between new methodologies and successful applications of existing techniques.

Further details of the conference, including registration information and opportunities for sponsorship and participation in the conference exhibition will follow later in the year, and will be posted at the conference website.

[VIA: CHMINF-L listserv]

S.O.S. Mathematics - Free Math Review Material

S.O.S. MATHematics is your free resource for math review material from Algebra to Differential Equations.

The perfect study site for high school, college students and adult learners. Get help to do your homework, refresh your memory, prepare for a test...

Browse our more than 2,500 Math pages filled with short and easy-to-understand explanations. Click on one of the following subject areas: Algebra, Trigonometry, Calculus, Differential Equations, Complex Variables, Matrix Algebra, or Mathematical Tables.

[VIA: The Scout Report -- Volume 12, Number 26]

New Purchase - Encyclopedia of Biostatistics Online

The Encyclopedia of Biostatistics (2nd Ed.) offers the definitive reference to support the development and use of statistical methods for addressing the problems and critical issues that confront scientists, practitioners and policy makers engaged in the life and medical sciences. With the growing importance and application of biostatistics, reflected in the increasing number of statisticians employed in the pharmaceutical industry, healthcare sector and medical schools, this new edition will find widespread application in basic medical science; the planning, financing and distribution of health care; and the measurement of health care status and progress in the population.

The Encyclopedia now includes many contributions that focus on the rapid growth of bioinformatics and its pivotal role in studying the human genome.

  • Expanded and enhanced coverage of key topics including bioinformatics, clinical trials, computation, genetics, and Bayesian methods and applications
  • Containing over 1300 articles, 182 entirely new to this edition, with more than 300 revised and updated to reflect current research and developments
  • All encompassed in 8 extensively cross-referenced volumes
The Case community has access to the Encyclopedia of Biostatistics through the Research Database list. Eventually it will also appear in the library catalog.

Case Mathematics Professor Speaks in Spain

Stanislaw Szarek, professor of mathematics at Case, was a recent invited lecturer at the International Congress of Mathematics in Madrid, Spain.

[VIA: CASE DAILY, October 17, 2006]

RIBMS: Research at the Interface of the Biological and Mathematical Sciences

A new initiative funded by the National Science Foundation will pave the way for undergraduates to get involved in the growing field of mathematical sciences becoming an indispensable part of breakthroughs in the biological sciences. Case's Research at the Interface of the Biological and Mathematical Sciences will provide opportunities for math, statistics and biology majors to collaborate across disciplinary boundaries, mentored by interdisciplinary teams of faculty. Further information is available at http://www.case.edu/artsci/ribms/ribms.html. Application deadline is November 8.

[VIA: CASE DAILY, October 30, 2006]

Fields Medals Awarded

Fields Medals awarded on August 22, 2006:

  • Andrei Okounkov (Princeton) - "For his contributions bridging probability, representation theory and algebraic geometry."
  • Grigori Perelman (recent Poincare conjecture fame) - "For his contributions to geometry and his revolutionary insights into the analytical and geometric structure of the Ricci flow."
  • Terence Tao (UCLA) - "For his contributions to partial differential equations, combinatorics, harmonic analysis and additive number theory."
  • Wendelin Werner (University of Paris - Sudin Orsay) - "For his contributions to the development of stochastic Loewne revolution, the geometry of two-dimensional Brownian motion, and conformal field theory."

The Fields Medals are the most important international prize in the world of mathematics. They are awarded by the International Mathematical Union (IMU) every four years at the ICM (International Congress of Mathematics).

Continue reading "Fields Medals Awarded"

Wiki of Mathcasts

Mathcasts.org was created to give students a library of math tutorials and problem solutions and to give teachers a place to share their methods for teaching & learn from others. It's also a place where students & teachers can contribute and organize sets of movies for others or themselves to use.

Mathcasts are screencasts (screen movies of writing with voice) that focus on mathematics. The collection is maintained in a wiki powered by MediaWiki.

[VIA: The Scout Report, Volume 12, Number 37]

Continue reading "Wiki of Mathcasts"

Rediscovering Archimedes Writings

Stanford University researchers are using X-ray to reveal the 10th century mathematic writings of Archimedes that were erased and hidden by a Christian monk's prayers. See the full story for details how.

[VIA: Wired News, August 5, 2006]

Continue reading "Rediscovering Archimedes Writings"

New Case Publication: Staggered Passive Micromixers with Fractal Surface Patterning

Staggered Passive Micromixers with Fractal Surface Patterning
Marco Camesasca, Miron Kaufman, and Ica Manas-Zloczower
Department of Macromolecular Science, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106
Physics Department, Cleveland State University, Cleveland, Ohio 44115

Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering
Vol: 16, Issue: 11, November 2006, pp. 2298-2311

Abstract

We present a procedure for inducing chaotic mixing based on a non-periodic patterning of the walls making use of the Weierstrass fractal function to generate the locations for the grooves. We show the numerical analysis of flow in three different geometries generated with the Weierstrass function and compare the results with a fourth geometry, quite similar to the staggered herringbone mixer (SHM) of Stroock et al (2002 Science 295 647), for which the patterning is periodic. We evaluate the Lyapunov exponents for massless and non-interacting particles advected by the flow and traced along the channels. We also compute the entropy of mixing for binary mixtures. Finally, we compute generalized (fractal) dimensions associated with the interface of the two fluids. The results show consistently substantial enhancement in mixing efficiency for two of the Weierstrass channels compared to the SHM.
Availability for Case Faculty, Staff, & Students:

CALL FOR PAPERS - Advanced Mining & Use of Life Science Information

CALL FOR PAPERS - Advanced mining and use of life science information, ACS Chicago, March 2007

You are invited to submit abstracts for a session entitled "Advanced mining and use of life science information" in the division of Chemical Information (CINF), co-sponsored with the CSA Trust, at the 233rd American Chemical Society meeting in Chicago, March 25-29, 2007

We are particularly interested in papers that address the mining of large volumes and diverse sources of chemical and life science information to aid in decision making in the drug discovery process. Potential topics include (but are not limited to):

  • Development or application of data mining techniques
  • Knowledge discovery on large chemical databases such as PubChem
  • Integrating textual and structural information
  • Design of interfaces and interaction tools for complex, diverse kinds of information
  • Database querying tools and interfaces
The presentation should last about 30 minutes, including time for questions. To submit an abstract, go to http://oasys.acs.org/acs/233nm/cinf/papers/index.cgi and select the "Advanced mining and use of life science information" session. Abstracts should be submitted no later than November 17th, 2006.

If you have questions, please feel free to contact David Wild at djwild @ indiana.edu. You can find out more information about the CSA Trust at http://www.csa-trust.org/.

David Wild
Session organizer

___________________________________________

Dr. David J. Wild, djwild @ indiana.edu
Assistant Professor

Indiana University School of Informatics

ph (812) 856-1848 - fax (812) 856-1995

1900 E. 10th St. Rm. 1128, Bloomington, IN 47406

web http://www.informatics.indiana.edu/djwild

Chemistry Central Journal - New Open Access, Peer-Reviewed, Online Journal

Chemistry Central Journal (ISSN 1752-153X) is an open access, peer-reviewed, online journal recently launched by Chemistry Central. Chemistry Central, developed by the same team who created BioMed Central, the leading biomedical open access publisher, is committed to ensuring peer-reviewed chemical research is immediately and permanently available online without charge or any other barriers to access.

Chemistry Central Journal encompasses all aspects of research in chemistry, broken down into discipline-specific sections.


Chemistry Central is a new service publishing peer-reviewed open access research in chemistry from BioMed Central, the leading biomedical open access publisher. The Chemistry Central website currently features chemistry-related articles published in BioMed Central journals and independent journals utilizing BioMed Central's open access publishing services. Chemistry Central is planning to launch further chemistry-specific journals in the near future.

