Entries in "Medicine & Healthcare" ( for this category only)

Ohio Collaborative Conference on Bioinformatics (OCCBIO)

The fourth annual Ohio Collaborative Conference on Bioinformatics will be hosted by Case Western Reserve University on June 15-17, 2009.

The conference provides an interdisciplinary forum for the discussion of methods, research findings, and experiences.

An important goal for the conference is to foster long-term collaborative relationships and networking opportunities within the domain of computational approaches to biology that benefit Ohio.

See: http://www.occbio.org/2009/index.shtml

Wii Preparation for Surgeons

Years ago we had reports that our Desert Storm pilots were better than their former colleagues, due to being raised as children with video games. Now, we a have a study that shows surgeons that warm up or train on Wii perform better in surgeries.

Game players scored nearly 50% higher on tool control and overall performance than other trainees.
Source: 'Wii warm-up' good for surgeons from BBC News (January 17, 2008)

MM&M Celebrates 40 Years of Interdisciplinary Discovery

The Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and the Department of Orthopaedics are hosting a two-day symposium April 3-4 to celebrate 40 years of interdisciplinary research in orthopaedic biomechanics through the Musculoskeletal Mechanics and Materials (MMM) Laboratories. The keynote speaker is Albert Burstein, one of the founders of the laboratory and internationally recognized for his seminal contributions to the understanding of bone biomechanics and total joint replacement design. The symposium will also include lectures by current faculty as well as engineers and clinicians in the field. Register online or call 368-5403.

[VIA: CASE DAILY, March 28, 2007]

Medical Dictionary

MedicineNet.com has published an online medical dictionary that contains over 16,000 medical terms.

From About Us:

MedicineNet, Inc. is owned and operated by WebMD and part of the WebMD Network.

MedicineNet.com is an online, healthcare media publishing company. It provides easy-to-read, in-depth, authoritative medical information for consumers via its robust, user-friendly, interactive web site.

[VIA: The Scout Report -- Volume 13, Number 7]

UK PubMed Central Launched

The British Library Press Release
UK PubMed Central Launched
9 January, 2007

From today scientists will be able to access a vast collection of biomedical research and to submit their own published results for inclusion in a new online resource. Based on a model currently used by the US National Institute of Health, UK PubMed Central (UKPMC) will provide free access to a permanent online archive of peer-reviewed research papers in the medical and life sciences. See: www.ukpmc.ac.uk.

See also PubMed Central (PMC), the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) free digital archive of biomedical and life sciences journal literature.

Online Encyclopedia of Medical Images

Effective January 1st, the entire OhioLINK community has access to Images.MD.

Images.MD, the online encyclopedia of medical images, compiles more than 55,000 images from more than 90 collections ranging from allergy to urology, each accompanied by detailed and informative text contributed by more than 2,000 medical experts.

Members of OhioLink have free access to full-sized, high quality images in step with the latest developments in medicine. By filling out a simple registration form, you can also start your own image library, create PowerPoint® presentations of images in your library, and order customized CD-ROMs of your favorite slides.

Case BME Professor Wins World Technology Award

P. Hunter Peckham, professor of biomedical engineering, recently received the 2006 World Technology Award for Health and Medicine. His research focuses on functional restoration of paralyzed arms in individuals with spinal cord injury.

The World Technology Network (WTN) is a global meeting ground, a virtual think tank, and an elite club whose members are all focused on the business and science of bringing important emerging technologies of all types (from biotech to new materials, from IT to new energy sources) into reality. The WTN's membership is comprised of approximately 1000 members from more than 60 countries, judged by their peers to be the most innovative in the technology world.

[VIA: Case Daily, December 1, 2006]

New Purchase - Encyclopedia of Biostatistics Online

The Encyclopedia of Biostatistics (2nd Ed.) offers the definitive reference to support the development and use of statistical methods for addressing the problems and critical issues that confront scientists, practitioners and policy makers engaged in the life and medical sciences. With the growing importance and application of biostatistics, reflected in the increasing number of statisticians employed in the pharmaceutical industry, healthcare sector and medical schools, this new edition will find widespread application in basic medical science; the planning, financing and distribution of health care; and the measurement of health care status and progress in the population.