ICIS Chemical Business Americas - Update

I am glad to see Randy Reichardt at the University of Alberta got a little further with a response towards why the publication (Chemical Market Reporter) was drastically changed with no feedback or warning to academia. I only received a standard response from several people at ICIS that basically already told me the obvious - "we are only covering about 100 prices and focusing more on news". I made it clear to ICIS that the strength, and what made them unique to academic libraries, was that they covered such a large amount of chemical prices. The current price coverage was much weaker than they were promoting and probably of minimal value for engineering students. Chemical industry news had many publications and organizations that focused in this realm and they were leaving a niche market (chemical prices) that academia relied heavily on CMR for.

Randy Reichardt received another response from Penny Wilson, ICIS Global Editorial Director, that reaffirmed a commitment to students. I hope this statement is not just an attempt to keep current subscribers. Their past efforts have not shown that students were considered much in their decisions, or they did not truely understand their subscibers or future subscriber needs. I am hoping it is the later, and they just did not understand how much academia needed chemical prices before they dropped the prices from the print CMR, rigged together a clunky online access with no IP recognition, and finally slashed hundreds of prices from their inventory.

Case in the Top 100 in Biotechnology Research

A study released Wednesday by the Milken Institute, a nonprofit, independent economic think tank in Santa Monica, Calif., places Case in the top 100 of U.S. universities in biotechnology research and turning that research into commercial applications. As for Ohio universities specifically, Ohio State University ranked the highest, at 50th, followed by University of Cincinnati, 60th; University of Akron, 65th; and Case, 68th.

[VIA: Case Daily, September 21, 2006]

ICIS Chemical Business Americas - More News

Seems like ICIS Chemical Business Americas (Chemical Market Reporter) may be writing its own ending in academic libraries. Randy Reichardt has discovered that up to 75-80% of the prices that were historically tracked have been removed from the online price index.

I looked today (September 12, 2006) at the price index. Only 86 prices were listed for 51 unique compounds. Last year when we spent the EXTRA money over 500 entries were included. In addition, many of the items that are included rarely come up in a chemical engineering design project at my institution. For example, I have never helped a student look up the following items nor did I need them a couple of years ago when I worked on my own chemical engineering design projects: coconut oil (2 entries), clover leaf oil, cotton oil (2 entries), canola meal, fish oil (4 entries), etc.

I will be updating my chemical engineering research guide to include other alternative resources and tricks for students to find chemical prices, as the value of this resource may no longer be a luxury academic libraries can afford.


Timeline of events:

CMR Now Called ICIS Chemical Business Americas

UPDATE to my earlier posting and formal annoucement from publisher:

CMR is now ICIS Chemical Business Americas. As of the 4th September CMR has been reborn as ICIS Chemical Business Americas. As part of ICIS, we aim to leverage our strengths and reflect this in our branding. With our global and extensive resources from around the world we can present our readers with the most comprehensive publication in the sector.

ICIS Chemical Business Americas will continue to provide our readers with all the content that they have grown to rely upon at CMR, from news of the week to expert coverage of key markets. And we are sure our readers we love our new fresh design and our regular new sections.

The Case Community can continue to gain access from the Library Catalog under "Chemical Market Reporter", until the name and links have all been changed.

Chemical Market Reporter Publisher Again Shows No Respect for Academia

As you may recall previously, I worked with the publisher of Chemical Market Reporter to establish electronic access for the Case community. This came after many librarians expressed great concern to the publisher for not considering the needs of their users.

CMR was one of the few resources available for students to establish chemical prices for their many projects. The publisher switched to online-only without asking academic users what they needed the most. They tried to make things better by offering an online subscription, but many libraries were still left in the dark as they required a single password login and wanted more money. This publisher forgot that the future purchasers of CMR would be the very students they were ignoring now.

ICIS has again decided to ignore academic subscribers. They are changing CMR to another publication, but shut down operations right when many academic librarians were directing students to this resource. A "coming soon" message does not help students complete their assignments.

Nanopolymers 2007 - First International Conference

Nanopolymers 2007 - First International Conference
12th–13th June 2007, Germany

Rapra Technology is pleased to announce the first international Nanopolymers Conference, to be held in Germany, from 12th–13th June 2007. Nanotechnology is already making a major impact on new product introductions throughout the world, in many industry sectors. Many of these new products are based on the material property changes that may be achieved by incorporation of ingredients, at the nanoscale, into polymeric systems.

Although nanoparticulate carbon black has been used in car tyres for decades, it is only recently that other nanoparticulate ingredients have been dispersed in plastics to provide exciting new materials that are lighter weight and as strong as metals. The automotive industry has championed the use of nanocomposites, exploiting other properties, such as smoother surfaces, easier processing and even cheaper materials, which can be gained as well as providing lighter weight products. In addition, nanoscale ingredients are being added to polymeric thin films, thereby providing properties such as anti-scratch, anti-microbial and anti-reflective surfaces. It is also possible to obtain special visual effects through nano-coatings. The textiles industry and the sporting goods industry are also introducing nanotechnology based products, and it is estimated that there are now over 700 nano-based products on the market.

The main ‘nano’ ingredients being dispersed in polymeric systems are especially organoclays, nanoparticulate inorganics, and carbon nanotubes.

This conference provides an opportunity and a platform to present your research, product or process developments in this area to an influential and informed audience.

Presenting authors at Nanopolymers 2007 will be entitled to free registration on both days of the conference including meals, refreshments and a copy of the proceedings.

Papers are now being invited for submission on any of the following areas:

  • Aspects and impact of nanopolymers on specific industry sectors (automotive, aerospace, marine, energy, healthcare, packaging, leisure, etc.)
  • Production challenges to incorporation and use of nanoclays, nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, or fullerenes in composites and thin film coatings
  • Property improvements achievable with nano-scale ingredients such as lighter weight, improved barrier properties, scratch resistance, anti-microbial, anti-reflective, conducting properties
  • Characterisation aspects of incorporating nano-scale ingredients into nanopolymers
  • Market data on growth of nanopolymers
  • New research and development in the field of nanopolymers
If you are interested in presenting a paper at this event, please send a title, short summary, speaker name(s) and company name(s) to Alix Yates email ayates@rapra.net or Fax +44(0)1939-252416 by the deadline of 22nd December 2006.

Register before 12 April 2007 to take advantage of the special Early Bird Discount registration fee.

Materials, Medicine, and Nanotechnology Summit in Cleveland

Innovators in medical devices, clinical practice, and biomedical research will gather at Cleveland Clinic Oct. 2-5 to discuss the latest materials advances and nanotechnology discoveries and how they are resulting in new medical applications.

The Materials, Medicine, and Nanotechnology Summit will be hosted by Cleveland Clinic, ASM International, and the Nano-Network as the anchor event of Nano-Week™ 2006, a five-day exploration of how nanotechnology is changing our world. The Summit is comprised of the biennial Cleveland Clinic NanoMedicine Summit and ASM's Materials & Processes for Medical Devices (MPMD) Conference and Exposition.

Advance registration closes September 24.

More Open Access Books from Caltech

Caltech has offered more open access books since my initial post. Thanks to Dana Roth (Caltech, Chemistry Librarian) for the update.

Caltech has started a depository of open access books by Caltech authors. Subjects include chemistry, economics, geological & planetary sciences, mathematics, and mechanical engineering. The books range from 1959 to 2005.

New chemistry books include:

  • Carl J. Ballhausen and Harry B. Gray, Molecular orbital theory: an introductory lecture note and reprint volume, 1965
  • Roberts, John D. and Stewart, Ross and Caserio, Marjorie C., Organic chemistry: methane to macromolecules, 1971

Grant Money Reinstated for Evolutionary Biology

WASHINGTON, Aug. 31 (UPI) -- The U.S. Department of Education has reinstated evolutionary biology to a federal grant list for undergraduate studies.

"There are well-funded efforts in this country that have been inappropriately attempting to attack the teaching of evolutionary biology on what appear to be religious grounds," physicist Lawrence Krauss of Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland wrote to the Department of Education.
[VIA: Case Daily - September 01, 2006]

Algebra by Video-On-Demand

Annenberg Media has posted all 26 half-hour video-on-demand programs from its Algebra: In Simplest Terms series. The sessions are free after registering on the website, and are designed for high school and college users.

In this series, host Sol Garfunkel explains how algebra is used for solving real-world problems and clearly explains concepts that may baffle many students. Graphic illustrations and on-location examples help students connect mathematics to daily life. The series also has applications in geometry and calculus instruction. Algebra is also valuable for teachers seeking to review the subject matter.

[About Annenberg Media]

Annenberg Media uses media and telecommunications to advance excellent teaching in American schools. This mandate is carried out chiefly by the funding and broad distribution of educational video programs with coordinated Web and print materials for the professional development of K-12 teachers. It is part of The Annenberg Foundation and advances the Foundation's goal of encouraging the development of more effective ways to share ideas and knowledge.

(VIA: The Scout Report, July 21, 2006, Volume 12, Number 29)

ICIS Jobs - Coming Soon

UPDATE:
ICIS jobs is now available.


ICIS jobs will be available soon, with searchable chemicals jobs and careers information.

ICIS is an information provider for the chemical and oil industry.

Chemistry World News by RSS Feed

Chemistry World's daily news service is now available as a RSS feed, joining the existing feeds for RSC Journals.

Chemistry World is packed with articles on all aspects of the chemical sciences, regular company and individual profiles, job vacancies, commercial technology reports and many fascinating features.

(VIA: SD Librarian, July 28, 2006)

Nanomedicine Lab Registry & Portal

The Nanomedicine Lab Registry was compiled from Medline abstracts containing specific nanomedicine keyphrases. It only includes laboratories with 5 or more publications. It uses a database of citation histories compiled from open source journal article reference lists and a major OCR (optical character recognition) campaign on their entire reference library. Labs are ranked according to the citation rate of each individual article. For articles where they do not have sufficient data or were too new to have citation data, they used historical citation data from the journal and the principal investigator. The registry currently ranks the top 382 laboratories, with Chad Mirkin's lab garnering the highest score. Pat Couvreur, Royce Murray, Dave Reinhoudt and Ralph Weissleder rounded out the top 5. Their intention with the registry is to help new graduate students and postdocs to find high impact laboratories. This information is probably interesting to the general public as well if they are interested in the most productive labs.

Related is the Nanomedicine and Nanobiology Research portal that includes recent high impact publications, recent nanomedicine jobs, recent nanomedicine news, top ranked nanomedicine scientists, nanomedicine links, featured nanomedicine books, and nanomedicine conferences.

The Lab Registry is maintained by Ion Channel Media Group, and it operates a number of life science portals. It is founded by J. Christian Hesketh, who is trained in classical biophysics in Canada.

Biomedical Image Award Gallery

The Biomedical Image Awards 2006 is a striking display of shapes and patterns, and illustrates the microscopic structures of living organisms in a spectacular variety of ways.

Selected by a team of expert judges from recent acquisitions by the Medical Photographic Library of the Wellcome Library, the winning images show a wide variety of subjects, most invisible to the naked eye, revealing new layers of complexity.

My favorite might be the cross-section of an old specimen of rhinoceros horn.

Fuel Cells and the Hydrogen Economy

From ScienceBase:

Hydrogen fuel cells have been relatively neglected through insufficient support from industry and government, according to a study published today funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC).
Read the full commentary at ScienceBase looking at fuel cells as disruptive technology or browse the documents related to the research at ESRC.
Award Name: The Development and Diffusion of Fuel Cell Technology as a Disruptive Innovation
Award Holder: Prof Chris Hendry
Programme Name: Sustainable Technologies
Co-applicant(s): Dr P Harborne, Prof C Arcoumanis

Google & ACS Trademark Case

According to CNET News.com, the Google Scholar trademark case ends with the American Chemical Society.

ACS, which was founded in 1876 and claims to be the world's largest scientific society, sued Google in 2004. The suit claimed that the free "Google Scholar" journal-search service unfairly competes with ACS' "SciFinder Scholar," which appears to be more comprehensive but charges a fee.

50 Top Science Blogs

Nature.com explored the top 5 science blogs, according to Technorati ranking, and asked the writers about their success.

Related items:

(VIA: The Curious Cat Science & Engineering Blog, July 6, 2006)

Open Access Books from Caltech

Caltech has started a depository of open access books by Caltech authors. Subjects include chemistry, economics, geological & planetary sciences, mathematics, and mechanical engineering. The books range from 1959 to 2005.

As of July 23, 2006, some of the books included:

Mathematics:
Abraham, Ralph and Marsden, Jerrold E. (1987) Foundations of Mechanics, Second Edition. Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, Inc., Redwood City, CA. ISBN 080530102X

Mechanical Engineering:
Brennen, Christopher Earls (2005) Fundamentals of Multiphase Flow. Cambridge University Press. ISBN 13 978-0-521-84804-6

Brennen, Christopher Earls (1995) Cavitation and Bubble Dynamics. Oxford University Press, New York. ISBN 0195094093

Brennen, Christopher Earls (1994) Hydrodynamics of Pumps. Concepts NREC and Oxford University Press.

Housner, George W. and Hudson, Donald E. (1980) Applied Mechanics Dynamics. California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA.

Housner, George W. and Vreeland, Thad, Jr. (1965) The Analysis of Stress and Deformation. California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA.

Chemistry:
Goddard, William A., III (1986) Nature of the Chemical Bond. California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA.

Langford, Cooper H. and Gray, Harry B. (1966) Ligand Substitution Processes. W. A. Benjamin, Inc., New York.

Roberts, John D. (1961) Notes on Molecular Orbital Calculations. W. A. Benjamin.

Roberts, John D. (1961) An Introduction to the Analysis of Spin-Spin Splitting in High-Resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectra. W. A. Benjamin.

Roberts, John D. (1959) Nuclear Magnetic Resonance: applications to organic chemistry. McGraw-Hill Series in Advanced Chemistry. McGraw-Hill Book Company, Inc.

(VIA: Science Resources, May, 8, 2006)

Nationwide Chemical Security Plan

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) on June 30 released the National Infrastructure Protection Plan (NIPP), which includes the first nationwide plan to protect U.S. chemical plants and related infrastructures.

According to Chemical & Engineering News (July 3, 2006), sector-specific security plans that complement NIPP and detail the risk management framework will be released within six months.

Chemistry Magazine

Chemistry is a tabloid published for American Chemical Society Members, Student Affiliates, and those interested in learning more about the chemical sciences and the American Chemical Society.

Snapshot Of The Chemical Industry

Chemical & Engineering News (July 10, 2006) provided a snapshot of employment, finanaces, production, and trade in Facts & Figures Of The Chemical Industry.

(VIA: Quick Picks, July 11, 2006)

Big Money for "Little" Research

C.C. Liu, a chemical engineering professor at Case Western Reserve University, will lead a team studying novel microscopic machines powered by ultra light-sensitive molecules as part of a four-year, $1.3 million grant from the National Science Foundation.

See full article from Crain's Cleveland Business on the web (July 19, 2006).

(VIA: Case Daily, July 20, 2006)

FREE ONLINE - Building a National Science Digital Library

UPDATE: If you did not participate in the live presentation, the PowerPoint and related materials are available.