The Encyclopedia now includes many contributions that focus on the rapid growth of bioinformatics and its pivotal role in studying the human genome.

  • Expanded and enhanced coverage of key topics including bioinformatics, clinical trials, computation, genetics, and Bayesian methods and applications
  • Containing over 1300 articles, 182 entirely new to this edition, with more than 300 revised and updated to reflect current research and developments
  • All encompassed in 8 extensively cross-referenced volumes
The Case community has access to the Encyclopedia of Biostatistics through the Research Database list. Eventually it will also appear in the library catalog.

CALL FOR PAPERS - Advanced Mining & Use of Life Science Information

CALL FOR PAPERS - Advanced mining and use of life science information, ACS Chicago, March 2007

You are invited to submit abstracts for a session entitled "Advanced mining and use of life science information" in the division of Chemical Information (CINF), co-sponsored with the CSA Trust, at the 233rd American Chemical Society meeting in Chicago, March 25-29, 2007

We are particularly interested in papers that address the mining of large volumes and diverse sources of chemical and life science information to aid in decision making in the drug discovery process. Potential topics include (but are not limited to):

  • Development or application of data mining techniques
  • Knowledge discovery on large chemical databases such as PubChem
  • Integrating textual and structural information
  • Design of interfaces and interaction tools for complex, diverse kinds of information
  • Database querying tools and interfaces
The presentation should last about 30 minutes, including time for questions. To submit an abstract, go to http://oasys.acs.org/acs/233nm/cinf/papers/index.cgi and select the "Advanced mining and use of life science information" session. Abstracts should be submitted no later than November 17th, 2006.

If you have questions, please feel free to contact David Wild at djwild @ indiana.edu. You can find out more information about the CSA Trust at http://www.csa-trust.org/.

David Wild
Session organizer

___________________________________________

Dr. David J. Wild, djwild @ indiana.edu
Assistant Professor

Indiana University School of Informatics

ph (812) 856-1848 - fax (812) 856-1995

1900 E. 10th St. Rm. 1128, Bloomington, IN 47406

web http://www.informatics.indiana.edu/djwild

Materials, Medicine, and Nanotechnology Summit in Cleveland

Innovators in medical devices, clinical practice, and biomedical research will gather at Cleveland Clinic Oct. 2-5 to discuss the latest materials advances and nanotechnology discoveries and how they are resulting in new medical applications.

The Materials, Medicine, and Nanotechnology Summit will be hosted by Cleveland Clinic, ASM International, and the Nano-Network as the anchor event of Nano-Week™ 2006, a five-day exploration of how nanotechnology is changing our world. The Summit is comprised of the biennial Cleveland Clinic NanoMedicine Summit and ASM's Materials & Processes for Medical Devices (MPMD) Conference and Exposition.

Advance registration closes September 24.

Nanomedicine Lab Registry & Portal

The Nanomedicine Lab Registry was compiled from Medline abstracts containing specific nanomedicine keyphrases. It only includes laboratories with 5 or more publications. It uses a database of citation histories compiled from open source journal article reference lists and a major OCR (optical character recognition) campaign on their entire reference library. Labs are ranked according to the citation rate of each individual article. For articles where they do not have sufficient data or were too new to have citation data, they used historical citation data from the journal and the principal investigator. The registry currently ranks the top 382 laboratories, with Chad Mirkin's lab garnering the highest score. Pat Couvreur, Royce Murray, Dave Reinhoudt and Ralph Weissleder rounded out the top 5. Their intention with the registry is to help new graduate students and postdocs to find high impact laboratories. This information is probably interesting to the general public as well if they are interested in the most productive labs.

Related is the Nanomedicine and Nanobiology Research portal that includes recent high impact publications, recent nanomedicine jobs, recent nanomedicine news, top ranked nanomedicine scientists, nanomedicine links, featured nanomedicine books, and nanomedicine conferences.

The Lab Registry is maintained by Ion Channel Media Group, and it operates a number of life science portals. It is founded by J. Christian Hesketh, who is trained in classical biophysics in Canada.