EDUCAUSE Live! May 8, 2006 1:00 p.m. EDT (12:00 p.m. CDT, 11:00 a.m. MDT, 10:00 a.m. PDT); runs one hour

Your host, Steve Worona, will be joined by Dean Krafft, and the topic will be "Building a National Science Digital Library."

Since 2000, the National Science Digital Library (NSDL) Core Integration team has been creating the infrastructure for a digital library of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics resources. That library now contains more than a million resources from approximately 100 collections. In this talk, Dean Krafft will give a short historical overview of the NSDL and describe the current NSDL community and participants. He will then review the technical underpinnings of NSDL 1.0, a library built on metadata harvesting, and describe some of the challenges encountered. For the past year, the project has been working on NSDL 2.0, a new version of the library built on the Fedora repository architecture. For the last part of the talk, Krafft will describe this new library architecture and explain how it supports creating context for science resources, how it enhances the selection and use of library materials, and what these capabilities mean for the users of the NSDL.

Dean Krafft is currently a senior research associate in computer science at Cornell University, serving primarily as a researcher but also as an IT administrator. On the research side, he is the principal investigator for the National Science Digital Library (NSDL) Project (http://nsdl.org/) at Cornell. Krafft leads the effort to develop key components of the Core Integration Technology for the library and manages the team that maintains the production library services. He works with the other institutions involved in the Core Integration effort to specify, develop, and provide new digital library technologies to the more than a hundred NSF-funded projects involved in the NSDL program.

As an administrator, he serves as director of information technology for computing and information science. He helps provide oversight for the Computer Facilities Support group, represents CIS to the campus-wide IT Managers Council, and focuses on a number of issues including IT policy, software acquisition, and computer security. He received his PhD in computer science from Cornell in 1981.

Call for Nominations for the 2008 ACS National Awards

Nominations for 53 national awards administered by the ACS to be presented in 2008 are being solicited. See the full announcement for more details.

Upcoming Tangled Bank

Make sure to checkout the next Tangled Bank on July 19, 2006, at Salto Sobrius. Entries to be included can be submitted to host@tangledbank.net.

Virtual Skies Tutorials

The Virtual Skies website was developed by NASA Ames Education Division and is funded in part by Aviation Operations Systems and the Aerospace Education Coordinating Committee (AECC). It is designed for use by high school teachers and their classes, homeschool teachers and students in grades 9 - 12 as well as aviation enthusiasts (pilots and passengers alike). Within this Web site you will be able to explore the world of air traffic management and learn more about NASA research in aviation operations systems and aviation safety.

It offers the following sections:

  • Aviation Weather
  • Aviation Research
  • Airport Design
  • Air Traffic Management
  • Navigation
  • Communications
  • Aeronautics

(VIA: The Scout Report, June 23, 2006)

New Eminent Scholar at Case

Crain's Cleveland Business (July 11, 2006) announced that Dr. Norman Tien, chair of Case’s department of electrical engineering and computer science and Nord Professor of Engineering, was named the Ohio Eminent Scholar in condensed matter physics. See full story for more details.

(VIA: Case Daily, July 12, 2006)

Informing the General Public about Nanotechnology

On October 6, 2005, the National Science Foundation (NSF) has announced a series of initiatives that will greatly expand efforts to inform the general public about nanotechnology, and to explore the implications of that fast-moving field for society as a whole.

The Nanoscale Informal Science Education Network

NSF has selected the Museum of Science, Boston, along with the Science Museum of Minnesota and the Exploratorium in San Francisco, to create and lead this network, which will also include many other science museums and research institutions (partial list below). The $20 million, five-year effort represents the largest single award NSF has given to the science-museum community, and will be a cornerstone of the foundation's multidisciplinary Nanoscale Science and Engineering Education program.

Nanotechnology in Society
NSF has selected the University of California, Santa Barbara, and Arizona State University in Tempe, Ariz., to create two new Centers for Nanotechnology in Society. These centers will support research and education on nanotechnology and social change, as well as educational and public outreach activities, and international collaborations.

In addition, building on previously supported efforts, the foundation has funded nanotechnology-in-society projects at the University of South Carolina and at Harvard University.

ChemDB at University of California, Irvine

ChemDB is a public database of small molecules available on the Web. ChemDB is built using the digital catalogs of over a hundred vendors and other public sources and is annotated with information derived from these sources as well as from computational methods, such as predicted solubility and three-dimensional structure. It supports multiple molecular formats and is periodically updated, automatically whenever possible. The current version of the database contains approximately 4.1 million commercially available compounds and 8.2 million counting isomers. The database includes a user-friendly graphical interface, chemical reactions capabilities, as well as unique search capabilities.

Additional information:
ChemDB: a public database of small molecules and related chemoinformatics resources
Jonathan Chen, S. Joshua Swamidass, Yimeng Dou, Jocelyne Bruand, and Pierre Baldi
Bioinformatics 2005 21(22):4133-4139

(Thank you to Gary Wiggins on the Chemical Information Sources Discussion List - CHMINF-L for pointing out this resource.)

Japanese Science Directory

Science Links Japan is a topically arranged directory of online information resources for science and technology in Japan. Japan's scientific and technical information (STI) scattered across or isolated on the Internet have been collected and categorized under major topics. The Website aims to provide ease of access to Japan's STI for non-Japanese researchers, policy makers and many others who need Japan's STI.

Most of the contents come from information generated/compiled in the public sector, such as the government, universities, R&D institutes and STI institutes.

Science Links Japan has been compiled with a sharp focus on URL resources available in the English language. URL resources available only in the Japanese language also have been selected from the viewpoint of comprehensiveness and importance.

Tangled Bank #56

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Now for a Tangled Bank hosted by an Engineering Librarian...

General science, biology, and medicine are not my typical subject areas as I usually highlight resources in engineering and electronic resources available from my library. I occasionally branch off into medicine and biology as I support faculty and students conducting research in biomedical engineering.

Good science is important for everyone, and I hope this Tangled Bank promotes further discussion and thoughts, as we explore the science in spacecraft, illness, global warming, butterflies, locust, Star Wars, sex, love, and many other topics.

Outfit a spacecraft with a huge but incredibly lightweight mirror, and it can travel indefinitely, without fuel, at speeds that eventually exceed those of conventional rocket-powered craft. Joe Kissell presents Solar Sails - The next big thing in space travel posted at Interesting Thing of the Day.

Explore some of the research findings that suggest that there is an epigenetic basis to the development of lupus, an autoimmune disease that affects nearly 200 million Americans. Trevor Covert at Epigenetics News shares The Epigenetics of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE).

Jeremy Bruno at The Voltage Gate took a closer look at a recent Oprah show that discussed global warming by looking at a few inaccuracies and the shows reliance on propaganda rather than facts.

GrrlScientist presents Another Origin of Species posted at Living the Scientific Life. This essay describes an elegant Nature paper that investigates the role of homoploid hybridization in creating a new species of butterfly. (Homoploid hybridization is when the parent species and their hybrid offspring all have the same number of chromosomes).

The Different River presents WouldIntroducti

TOXNET - TOXicology Data NETwork

TOXNET (TOXicology Data NETwork) is a cluster of databases covering toxicology, hazardous chemicals, environmental health and related areas. It is managed by the Toxicology and Environmental Health Information Program (TEHIP) in the Division of Specialized Information Services (SIS) of the National Library of Medicine (NLM). TOXNET provides free access to and easy searching of the following databases:

  • HSDB (Hazardous Substances Data Bank)
  • IRIS (Integrated Risk Information System)
  • ITER (International Toxicity Estimates for Risk)
  • CCRIS (Chemical Carcinogenesis Research Information System)
  • GENE-TOX (Genetic Toxicology)
  • Tox Town
  • Household Products Database
  • Haz-Map
  • TOXMAP
  • LactMed (Drugs and Lactation)
  • TOXLINE
  • DART/ETIC (Development and Reproductive Toxicology/Environmental Teratology Information Center)
  • Toxics Release Inventory (TRI)
  • ChemIDplus
See the Factsheet for TOXNET: Toxicology Data Network for detailed descriptions.

Tangled Bank Host on July 5th

UPDATE: Here is the Tangled Bank I am hosting.

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I will be hosting the Tangled Bank on July 5th. Submit items by email.

Nanotechnology - Unknown Risks and Future Prospects

Charles Piller (Los Angeles Times, June 1, 2006) explores nanotechnology from safety to future prospects. The related graphic contains quite interesting information. For example, U.S. patents in nanotechnology increased from 1000 in 1990 to over 5000 in 2003. The U.S. also granted approximately 5 times as many patents in nanotechnology than any other country in 2003. The U.S., Europe, and Japan have all contributed over a billion dollars each to nanotechnology research. Make sure to check out the related PDF that describes terminology of various nanostructures.

(VIA: Quick Picks, June 2, 2006)

Chemistry Between Women & Science

The Chronicle of Higher Education (Volume 52, Issue 38, Page A10, May 26, 2006), in an article called The Chemistry Between Women & Science, interviewed three women about their career paths and why so few women are in academic science careers.

(VIA: Quick Picks, May 29, 2006)

PROGRESS - Women Chemists and Chemical Engineers

PROGRESS is a three-year pilot project launched in 2002 by the American Chemical Society to develop, test, and evaluate 7 new programs aimed at facilitating the full participation and advancement of women chemists and chemical engineers. Its goals are to assist entry-level professionals find employment and guide and support early and mid-career professionals seeking advancement.

(VIA: Quick Picks, May 29, 2006)

First Open Access Nanotechnology Journal from Major Publisher

Springer and the Nano Research Society have announced a new partnership to publish Nanoscale Research Letters (NRL), which will be the first nanotechnology journal from a major commercial publisher to publish articles with open access. The new journal provides an interdisciplinary forum for the open communication of scientific and technological advances in the creation and use of objects at the nanometer scale. The first open access articles are scheduled to appear on Springer's online platform, SpringerLink, in July 2006.

Read the full announcement for more information.

(VIA: LISNews, June 12, 2006)

Beilstein database exceeds ten million reactions

MDL Information Systems GmbH is pleased to announce that the Beilstein database now provides more than ten million structure-searchable reactions. Passing this important milestone emphasizes the enduring value of the Beilstein database as the essential first step in chemical discovery. See the full press release for more information.


Beilstein Crossfire is one of the several hundred databases available to the Case community.

MOLTABLE - Chemoinformatics Portal & its Application in Bioinformatics

When a potentially useful drug is designed or discovered, it must be delivered in a way that maximizes its ability to benefit patients.

The Moltable initiatives to discover drug candidates against CANCER, AIDS, Malaria and other potentially devastating infectious diseases through chemoinformatics research. Drug candidates in various stages of research are being analyzed to discover new and promising candidates. Dynamic QSAR initiatives through 'focused' virtual library design and the results will be made 'open access' through Moltable portal (National Chemical Laboratory, Pune, India).

The portal includes links to projects, a repository for molecules, and various other resources.

Isaac Newton's "Alchemical Notebooks" Available Online

The Chymistry of Isaac Newton is producing a scholarly online edition of Newton's alchemical manuscripts integrated with new research on Newton's chymistry. To date, about seven hundred pages have been transcribed and encoded in TEI/XML. Of these, roughly six hundred have been edited and are available online, including Newton's Most Complete Laboratory Notebook.

Isaac Newton, like Albert Einstein, is a quintessential symbol of the human intellect and its ability to decode the secrets of nature. Newton's fundamental contributions to science include the quantification of gravitational attraction, the discovery that white light is actually a mixture of immutable spectral colors, and the formulation of the calculus. Yet there is another, more mysterious side to Newton that is imperfectly known, a realm of activity that spanned some thirty years of his life, although he kept it largely hidden from his contemporaries and colleagues. We refer to Newton's involvement in the discipline of alchemy, or as it was often called in seventeenth-century England, "chymistry."
(VIA: Librarian In Black, April 14, 2006)

International Conference on Chemoinformatics - August 2006

National Chemical Laboratory Pune, India is planning a two-day International Conference on Chemoinformatics during 7-8 August 2006 which would be participated by eminent scientist and professors in this specialized area from both academia and industries.

Several distinguished scientists from Germany, UK, USA etc. along with Indian scientists are participating in this important meeting. The conference will bring together more than 100 participants for this scholarly event focusing on the futuristic application of cheminformatics in medicinal chemistry, material science, structure elucidation and structure activity/property/toxicity relationship studies, high performance computing, chemical data mining etc., Other participants would present oral and poster presentations of their work.

Biointerphases - New Open Access Journal

The Biointerphases journal, an open access journal for the biomaterials interface community, provides an interdisciplinary platform for scientific exchange among the biology, chemistry, physics, and materials sciences communities. It offers a discussion forum for rapid dissemination of scientific theories, results, and interpretations. Biointerphases serves as a global vehicle for the biomaterials interface community as well as a platform that encourages dialog between scientists and the public with respect to cogent policy issues.

[About Biointerphases]

Biointerphases is devoted to Articles of original research, Reviews, a "Myth and Reality" section addressing controversial models and experiments, Editorial Commentary/Letters to the Editor, Perspectives on Evolving Research, Reports on Interdisciplinary Research Programs and Opinionated Essays.

Biointerphases will include all topics relevant to the study and understanding of interfaces and confined phases in biomaterial science and biophysics, e. g. such as interface spectroscopy, in vivo mechanisms, in vitro mechanisms, interface modeling, adhesion phenomena, protein-surface interactions, cell-surface interactions, biomembranes on a chip, biosensors / biodiagnostics, bio-surface modification, the nano-bio interface, biotribology / biorheology, molecular recognition, cell patterning for function, polyelectrolyte surfaces, and ambient diagnostic methods. Biointerphases is freely available online, and will be available in an annual bound volume for a nominal fee.

Mathematical Imagery

Explore the art in mathematics from the American Mathematical Society's Mathematical Imagery website. Explore the cover art of the Notices of the American Mathematical Society, the math and artwork of origami, the art of mathematical formulas, and various other galleries.

(VIA: The Scout Report, May 26, 2006 - Volume 12, Number 21)


[Overview of the AMS]
Founded in 1888 to further mathematical research and scholarship, the American Mathematical Society fulfills its mission through programs and services that promote mathematical research and its uses, strengthen mathematical education, and foster awareness and appreciation of mathematics and its connections to other disciplines and to everyday life.

The Society has over 28,000 individual members and 550 institutional members in the United States and around the world. Programs and services for AMS members and the mathematical community include professional programs such as meetings and conferences, surveys, employment services; publications including Mathematical Reviews (a database of nearly 2 million items covering over 60 years of mathematics literature), journals, and over 3,000 books in print; support for Young Scholars Programs and the Mathematical Moments program of the Public Awareness Office; resources such as MR Lookup for researchers and authors; and a Washington office that connects the mathematical community with the broader scientific community and with decision makers who determine science funding.

Open Access in Medicine

Open Access for the Medical Librarian
Heather Morrison & Andrew Waller
Delivered at the Canadian Health Libraries Association 2006: Pearls of Wisdom, Vancouver, British Columbia.