Upcoming Tangled Bank

Make sure to checkout the next Tangled Bank on July 19, 2006, at Salto Sobrius. Entries to be included can be submitted to host@tangledbank.net.

Tangled Bank #56

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Now for a Tangled Bank hosted by an Engineering Librarian...

General science, biology, and medicine are not my typical subject areas as I usually highlight resources in engineering and electronic resources available from my library. I occasionally branch off into medicine and biology as I support faculty and students conducting research in biomedical engineering.

Good science is important for everyone, and I hope this Tangled Bank promotes further discussion and thoughts, as we explore the science in spacecraft, illness, global warming, butterflies, locust, Star Wars, sex, love, and many other topics.

Outfit a spacecraft with a huge but incredibly lightweight mirror, and it can travel indefinitely, without fuel, at speeds that eventually exceed those of conventional rocket-powered craft. Joe Kissell presents Solar Sails - The next big thing in space travel posted at Interesting Thing of the Day.

Explore some of the research findings that suggest that there is an epigenetic basis to the development of lupus, an autoimmune disease that affects nearly 200 million Americans. Trevor Covert at Epigenetics News shares The Epigenetics of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE).

Jeremy Bruno at The Voltage Gate took a closer look at a recent Oprah show that discussed global warming by looking at a few inaccuracies and the shows reliance on propaganda rather than facts.

GrrlScientist presents Another Origin of Species posted at Living the Scientific Life. This essay describes an elegant Nature paper that investigates the role of homoploid hybridization in creating a new species of butterfly. (Homoploid hybridization is when the parent species and their hybrid offspring all have the same number of chromosomes).

The Different River presents WouldIntroducti

TOXNET - TOXicology Data NETwork

TOXNET (TOXicology Data NETwork) is a cluster of databases covering toxicology, hazardous chemicals, environmental health and related areas. It is managed by the Toxicology and Environmental Health Information Program (TEHIP) in the Division of Specialized Information Services (SIS) of the National Library of Medicine (NLM). TOXNET provides free access to and easy searching of the following databases:

  • HSDB (Hazardous Substances Data Bank)
  • IRIS (Integrated Risk Information System)
  • ITER (International Toxicity Estimates for Risk)
  • CCRIS (Chemical Carcinogenesis Research Information System)
  • GENE-TOX (Genetic Toxicology)
  • Tox Town
  • Household Products Database
  • Haz-Map
  • TOXMAP
  • LactMed (Drugs and Lactation)
  • TOXLINE
  • DART/ETIC (Development and Reproductive Toxicology/Environmental Teratology Information Center)
  • Toxics Release Inventory (TRI)
  • ChemIDplus
See the Factsheet for TOXNET: Toxicology Data Network for detailed descriptions.

Tangled Bank Host on July 5th

UPDATE: Here is the Tangled Bank I am hosting.

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I will be hosting the Tangled Bank on July 5th. Submit items by email.

Nanotechnology - Unknown Risks and Future Prospects

Charles Piller (Los Angeles Times, June 1, 2006) explores nanotechnology from safety to future prospects. The related graphic contains quite interesting information. For example, U.S. patents in nanotechnology increased from 1000 in 1990 to over 5000 in 2003. The U.S. also granted approximately 5 times as many patents in nanotechnology than any other country in 2003. The U.S., Europe, and Japan have all contributed over a billion dollars each to nanotechnology research. Make sure to check out the related PDF that describes terminology of various nanostructures.

(VIA: Quick Picks, June 2, 2006)

Biointerphases - New Open Access Journal

The Biointerphases journal, an open access journal for the biomaterials interface community, provides an interdisciplinary platform for scientific exchange among the biology, chemistry, physics, and materials sciences communities. It offers a discussion forum for rapid dissemination of scientific theories, results, and interpretations. Biointerphases serves as a global vehicle for the biomaterials interface community as well as a platform that encourages dialog between scientists and the public with respect to cogent policy issues.