ABSTRACT:
The most important aspects of open access for the medical librarian are presented. Reasons for open access include access to research information, access to taxpayer-funded research, facilitation of evidence-based medicine, equity of access, promotion of author control, and controlling library costs. The two primary approaches to open access, via author self-archiving and open access publishing, are presented. Key open access policy developments are highlighted. Many of the major policy initiatives of the moment are from the research funders. From the researcher funders' point of view, open access means more research impact, more real-world impact when professionals can access the literature, and value is illustrated to the taxpayer, building support for further research funding. The world's largest medical research funders, including the U.S. National Institute of Health and the Wellcome Trust, have public access policies, and many more policies are in development. For example, two weeks ago the Federal Research Public Access Act was introduced in the U.S. Senate. One of the essential elements of open access policy is ensuring that researchers are required, not requested, to deposit works. In Canada, the Canadian Institutes of Health Research has a policy in development called Access to Products of Research; public comments are due May 15, 2006. The dramatic growth of open access - over 2,220 journals in DOAJ, over 7.3 million items in an OAIster search - is discussed, as is the idea of new roles for librarians in an open access environment.

Improving Science Education in the U.S.

Nudging the NSF on Education
Inside Higher Ed
May 4, 2006

American science and math competitiveness couldn’t be a hotter topic in Congress right now if it were made in a fusion reactor.

Proposed legislation would have the National Science Foundation get to work on cultivating science and engineering majors at the college level, and providing extensive professional development for pre-college science teachers.

The legislation includes funding for science and engineering departments at universities to create training programs for school teachers, improvements in undergraduate instruction in sciences, and scholarships.

Periodic Table of Data

The Periodic Table of Data is a visual database of physical and thermochemical properties of the chemical elements. It includes an interactive periodic table, visualization of properties, graphs, tables of data, energy level diagrams, and games. The data in this resource has been taken from The Royal Society of Chemistry Electronic Data Book CD, London: Royal Society of Chemistry, 2002, with some minor corrections for consistency.


[About RSC]
The RSC is the largest organisation in Europe for advancing the chemical sciences. Supported by a worldwide network of members and an international publishing business, our activities span education, conferences, science policy and the promotion of chemistry to the public.

Internet Searches: Librarians do it Better

At the 2006 Medical Library Association's annual meeting came the results of a study that showed "cancer patients are more likely to find what they are looking for with a librarian-mediated search instead of going it alone."

  • 65 percent of patients said they were not able to obtain the information that the librarians sent to them from any other source
  • Additional 30 percent said the librarian provided some new information
  • Only 4 percent said they found all the same information on their own

Chmoggle - Chemical Information Search Engine

UPDATE:
Under pressure from Google, Chmoogle is now called eMolecules.


On November 18, 2005, eMolecules, Inc. announced the launch of Chmoogle.

Chmoogle wants to be the world's leading free open-access chemistry search engine. Chmoogle's mission is to discover, curate and index all of the public chemical information in the world, and make it available to the public. Chmoogle distinguishes itself by extremely fast searches, an appealing presentation of results, and high-quality chemical drawings. Chmoogle discovers sources of chemical data by searching the internet, and receives submissions from data providers such as chemical suppliers and academic researchers.

Chmoogle searches chemical information by drawn chemical structures, IUPAC name, or by entering SMILES nomenclature (Simplified Molecular Input Line Entry Specification).

The Chmoogle web site also includes Cheminformatics 101 - An introduction to the Computer Science and Chemistry of Chemical Information Systems.

Virtual Visit of the Canadian Space Agency

The Canadian Space Agency (CSA) was established in 1989 by the Canadian Space Agency Act. The agency operates like a government department. The president is the equivalent of a deputy minister and reports to the Minister of Industry. The president oversees five core functions: Space Programs, Space Technologies, Space Science, Canadian Astronaut Office, Space Operations. He also looks after six executive functions (Audit, Evaluation and Review; Corporate Management; Communications; Strategic Development; External Relations; Government Liaison) and three Corporate functions (Legal Services, Administration, and Human Resources). The President is supported by the Senior Vice-President and the Vice-President, Science, Technology and Programs.

Take a virtual tour of the John H. Chapman Space Centre. It is really well done and informative. It also makes a nice example if someone were creating a virtual tour of a library or laboratory within their organization.

(Via: The Scout Report, Volume 12, Number 20, May 19, 2006)

National Institutes of Health: Office of Science Education

The Office of Science Education (OSE) coordinates science education activities at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and develops and sponsors science education projects in house. These programs serve elementary, secondary, and college students and teachers and the public. Users can explore the content by subject area, grade level, or format.

Students might find the career resources quite helpful when looking for an internship or job.

See About Us for more information.

(VIA: The Scout Report, Volume 12, Number 20, May 19, 2006)

Citation Advantage of Open Access Articles

The article Citation Advantage of Open Access Articles (PLoS Biology, volume 4, issue 5, May 2006) described a study that looked at the number of citations of open access articles versus pay publications.

Articles published as an immediate OA article on the journal site have higher impact than self-archived or otherwise openly accessible OA articles. We found strong evidence that, even in a journal that is widely available in research libraries, OA articles are more immediately recognized and cited by peers than non-OA articles published in the same journal. OA is likely to benefit science by accelerating dissemination and uptake of research findings.

EEVL - Changes

From the middle of 2006 there will be some major changes to the current service. As you may know, EEVL is one of a number of Internet subject gateways that together form the Resource Discovery Network (RDN).

As a result of a detailed planning and consultation process, the RDN service is currently undergoing extensive re-structuring and re-branding. The purpose of this exercise is to create a new more consolidated service with closer integration of subject areas, and to provide a single interface for our users.

The current eight subject gateways will be re-organised to create four major subject groups:

(Via: STLQ, May 9, 2006, TechXtra - A New Resource for Searching in Engineering, Mathematics, and Computing)

Science & Engineering State Profiles: 2003-04

The Division of Science Resources Statistics (SRS) of the National Science Foundation (NSF) publishes Science and Engineering State Profiles annually. The 2003–04 report, published only on the Web, includes a data source page and a set of 52 one-page science and engineering (S&E) profiles (in Excel) that summarize state-specific data on personnel and finances. Rankings and totals are for the 50 states; Washington, DC; and Puerto Rico.

I have included a portion of Ohio's statistics.

Ohio Science.bmp

(VIA: ResourceShelf, May 9, 2006)

Fuel Cell Mixes with Porn Company for Pseudo IPO

Here is an interesting way to quickly get to an initial public offering. A company that creates a membrane for methanol fuel cells used the old shell of a porn company to quickly go public.

From: CNET News.com Future Tech Blog, March 17, 2006

TechXtra (Formerly EEVL Xtra)

In October of 2005, I shared information on EEVL Xtra. It appears the new name is TechXtra.

From the press release:

TechXtra suite of free services simplifies access to technology information

TechXtra is a suite of ten freely available services which simplify access to a multitude of different types of technology information from a host of different sources.

TechXtra facilitates immediate access to the freely available full-text content of hundreds of thousands of eprints, technical reports, theses, articles, news items, job announcements and more. In cases where the full-text is not freely available, TechXtra provides links to vendors for pay-per-view options. TechXtra searches a combination of digital repositories, journal databases, technical reports servers, web information, news sources and more, all with a focus on technology information.

Anyone looking for information in technology will find TechXtra useful, especially researchers, academics, students and practitioners.

The suite of services includes:
Database Cross-Search - This searches over 4 million items from 25 different databases. Use this to find articles, key websites, theses and dissertations, books, industry news, new job announcements, technical reports, eprints, learning & teaching resources and the latest research in engineering, mathematics and computing. Sources include: Australian Research Repositories Online to the World, arXive (eprint archive in computer science, maths and related subjects), CiteSeer (research articles in computer science), Directory of Open Access Journals, ePrints UK (selected open archives in the UK), Copac (union catalogue from the Consortium of University Research Libraries), National Engineering Education Delivery System (digital library of learning resources), NASA Technical Reports (12 different NASA technical report series)... plus 18 other databases. More will be added in the near future.

The Very Latest Job Announcements - OneStep Jobs brings together the very latest job announcements from more than 35 top sources, and presents them in an easily accessible and searchable format in one place. The content is updated many times each day. Sources include: Jobs.ac.uk, ICErecruit, The Engineer, Redgoldfish, Jobsite, Engineeringjobs.co.uk, 4engineers.co.uk, Matchtech, TipTopJobs and more.

The Very Latest Industry News - OneStep Industry News brings together news feeds from over 80 top sources, and presents them in an easily accessible and searchable format. The content is updated many times each day. Sources include: The Engineer Online, Engineeringtalk, New Scientist, scenta, Moreover, Yenra, Control Engineering News, Design News, EurekAlert, Slashdot, PC Magazine, BBC Tech News and more.

Free Trade Magazine Subscriptions & Technical Document Downloads - Hundreds of trade publications and their advertisers want to give qualifying individuals their publications. It's worth it to them to give you the magazine free because you need the information and products described, and their advertisers need a vehicle to deliver their message which justifies the cost of giving you subscriptions for free. In addition, this service now includes free Webcasts, live Webinars, informative eBooks, interactive CD-ROMs, and numerous whitepapers.

On-Line Bookstore - TechXtra users save up to 35% on any title from this bookstore from Pearson Education - books on everything from Computer Graphics & Design, to Programming, Software, Careers and Personal Development titles. Postage is free within the UK and Europe.

Offshore Engineering Information Service - This service gives information about publications and meetings dealing with: oil and gas exploration and production; offshore health, safety and environmental protection; resources of the seabed and renewable energy; and marine technology.

Discovery Guides - Free indepth reports on topical engineering, mathematical and technology issues.

Information about Validated Engineering Design Data - This subset of ESDU contains over 1,300 abstracts of data item design guides. Access to the full text is via subscription only.

Recent Advances in Manufacturing - A database of bibliographic information for manufacturing and related areas, covering items in over 500 niche and mainstream journals and magazines, plus details of books, videos and conference proceedings.

Selected links to top sources of technology information - Internet tutorials, newsletters and gateways.

TechXtra harvests data from external sources using standard protocols such as Z39.50 and OAI-PMH.

TechXtra is an initiative of the ICBL and the Library, at Heriot-Watt University. The ICBL is also the base of the PerX Project, which has produced a Pilot to help scope future developments in cross-searching. Feedback on the Pilot would be much appreciated. A 60 second survey is available, and those providing feedback will be entered into a draw to win £100 of Amazon vouchers.

For more information about TechXtra, contact:
Roddy MacLeod
Senior Subject Librarian
Heriot-Watt University Library
Edinburgh
0131 451 3576
r.a.macleod@hw.ac.uk

(VIA: STLQ, May 9, 2006, TechXtra - A New Resource for Searching in Engineering, Mathematics, and Computing)

Emerald Engineering - Free Access until September 2006

Emerald Engineering showcases practical and theoretical insightful articles, interviews, case studies, viewpoints and more. Whether you are an academic, researcher or industry practitioner, Emerald Engineering can help you find solutions to problems and keep up to date with current research, industry news, trends and debates by providing access to quality engineering information.

Free Access!!!
Emerald Engineering will be available on three levels: level one will be unrestricted access for all; level two will feature additional content and will be available to registered members; and level three will have even more content for Emerald Engineering journal and database subscribers. However, in order to celebrate the launch of this essential resource, we are delighted to give access to the whole of Emerald Engineering completely free of any restrictions until September 2006. Follow the link on this page, then on the Insight login page simply click the "login" button to return to Emerald Engineering with FREE full site access.

It appears four subject categories currently exist: Advanced Automation, Computational Mathematics, Electronics Manufacture & Packaging, and Materials Science & Engineering.

NIH Research

The NIH Budget and the Future of Biomedical Research
Joseph Loscalzo, M.D., Ph.D.
The New England Journal of Medicine
Volume 354, Number 16, Pages 1665-1667, April 20, 2006

The "first true budgeted reduction in NIH support since 1970" is predicted for 2007. See the full article for what this may mean for biomedical research.

Case Center for Proteomics Inaugural Symposium

The Case Center for Proteomics Symposium will be on May 24 from 1 to 5 p.m. in the Wolstein Research Building Auditorium. During the symposium, four renowned researchers in the area of proteomics and mass spectrometry will make presentations, followed by a reception in the Wolstein lobby. For more information and updates regarding the seminar go to http://casemed.case.edu/proteomics/.

(Via: Case Daily - May 05, 2006)

Sigma-Aldrich Launches Collection of Biological Pathways

On April 6, 2006, Sigma-Aldrich announced the launch of PathFinder, an innovative online resource that offers a free and comprehensive collection of interactive biological pathways.

PathFinder presents biological signaling and metabolic pathways in an interactive, graphical representation of the cell that researchers can use to explore the relationships between different pathway components. The online tool provides links to appropriate, high-quality products from Sigma-Aldrich's first-in-class range, including small molecules, antibodies, enzymes, QPCR components and siRNAis for gene knockdown. Additional support is provided through links to detailed product descriptions and technical articles. PathFinder, developed in conjunction with bioinformatics specialist Protein Lounge, will be launched initially with some 20 pathways. Once completed later this year, the application will contain over 100 signal transduction pathways.

See the full announcement for more information.

(Via: Knowledgespeak, April 10, 2006)

Journal@rchive - Electronic Archive Initiative

Journal@rchive is an archive site of J-STAGE operated by the Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST). On Journal@rchive, academic journals scanned through the Electronic Archive Initiative are released from their first issues, including those issued in the 19th century. The Initiative commenced by JST in FY2005 aiming at two goals: (1) to preserve of academic heritages of Japan, and (2) to further promote worldwide distribution of Japanese research results.

[About J-STAGE - Introduction]

In order to maintain and develop Japan's science and technology research at an international level, it is important to disseminate outstanding research and development results to the world instantaneously. To that end, it is important to computerize bulletins of academic societies and research papers that are currently appeared on paper by user organizations and release them to the appearance on the Internet.

In order to support the information transmission function of user organizations, the "Japan Science and Technology Information Aggregator, Electronic" (J-STAGE), developed by Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), set up the hardware and software necessary for electronic journal release within JST to provide services 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. By taking advantage of the hardware and software, the user organizations are able to computerize bulletins of academic societies and research papers currently appeared with ease and at low cost. Computerrized documents can be accessed from anywhere in the world with this system. This project also links up with the National Institute of Informatics (formerly the Ministry of Education National Center for Science Information Systems (NACSIS)).

EECS Professor Awarded $1.2 Million for Bioinformatics Research

Jing Li, an assistant professor with the electrical engineering and computer science department, was recently awarded a National Institutes of Health R01 grant for approximately $1.2 million to be used for interdisciplinary research in bioinformatics and computational biology.

(Source: Case Daily, April, 20, 2006.)

Minority Degrees in Science, Technology, Engineering & Math

Increasing the Success of Minority Students in Science and Technology by the American Council on Education (ACE) on April, 3, 2006

African American and Hispanic students begin college interested in majoring in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) fields at rates similar to those of white and Asian-American students, and persist in these fields through their third year of study, but do not earn their bachelor’s degrees at the same rate as their peers, according to a new analysis conducted by the American Council on Education (ACE).
See full press release for more data.

(Originally shared on the Curious Cat Science & Engineering Blog on April, 21, 2006.)