[About Biointerphases]

Biointerphases is devoted to Articles of original research, Reviews, a "Myth and Reality" section addressing controversial models and experiments, Editorial Commentary/Letters to the Editor, Perspectives on Evolving Research, Reports on Interdisciplinary Research Programs and Opinionated Essays.

Biointerphases will include all topics relevant to the study and understanding of interfaces and confined phases in biomaterial science and biophysics, e. g. such as interface spectroscopy, in vivo mechanisms, in vitro mechanisms, interface modeling, adhesion phenomena, protein-surface interactions, cell-surface interactions, biomembranes on a chip, biosensors / biodiagnostics, bio-surface modification, the nano-bio interface, biotribology / biorheology, molecular recognition, cell patterning for function, polyelectrolyte surfaces, and ambient diagnostic methods. Biointerphases is freely available online, and will be available in an annual bound volume for a nominal fee.

Open Access in Medicine

Open Access for the Medical Librarian
Heather Morrison & Andrew Waller
Delivered at the Canadian Health Libraries Association 2006: Pearls of Wisdom, Vancouver, British Columbia.

ABSTRACT:
The most important aspects of open access for the medical librarian are presented. Reasons for open access include access to research information, access to taxpayer-funded research, facilitation of evidence-based medicine, equity of access, promotion of author control, and controlling library costs. The two primary approaches to open access, via author self-archiving and open access publishing, are presented. Key open access policy developments are highlighted. Many of the major policy initiatives of the moment are from the research funders. From the researcher funders' point of view, open access means more research impact, more real-world impact when professionals can access the literature, and value is illustrated to the taxpayer, building support for further research funding. The world's largest medical research funders, including the U.S. National Institute of Health and the Wellcome Trust, have public access policies, and many more policies are in development. For example, two weeks ago the Federal Research Public Access Act was introduced in the U.S. Senate. One of the essential elements of open access policy is ensuring that researchers are required, not requested, to deposit works. In Canada, the Canadian Institutes of Health Research has a policy in development called Access to Products of Research; public comments are due May 15, 2006. The dramatic growth of open access - over 2,220 journals in DOAJ, over 7.3 million items in an OAIster search - is discussed, as is the idea of new roles for librarians in an open access environment.

Internet Searches: Librarians do it Better

At the 2006 Medical Library Association's annual meeting came the results of a study that showed "cancer patients are more likely to find what they are looking for with a librarian-mediated search instead of going it alone."

  • 65 percent of patients said they were not able to obtain the information that the librarians sent to them from any other source
  • Additional 30 percent said the librarian provided some new information
  • Only 4 percent said they found all the same information on their own

National Institutes of Health: Office of Science Education

The Office of Science Education (OSE) coordinates science education activities at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and develops and sponsors science education projects in house. These programs serve elementary, secondary, and college students and teachers and the public. Users can explore the content by subject area, grade level, or format.

Students might find the career resources quite helpful when looking for an internship or job.

See About Us for more information.

(VIA: The Scout Report, Volume 12, Number 20, May 19, 2006)

NIH Research

The NIH Budget and the Future of Biomedical Research
Joseph Loscalzo, M.D., Ph.D.
The New England Journal of Medicine
Volume 354, Number 16, Pages 1665-1667, April 20, 2006

The "first true budgeted reduction in NIH support since 1970" is predicted for 2007. See the full article for what this may mean for biomedical research.

Case Center for Proteomics Inaugural Symposium

The Case Center for Proteomics Symposium will be on May 24 from 1 to 5 p.m. in the Wolstein Research Building Auditorium. During the symposium, four renowned researchers in the area of proteomics and mass spectrometry will make presentations, followed by a reception in the Wolstein lobby. For more information and updates regarding the seminar go to http://casemed.case.edu/proteomics/.

(Via: Case Daily - May 05, 2006)

EECS Professor Awarded $1.2 Million for Bioinformatics Research

Jing Li, an assistant professor with the electrical engineering and computer science department, was recently awarded a National Institutes of Health R01 grant for approximately $1.2 million to be used for interdisciplinary research in bioinformatics and computational biology.

(Source: Case Daily, April, 20, 2006.)

BioMed Central Journals Have RSS Feeds

BioMed Central offers RSS feeds for each of their journals.

[What is BioMed Central?]

BioMed Central is an independent publishing house committed to providing immediate open access to peer-reviewed biomedical research. Read more here...

Track Biomedical Papers Being Discussed by Bloggers

Postgenomic collates posts from life science blogs and then does useful and interesting things with that data. For example, you can see which papers are currently being discussed by neurologists, or which web pages are being linked to by bioinformaticians. It's sort of like a hot papers meeting with the entire biomed blogging community.

A RSS feed is available to track the "Posts of the day", "Current hot stories", or "Current hot papers".

[About Postgenomic]

Postgenomic aggregates posts from life science blogs and then does useful and interesting things with that data.

For example, it allows you to get an instant picture of which web sites are being heavily linked to by researchers in the medical sciences, or which papers are being cited or reviewed most often by bioinformaticians, or which buzzwords are being used the most frequently by evolutionary biologists.

It's sort of like a hot papers meeting with the entire biomed blogging community.

Sort of.

Postgenomic's primary purpose is to act as a central repository for reviews of scientific papers and for conference reports. You can help with this by adding some very simple semantic markup to your blog posts when you write a review of a paper. In this context a "review" isn't necessarily a particularly long or critical assessment of the paper (though it could be): it's simply any information that other researchers might find useful.

(Originally shared on the Science Library Pad, March 3, 2006)

MEMS Technology and Biomedical Applications - Conference

The Gordon Research Conference on "MEMS Technology and Biomedical Applications" will be held at Connecticut College, New London, CT during the week of June 25-30, 2006. There is an opportunity for researchers and their students to present their work at a poster session during the conference. More information about the conference, including links to registration can be found at http://www.grc.uri.edu/programs/2006/mems.htm.

Session topics include:

  • Novel BioMEMS Sensing
  • Chemical Specificity for BioMEMS Sensing
  • BioMaterials for BioMEMS
  • MEMS Technology as a Biomedical Device Platform
  • Biologically Inspired MEMS
  • Biofluidic Microsystems
  • Lab-on-a-Chip
  • Implantable MEMS Devices
  • Applications of BioMEMS in Human Health

Several Case speakers are listed, including:

  • Horst von Recum - "Activation of gene regulation by a drug delivery microchip"
  • Carlos Mastrangelo - Tentative Title: "Microfluidics chips for integrated DNA Assays"

Medical Information Day

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Tuesday, April 11, 2006, or 4-11, is "Medical Information Day". The observance recognizes the invaluable information and vast range of services medical librarians provide for their institutions and local communities.

Case is very lucky with the availability of medical information available to us through the Cleveland Health Sciences Library consisting of the Allen Memorial Medical Library and the Health Center Library.

(Thank you to ResourceShelf, April 9, 2006, for sharing this information.)

Finding Genuine Medical Information

On December 6, 2005, Knowledgespeak summarized some aspects and web sites that offer genuine medical information on the web.

Around 37 percent of Americans are estimated to browse the web looking for health information. According to ComScore Media Metrix, a US-based Net usage measurement company, between August 2004 and 2005, users scouring the web for medical information increased a significant 23 percent. With such increasing demand, the users find it difficult to obtain trustworthy information.

[About Knowledgespeak]
Knowledgespeak is the world's first online news service to report all the relevant developments within the STM publishing industry, on a daily basis. This is a free service that also offers additional resources including a blog area, calendar of events, articles, white papers and a directory of STM publishers.

The Albert Szent-Gyorgi Papers

The Scout Report in the December 2, 2005 edition shared a summary of the Albert Szent-Gyorgi Papers.

The Albert Szent-Gyorgyi Papers
are hosted by the National Library of Medicine as part of its Profiles in Science series.

Albert Imre Szent-Gyorgyi (1893-1986), a Hungarian-born biochemist, was the first to isolate vitamin C, and his research on biological oxidation provided the basis for Krebs' citric acid cycle. His discoveries about the biochemical nature of muscular contraction revolutionized the field of muscle research. His later career was devoted to research in "submolecular" biology, applying quantum physics to biological processes. He was especially interested in cancer, and was one of the first to explore the connections between free radicals and cancer. Szent-Gyorgyi won the 1937 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his work in biological oxidation and vitamin C, and the Lasker Award in Basic Medical Research in 1954, for contributions to understanding cardiovascular disease through basic muscle research.
[About Profiles in Science]
The National Library of Medicine (NLM) is making the archival collections of leaders in biomedical research and public health available on its Profiles in Science® web site. The site, launched in September 1998, promotes the use of the Internet for research and teaching in the history of biomedical science. Many of the collections have been donated to NLM and contain published and unpublished items, including books, journal volumes, pamphlets, diaries, letters, manuscripts, photographs, audiotapes, video clips, and other materials.

Advances in Nanotechnology - Links Updated

The Scout Report (Volume 11, Number 44, November 4, 2005) has put together a collection of various nanotechnology web sites.

Interactive Concepts in Biochemistry

The Scout Report (June 24, 2005, Volume 4, Number 13) showcased Interactive Concepts in Biochemistry.

While Interactive Concepts in Biochemistry is a companion website to Dr. Rodney Boyer's Concepts in Biochemistry (2nd edition), which CASE does not own, it is still a nice multimedia web site for instruction in biochemistry.

In addition to sections that correspond to each of the book's chapters, the web site offers many opportunities for learning. It offers Concept Reviews with quizzes for elementary kinetics, logarithms, pH & buffers, Redox reactions, and thermodynamics. The web site contains various interactive animations, such as cell structure, cloning, glycolysis, or photosynthesis. Using Chemscape Chime plug-in, the web site offers interactive structure tutorials in various topics, such as DNA or kinesin. The web site also includes articles on "cutting edge" topics and various web links for further exploration.

Science and Photography Through the Microscope

From The Scout Report (Volume 11, Number 44, November 4, 2005) comes an announcement about a web site focused on microscopic images. Science and Photography Through the Microscope (a web site devoted to microscopy science education) contains images by award-winning photomicrographer Dennis Kunkel.

The Image Library contains over 1500 micrographs of scientific, biological and medical subjects photographed with light and electron microscopes. The Image Use Policy is well posted, including how educators may gain permission to use an image.

New Open Access Journal: EURASIP Journal on Signal Processing and Bioinformatics

UPDATE: Name has already changed to "EURASIP Journal on Bioinformatics and Systems Biology".

Hindawi Publishing Corporation is preparing to published a new open access journal called EURASIP Journal on Signal Processing and Bioinformatics.

[Aims & Scope]

The overall aim of EURASIP JSPB is to publish research results related to signal processing and bioinformatics theories and techniques relevant to a wide area of applications into the core new disciplines of genomics, proteomics, and systems biology. The journal is intended to offer a common platform for scientists from several areas including signal processing, bioinformatics, statistics, biology and medicine, who are interested in the development of algorithmic, mathematical, statistical, modeling, simulation, data mining, and computational techniques, as demanded by various applications in genomics, proteomics, system biology, and more general in health and medicine.

Supreme Court to Look at What can be Patented

The Supreme Court will hear the case of Laboratory Corp. of America (LabCorp) v. Metabolite Laboratories. The specific patent being questioned is US 4,940,658 (July 10, 1990), titled Assay for sulfhydryl amino acids and methods for detecting and distinguishing cobalamin and folic acid deficency.

Method for determining levels of sulfhydryl amino acids, particularly total homocysteine levels in samples of body tissue from warm-blooded animals, methods of detecting cobalamin and folic acid deficiency using an assay for total homocysteine levels, and methods for distinguishing cobalamin from folic acid deficiency using an assay for total homocysteine levels in conjunction with an assay for methylmalonic acid.

Depending on how the Supreme Court resolves this case, it may have substantial implications for the patentability of business methods and even of software. See this blog for more information and a legal perspective of what could happen.

Journal of International Medical Research - Open Access Journal Title

Thanks to George S. Porter on the CHMINF-L listserv for sharing this announcement on this new open access journal. Journal of International Medical Research provides articles free on the Internet, because it operates under a page sponsorship fee system.

[About Journal of International Medical Research]

Founded in 1972, The Journal of International Medical Research has established itself as a leading journal for rapid publication of original medical, pre-clinical and clinical research.

Clinical and pre-clinical studies are welcomed as are reviews, case reports, preliminary communications and studies on new indications or new formulations of established products. Post-marketing surveillance, pharmacoeconomic and managed care studies are also invited.

Journal supplements for symposium proceedings, summaries of presentations or collections of medical, pre-clinical or clinical data on a specific topic are published and enquiries from potential sponsors of these are welcome.

All medical areas will be considered for publication including animal pharmacology, clinical pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, drug metabolism, toxicology, teratology and clinical trials.

Thomson Scientific Laureates

Thomson Scientific, based on total citation counts from its ISI Web of Knowledge product, has predicted the 2005 Nobel Prize winners in chemistry, economics, physiology or medicine, and physics.

(Originally posted by Bob Michaelson on the STS-L listserv.)

Origin of BLAST and the Explosion of Bioinformatics

The Scientist (v.19:16, p.21, August 29, 2005) has an article about the history of BLAST and how the code allows scientists to compare a gene sequence against GenBank. Some of the off-the-chart numbers include GenBank had over 40 million sequences at the end of 2004, and that the National Center for Biotechnology Information commits 158 two-processor computers to gene sequence queries.

Environmental Health & Safety Research on Nanoparticles

As reported in the August 31, 2005, Knowledgespeak Newsletter, the Center for Biological and Environmental Nanotechnology (CBEN) of Rice University and the International Council on Nanotechnology (ICON) have released a free online database covering scientific findings related to the risks and benefits of nanotechnology. The environmental health and safety (EHS) resource, the first of its kind in the world, aims to combine vast amounts of scientific content on the effects of nanoparticles.



[CBEN Vision]
This Center aims to shape nanoscience into a discipline with the relevance, triumphs, and vitality of a modern day polymer science. Both fields have at their core a complex class of materials, are highly interdisciplinary enterprises, and have enormous potential for spawning technology. Unlike polymer science, however, nanoscience is in its infancy, and its maturation into a discipline to rival polymer science is unlikely to happen spontaneously. The Center for Biological and Environmental Nanotechnology fosters the development of this field through an integrated set of programs that aim to address the scientific, technological, environmental, human resource, commercialization, and societal barriers that hinder the transition from nanoscience to nanotechnology.

[ICON Mission Statement]

ICON’s mission is to assess, communicate, and reduce nanotechnology environmental and health risks while maximizing its societal benefit.

Author-Driven Access to ACS Published Articles

The American Chemical Society (ACS) has several partial open access initiatives. First, ACS will submit articles to PubMed Central that were funded by National Institutes of Health (NIH) funds. Second, authors can provide links to their articles. During the first 12 months, 50 free e-prints will be available through the author's web links. After 12 months, the restriction will be listed.

For more detailed information, see Frequently Asked Questions Regarding ACS Author-driven Initiatives.

Continue reading "Author-Driven Access to ACS Published Articles"

PubMed offers RSS

Library Stuff by Steven M. Cohen shared some great screen shots and instructions for converting a PubMed search into a RSS feed.

PubMed was designed to provide access to citations from biomedical literature.

New Open Access Journal: Globalization and Health

Title: Globalization and Health
Editor-in-chief: Greg Martin, Derek Yach
Abbreviation: Global Health
ISSN: 1744-8603
URL: http://www.globalizationandhealth.com/home

Globalization and Health is an Open Access, peer-reviewed, online journal that provides a platform for research, knowledge sharing and debate on the topic of globalization and its effects on health, both positive and negative. 'Globalization' essentially refers to anything 'supra-territorial', anything that transcends the geopolitical boundaries of the nation-state. As a process it is being driven by liberalisation of markets and technological advancements. In essence, it is about human proximity - people are now living in each other's metaphorical pockets. More about...

BioMed Central has been a leader in scientific publishing using an open access model.

More BioMed Central open access journals can be found in the OhioLINK Library Catalog by searching for "biomed central", or by proceeding directly to the BioMed Central web site.