[About ACE]

Founded in 1918, the American Council on Education (ACE) is the nation's unifying voice for higher education. ACE serves as a consensus leader on key higher education issues and seeks to influence public policy through advocacy, research, and program initiatives. See more at About ACE.

Take an "Open Book" Quiz to win a Video iPod

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Take the Knovel University Challenge!

Take an "Open Book" Quiz...Knovel Style! You Could Win a 30G Video iPod! Answer all 5 questions on the entry correctly and you could win a 30G Video iPod! (Hint: Use www.knovel.com!)

Only complete entries will be eligible to win. This contest is open to current students in all schools with trials and subscriptions to the Knovel Service. One entry per person. The contest starts today, 4/19/06. You have until (midnight) Wednesday, May 31 to submit your answers and contact information (full name, school, mailing address, email address, and time to complete) via the link at www.info.knovel.com/ipod/.

All entries with a total of 5 correct answers will be placed into a random drawing for the 30G Video iPod, which will take place on June 1, 2006. The Prize will be awarded to one entrant in the US, one entrant in Asia, one entrant in Europe and one entrant in all other regions. All winners must present correct answers to all 5 quiz questions.

The winners will be contacted by Knovel Corporation.


Case does subscribe to Knovel, so use this as a chance to explore what you are missing.

BioMed Central Journals Have RSS Feeds

BioMed Central offers RSS feeds for each of their journals.

[What is BioMed Central?]

BioMed Central is an independent publishing house committed to providing immediate open access to peer-reviewed biomedical research. Read more here...

Indian Institute of Astrophysics Repository

Indian Institute of Astrophysics Repository is the digital repository of publications of Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore, India, developed to capture, disseminate and preserve research publications of IIAP. You can search, browse and access full text of these publications from the repository. This Repository also hosts papers published in Bulletin of the Astronomical Society of India.

[Contents of IIAP Repository]

IIAP Repository contains full text of research publications and Ph.d theses of individuals from Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore. In addition, this repository also hosts papers from the journal Bulletin of the Astronomical Society India from Vol. 1, 1973. Presently journal articles, conference papers and preprints can be submitted to this repository and we invite all the researches to send the soft copy of your papers to library@iiap.res.in or chris@iiap.res.in and we will take care of uploading the papers into the repository.

Recently we have included Archival collection as another community in the repository. This Archival collection will include the various archival materials belonging to 18th,19th, & 20th century available in the Institute. These materials are in the form of hand-written manuscripts, photographs, Annual Reports and instruments and their descriptions. The full text of research publications of our directors of Madras Observatory and Kodaikanal Observatory will also be part of this archival collection.

[About Indian Institute of Astrophysics]

The Indian Institute of Astrophysics is a premier national centre devoted to research in astronomy, astrophysics and related physics. It traces its origin back to an observatory set up in 1786 at Madras which from the year 1792 began to formally function at its Nungambakkam premises as the Madras Observatory. With headquarters at Bangalore, the Institute's laboratories are currently active at Kodaikanal,Kavalur, Gauribidanur,Hanle and Hosakote.

American Chemical Society Journals - RSS Feeds

Each of the American Chemical Society journals offer RSS feeds that include their Articles ASAP and complete Table of Contents.

The Library of Congress: Webcasts

The Library of Congress has made over 300 webcasts available in a variety of topics. The site includes talks, discussions, and conferences, plus webcasts from the National Book Festival. Subject categories include biography & history, culture & performing arts, education, government, poetry & literature, religion, and science & technology.

Examples of science & technology webcasts include:

  • Got Game
  • Chemical Warfare from WWI to Al-Qaeda
  • Dawn of the Space Age
  • Science, Ethics and the Law
  • Cutting Edge Research

(Originally highlighted by The Scout Report, January 27, 2006 - Volume 12, Number 4)

Track Biomedical Papers Being Discussed by Bloggers

Postgenomic collates posts from life science blogs and then does useful and interesting things with that data. For example, you can see which papers are currently being discussed by neurologists, or which web pages are being linked to by bioinformaticians. It's sort of like a hot papers meeting with the entire biomed blogging community.

A RSS feed is available to track the "Posts of the day", "Current hot stories", or "Current hot papers".

[About Postgenomic]

Postgenomic aggregates posts from life science blogs and then does useful and interesting things with that data.

For example, it allows you to get an instant picture of which web sites are being heavily linked to by researchers in the medical sciences, or which papers are being cited or reviewed most often by bioinformaticians, or which buzzwords are being used the most frequently by evolutionary biologists.

It's sort of like a hot papers meeting with the entire biomed blogging community.

Sort of.

Postgenomic's primary purpose is to act as a central repository for reviews of scientific papers and for conference reports. You can help with this by adding some very simple semantic markup to your blog posts when you write a review of a paper. In this context a "review" isn't necessarily a particularly long or critical assessment of the paper (though it could be): it's simply any information that other researchers might find useful.

(Originally shared on the Science Library Pad, March 3, 2006)

Virtual Journal for Biomedical Optics

In January of 2006, the Optical Society of America (OSA) launched the Virtual Journal for Biomedical Optics.

[About Virtual Journal for Biomedical Optics]

The Virtual Journal for Biomedical Optics (ISSN: 1931-1532) consists of selected articles recently published in OSA's peer-reviewed journals. For the virtual journal, biomedical optics is considered to include research involving the interface between light and medicine or biology. Articles are selected by the editor, Dr. Gregory W. Faris, on the basis of relevancy using OCIS codes and abstract keywords.

Each issue comprises articles published in the source journals during the previous month. Thus the February virtual journal issue features articles originally published in January. Additional content such as editorials, meeting announcements, tutorials and reviews, and articles from other publications will also be solicited and published as the virtual journal expands its scope over time.

Citations to articles in the Virtual Journal for Biomedical Optics should be made to the original source journals.

[About OSA]

Founded in 1916, the Optical Society of America (OSA) was organized to increase and diffuse the knowledge of optics, pure and applied; to promote the common interests of investigators of optical problems, of designers and of users of optical apparatus of all kinds; and to encourage cooperation among them. The purposes of the Society are scientific, technical and educational. Read more at...

MEMS Technology and Biomedical Applications - Conference

The Gordon Research Conference on "MEMS Technology and Biomedical Applications" will be held at Connecticut College, New London, CT during the week of June 25-30, 2006. There is an opportunity for researchers and their students to present their work at a poster session during the conference. More information about the conference, including links to registration can be found at http://www.grc.uri.edu/programs/2006/mems.htm.

Session topics include:

  • Novel BioMEMS Sensing
  • Chemical Specificity for BioMEMS Sensing
  • BioMaterials for BioMEMS
  • MEMS Technology as a Biomedical Device Platform
  • Biologically Inspired MEMS
  • Biofluidic Microsystems
  • Lab-on-a-Chip
  • Implantable MEMS Devices
  • Applications of BioMEMS in Human Health

Several Case speakers are listed, including:

  • Horst von Recum - "Activation of gene regulation by a drug delivery microchip"
  • Carlos Mastrangelo - Tentative Title: "Microfluidics chips for integrated DNA Assays"

Medical Information Day

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Tuesday, April 11, 2006, or 4-11, is "Medical Information Day". The observance recognizes the invaluable information and vast range of services medical librarians provide for their institutions and local communities.

Case is very lucky with the availability of medical information available to us through the Cleveland Health Sciences Library consisting of the Allen Memorial Medical Library and the Health Center Library.

(Thank you to ResourceShelf, April 9, 2006, for sharing this information.)

Investing In Nanotechnology

NanoFocus from Chemical & Engineering News (February 24, 2006) highlighted the increase in funding towards nanotechnology in 2006. Investing In Nanotechnology by Ann M. Thayer shared various measures of R&D investing, such as: