Entries in "RSS & Readers" ( for this category only)

For the Case Community - Understanding RSS Feeds

Do you know what a RSS feed is or how to use them to make information consumption easier? Consider participating in the CaseLearns class called Understanding RSS Feeds on Monday, October 8th, at 3pm in the Kelvin Smith Library. You must register at http://library.case.edu/caselearns/.

Sign Up for IEEE Standards Alerts via Email or RSS

IEEE Xplore now features opt-in standards alerts to keep you up-to-date on standards revisions available through email or RSS. This free service has recently been expanded to enable any IEEE Xplore user to be notified whenever a new standard or draft is published or a standard is revised. Users have the option to sign up for standards alerts based on industry or version number. To sign up, visit: ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpl/tocalerts_signup.jsp

[VIA: What's New @ IEEE for Libraries, March 2007, Volume 8, Number 3]

Continue reading "Sign Up for IEEE Standards Alerts via Email or RSS"

More on New Workshop

As I mentioned before, I am teaching a new workshop for the Kent State University School of Library & Information Science.

I have used a couple of the existing web 2.0 tools to share my workshop content. Check out the Squidoo page to see what readings and tools we used. On SlideShare, I posted the introductory slides I used before we moved on to our hands-on assignments.

New Workshop - Using Web 2.0 Principles to Become Librarian 2.0

I am getting ready to teach a new workshop at Kent State University School of Library & Information Science. The response for the first offering was amazing - 24 at the Main campus and another 9 at Ohio State (distance location of the Kent program). I am really looking for the chance for a large group to "play" with all these tools.

Students will discover how libraries are using Web 2.0 tools, such as blogs, RSS feeds, wikis, social communities, podcasts, and various mash-ups, to give library users increased ownership in their library interactions. Students will investigate the major principles and applications, while developing an understanding of the library-specific issues. Topics of discussion may include privacy, trust or abuse of these technologies, policy considerations, factors to implementation, and optimization in the library environment. In addition, students will look at how users are creating tools to supplement and/or replace their experience with libraries.
Check out the Squidoo page I set up for the workshop. If you have any suggestions or feedback, please share.

The students for their final project will practice by using blogs, wikis, or other tools to create a web 2.0 environment for one of three scenarios - an existing or fictional library, employee training, or a virtual environment for a specific class or employer project. They will have a chance to keep it private on a library school run server or use one of the many free web-based applications. I am giving them the choice. If any of them decide to go public, I will share the results here.

User Annotation of Videos - Very Web 2.0

The other day I posted a YouTube video called Web 2.0 ... The Machine is Us/ing Us.

The author has went Web 2.0 to the extreme. If you watch the same video from a website called mojiti, you get to add you own comments.

ALA's Collection of Web 2.0 Resources

ALA has created a wiki that highlights all the online tools that have been created by ALA and its members. The Read Write Connect wiki allows a user quick access to a variety of web 2.0 tools, such as wikis, blogs, podcasts, videos, RSS feeds, social network, and virtual worlds.

What is Web 2.0?

This video demonstrates Web 2.0 in under 5 minutes.

Microsoft: RSS Usage Survey Results

Microsoft Research Asia conducted a survey about RSS feeds. Some highlights from the 1354 responses:

  • Bloglines accounted for 18% of the readers
  • Over 30% subscribe to over 100 feeds
  • Over 80% had blogs but only 44% updated them regularly
See more details from the Microsoft results site, even though they have not issued a formal analysis.

Yahoo Researchs RSS

Yahoo sponsored research shows that 31% of people on the Internet are using RSS feeds, but only 4% of the people realize it and 12% are roughly aware of RSS.

[VIA: AbsTracked: Yahoo! Says 31% of Internet Users Use RSS]

Continue reading "Yahoo Researchs RSS"

Citing Blogs with RefWorks

RefWorks allows you to enter an RSS feed into your personal collection from the "search" menu. I knew this function was available and have recommended it to people that monitor journal table of contents.

RSS4Lib pointed out
another use that I had not thought of. You can use the same function to import blog entries or other website information into RefWorks. If you have ever cited a website, you know it can be a pain. You need to know things like when was it accessed, when was it created, and the URL. RefWorks saves all that information for you. Just pick your citation format and let RefWorks do all the work.

RefWorks is available to the Case community, and the links are available at the bottom of the Research Databases page.

[VIA: RSS4Lib: Citing Blogs with Refworks]

RSS Reader Suggestions

In the past, I have suggested people try Pluck to read RSS feeds. I liked it because it had 3 access points: sidebar in Firefox, sidebar in IE, and a log-in web page. It saved my feeds and items, so I could access them from my regular computer or any system that I was using. I could store internal bookmarks of specific entries. It also cooperated with Outlook so I could email links directly to individuals that I thought would be interested.

The bad news...
The Pluck RSS Reader is being discontinued as of January 5, 2007. At that time, the server will be shutdown and unexported data will be lost.

I am now exploring new options.

I often suggest Bloglines to people that are new to RSS readers. It is very easy and free, but might lack the options for a "power user".

I am trying Rojo, which is another web-based reader. It is also free and you can try it without actually signing up.

In the past, I explored Attensa, which delivers RSS feeds directly into folders within Microsoft Outlook. That experimentation was short lived, as I already spend too much time in my email application.

Firefox and the new IE offer toolbar reading of feeds. I probably have more than 200 feeds I browse, so I do not use these tools much. I have one or two favorites that I have added to my Firefox toolbar.

I am currently using BlogBridge that is a stand alone application. Since I am often getting emails, phone calls, and in-person visits to help people with using our library's resources, I prefer the stand alone application. It allows me to open Firefox or IE quickly to help a library user, without potentially losing what I was working on.

CaseLearns Workshop - Understanding RSS Feeds

CaseLearns Workshop - Understanding RSS Feeds
September 28, 2006, 11:30am-12:30pm
Kelvin Smith Library (KSL) 215
Registration required at: http://library.case.edu/caselearns/

Learn about RSS and how it has changed the information world. We will explore what options are available to access RSS feeds (readers or aggregators), how KSL and CASE are using RSS feeds, and look at various RSS feeds and other resources available for free on the Internet or within our Library databases.

This course is NOT technical in nature, and will not explore the creation of RSS feeds or blogs. Blogs are not covered by this session, since they are not the same as RSS feeds, as some people mistakenly think. If you can surf the Internet, you are prepared to participate in the class and utilize RSS feeds in your daily life.

If you use RSS already, please share this with your colleagues that do not enjoy the benefits of RSS delivery of information.

Contact me if you have questions:
Brian C. Gray, MLIS
Librarian - Engineering, Math, & Statistics
Email: brian.c.gray@case.edu
Blog: http://blog.case.edu/bcg8/
Engineering Reading Room: http://library.case.edu/ksl/engineering/

Phone: (216) 368-8685

Movable Type Owner Acquires Rojo Networks

September 9, 2006 - Six Apart the company that developed and supports Movable Type, which is Case's blogging platform, has announced they have acquired Rojo Networks. Rojo runs a web-based RSS feed reader. Maybe Case will end up with a recommended feed reader as a companion to the blog system?

See the full Six Apart - Press.

Chemistry World News by RSS Feed

Chemistry World's daily news service is now available as a RSS feed, joining the existing feeds for RSC Journals.

Chemistry World is packed with articles on all aspects of the chemical sciences, regular company and individual profiles, job vacancies, commercial technology reports and many fascinating features.

(VIA: SD Librarian, July 28, 2006)

Understanding RSS Feeds

CaseLearns Workshop: Understanding RSS Feeds
June 14, 2006, 1:00 PM
Instructor: Brian C. Gray

View the full presentation from the June 14, 2006, Understanding RSS Feeds workshop.

Continue reading "Understanding RSS Feeds"

Public Commenting on Organizational Blogs or Websites

I have been participating in a virtual workshop designed by the American Library Association (ALA) to instruct in and establish best practices in utilizing Web 2.0 technologies. ALA Library 2.0 included many components from blogging, wikis, RSS feeds, etc. My personal ALA Library 2.0 blog also includes various details and links.

One part of the virtual workshop included an interview I conducted with some of the Kelvin Smith Library Freedman Center staff.

My group just completed our final project. We explored the best practices in allowing public comments on formal organizational blogs or websites.

Here is an alternative link to the presention.

UPDATE: The ALA blogs mentioned above have since been taken down. Any entries that I was involved in were moved to this blog and the links fixed.

CaseLearns Workshop - Understanding RSS Feeds

CaseLearns Workshop - Understanding RSS Feeds
June 14, 2005, 1pm-2pm
Kelvin Smith Library (KSL) 215
Registration required at: http://library.case.edu/caselearns/

Learn about RSS and how it has changed the information world. We will explore what options are available to access RSS feeds (readers or aggregators), how KSL and CASE are using RSS feeds, and look at various RSS feeds and other resources available for free on the Internet or within our Library databases.

This course is NOT technical in nature, and will not explore the creation of RSS feeds or blogs. Blogs are not covered by this session, since they are not the same as RSS feeds, as some people mistakenly think. If you can surf the Internet, you are prepared to participate in the class and utilize RSS feeds in your daily life.

If you use RSS already, please share this with your colleagues that do not enjoy the benefits of RSS delivery of information.

Contact me if you have questions:
Brian C. Gray, MLIS
Librarian - Engineering, Math, & Statistics
Email: brian.c.gray@case.edu
Blog: http://blog.case.edu/bcg8/
Engineering Reading Room: http://library.case.edu/ksl/engineering/
Phone: (216) 368-8685

How Today's Web Has Changed Technical Writing

The IEEE Professional Communication Society Newsletter (IEEE PCS, Volume 50, Number 5, May 2006) has two articles that address web development and how technical writers must adapt to "web 2.0" technologies and users.

Web Development…How Do You Define Web Development?
by Elizabeth Weise Moeller

The problem is that “web development” is such a broad term, unlike so long ago when the web was first getting started. In the end, I decided to talk about the past, the present, the future, and, in the process, highlight some trends you can watch to help keep visitors returning to your website.
What is Web 2.0 and How Will Technical Writers be Impacted?
by Amy Diehl
Web 2.0 is a movement away from understanding content as housed in websites, but instead views content as “granular.” In this way, the content can be syndicated and distributed in decentralized ways and without relying on the user visiting a site or page in order to find the information or content. With the advent of Web 2.0, or the web as platform, not place, technical writers and designers will need to rethink many of their strategies regarding how their writing works in relation to “place”.

Top 10 Sources

Top 10 Sources is a directory of sites developed to highlight the most relevant content on the Web as distributed by RSS feeds. The editors of Top 10 Sources search blogs, podcasts, wikis, news sites, and every kind of syndicated sources online for the best material. The lists are updated frequently and organized my subject categories. Several categories exist in science and technology, such as science news, controversial science, and thinkers of the web.

(Via: Librarian In Black, April 9, 2006)

They Are Blogging At Blackboard

Educate Innovate is the Blackboard blog about the convergence of education and technology.

They aim to use this forum to generate discussion about the topics, news, and latest trends impacting e-Learning and campus service offerings; and hope to provide insight about how technology can enable educational innovations for both.

They invite people to visit frequently to hear from their blogging team, guest bloggers, Q&A interviews with education industry thought leaders, movers and shakers, the people who work at Blackboard, and just plain interesting, cool people.

(Via: The Kept-Up Academic Librarian, February 23, 2006)

Me & Web 2.0

I guess this is an extension of my earlier introduction.

Since I am sure we are all at different levels of technology usage and knowledge, I thought I would post about my technology usage.

I am high on anything that will increase my productivity while supporting mobility. I have two offices on my campus, one in the main library and one in the School of Engineering, and I also drive about 80 miles per day. At work, I rely solely on a laptop. As our campus is totally wireless and I have docking stations in both offices, I can basically work from anywhere that is needed. I will often travel to faculty offices or student study areas to assist or instruction in research, and I can conveniently take my "whole" office with me. I also use a Dell Axim X50v handheld that supports wireless access, email, video, various applications, etc. I can throw it in my pocket and access the library catalog from within the stacks, listen to music while wlaking across campus, or access an urgent email to share with others during a meeting. I love my Axim.

My university supports both a blog system and wiki. I do maintain a work-related weblog (e3 Information Overload, E-resources for Engineering Education) that highlights resources or issues relevant to science and engineering faculty and students. I also add content to other library blogs within my organization, a Reference Weblog and general library news Weblog. The library offers various RSS feeds. I do not participate as much in the wiki, as I have not learned the editing structure yet and it is not straight forward from a user perspective.

I use Pluck to read RSS feeds as it offers the ability to go back and forth from an application on my computer to web-based access as needed. I look forward to seeing how BlogBridge compares. I am also experimenting with Attensa as it work with Microsoft Office.

BioMed Central Journals Have RSS Feeds

BioMed Central offers RSS feeds for each of their journals.

[What is BioMed Central?]

BioMed Central is an independent publishing house committed to providing immediate open access to peer-reviewed biomedical research. Read more here...

New York Times - Science & Technology RSS Feeds

New York Times offers various RSS feeds. You may want to check out the Science RSS or Technology RSS feeds.

American Chemical Society Journals - RSS Feeds

Each of the American Chemical Society journals offer RSS feeds that include their Articles ASAP and complete Table of Contents.

Track Biomedical Papers Being Discussed by Bloggers

Postgenomic collates posts from life science blogs and then does useful and interesting things with that data. For example, you can see which papers are currently being discussed by neurologists, or which web pages are being linked to by bioinformaticians. It's sort of like a hot papers meeting with the entire biomed blogging community.

A RSS feed is available to track the "Posts of the day", "Current hot stories", or "Current hot papers".

[About Postgenomic]

Postgenomic aggregates posts from life science blogs and then does useful and interesting things with that data.

For example, it allows you to get an instant picture of which web sites are being heavily linked to by researchers in the medical sciences, or which papers are being cited or reviewed most often by bioinformaticians, or which buzzwords are being used the most frequently by evolutionary biologists.

It's sort of like a hot papers meeting with the entire biomed blogging community.

Sort of.

Postgenomic's primary purpose is to act as a central repository for reviews of scientific papers and for conference reports. You can help with this by adding some very simple semantic markup to your blog posts when you write a review of a paper. In this context a "review" isn't necessarily a particularly long or critical assessment of the paper (though it could be): it's simply any information that other researchers might find useful.

(Originally shared on the Science Library Pad, March 3, 2006)

Science Magazine Offers RSS Feed

Science Magazine offers several RSS Feeds, including table of contents, "this week in Science", podcasts, and ScienceCareers.

Web 2.0 Mashup Matrix

If you are looking to develop some new web applications or are looking to take advantage of some current mashups, you have to check out the Web 2.0 Mashup Matrix or the Web 2.0 Mashup Center (database) on Programmable Web.

(Originally shared on Snarkmarket, March 24, 2006)

Podcasts - Current State Of

On Designtechnica Talk Backs (March 23, 2006), Colin Dixon and Michael Greeson looked at the current status of podcasting.

First, they established a standard definition of podcasting:

  • file-based (download not streaming),
  • subscription-based and "pushed" to user,
  • & consumed on portable devices.
They further discussed the results of a survey that demonstrated that 80% of podcast downloads were never transferred to a portable device. Was the definition established with too tight of parameters or is podcasting not as hot as everyone wants us to believe?

Personally, I find myself downloading and listening to more and more podcasts, but I have yet to use a portable device. I find it more convenient to use my laptop for listening to podcasts, and I listen to music on my portable device while walking, running, or driving.

New Scientist Offers RSS Feeds

The New Scientist offers various RSS feeds, including breaking news, subject-specific, and special reports.

For the Case community, the New Scientist is available in the Kelvin Smith Library or electronically from various sources.

HigherEdBlogCon

HigherEdBlogCon 2006

From April 3-28, 2006, make sure you participate in the HigherEd BlogCon. This brand-new, all-online event aims to bring together in a single Web space many of the leading players who are transforming academe with their use of the new tools of the Social Web. Higher Ed BlogCon 2006 will focus on the use of blogs, wikis, RSS, audio and video podcasts, and other digital tools in a range of areas in academe.

The program tracks appear to have something for everyone interested in using today's newest tools in education:

  • Teaching - April 3-7, 2006
  • Library & info resources - April 10-14, 2006
  • Admissions, alumni relations, and communications & marketing - April 17-21, 2006
  • Websites & web development - April 24-28, 2006.

Physics Today Offers RSS Feed

Physics Today offers a RSS feed.

For the Case community, Physics Today is available in the Kelvin Smith Library for your pleasure and research. Various points of electronic access can also be located from Case's E-Journal Portal.

American Physical Society Offers RSS Feeds

The American Physical Society offers RSS feeds highlighting new articles in its many journals. The APS journals include Physical Review (A-E), Physical Review Letters, and Review of Modern Physics.

University Channel - Public Affairs Lectures

The University Channel is a collection of public affairs lectures, panels and events from academic institutions all over the world. A science category does exist and contains materials like stem cell research, nanotechnology, and global warming. The site does offer RSS and podcast feeds to stay current of new content.

[About University Channel]

The University Channel makes videos of academic lectures and events from all over the world available to the public. It is a place where academics can air their ideas and present research in a full-length, uncut format. Contributors with greater video production capabilities can submit original productions. (Read more...)

Stay Politically Aware with White House RSS Feeds & Podcasts

The White House and George W. Bush offers various RSS feeds and podcasts, such as press briefings, the Presidential weekly radio address, and Presidential speeches.

Blogs, Wikis, & Podcasts for Beginners

Aaron Shaffer, who works in the Freedman Center of the Kelvin Smith Library, recently gave a talk on blogs, wikis, and podcasts. Even more exciting is that you can view the podcast of the presentation. It was very professionally done and I enjoyed the format.

College and University Feed Directory

Peterson's maintains a College and University Feed Directory of RSS and Atom feeds related to higher education. Some of the categories include libraries, podcasts, research centers, students, and technology.

[About Peterson's]

Since 1966, Peterson's has helped to connect individuals, educational institutions, and corporations through its critically acclaimed books, Web sites, online products, and admissions services. Peterson's reaches an estimated 105 million consumers annually with information about colleges and universities, career schools, graduate programs, distance learning, executive training, private secondary schools, summer opportunities, study abroad, financial aid, test preparation, and career exploration. (See more...)

arXiv.org e-Print Archive

Hosted by Cornell University, arXiv.org is an e-print service in the fields of physics, mathematics, non-linear science, computer science, and quantitative biology. As of February 27, 2006, it contained over 350,000 e-prints. The major subject categories are broken down into more specific subjects that allow the user to find papers of relevance to their research. Abstracts can be viewed in html and the full papers are available in PDF. RSS feeds are available for individual archives and categories.

CAS Introduces RSS Feed

Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) has introduced a RSS feed for news and updates.

[About the RSS Feed from CAS]

The RSS (Really Simple Syndication) feed from CAS is based on the RSS 2.0 specification. RSS is a standard for syndicating updated content from a web site.

This will initially be just a single feed that will encompass all news and updates from CAS. Additional or specific topic feeds might be offered in the future depending on feedback and user demand.

Understanding RSS Feeds

CaseLearns Workshop: Understanding RSS Feeds
February 9, 2006, 11:30 AM
Instructor: Brian C. Gray
(The following entry is one of several entries I will be using to demonstrate RSS feeds in a CaseLearns workshop I am conducting in the Kelvin Smith Library.)

View the full presentation from the February 9, 2006, Understanding RSS Feeds workshop.

Continue reading "Understanding RSS Feeds"

Understanding RSS Feeds

CaseLearns Workshop: Understanding RSS Feeds
February 9, 2006, 11:30 AM
Instructor: Brian C. Gray
(The following entry is one of several entries I will be using to demonstrate RSS feeds in a CaseLearns workshop I am conducting in the Kelvin Smith Library.)

What is RSS?

  • RSS = Really Simple Syndication, Rich Site Summary, or RDF Site Summary
  • User-initiated subscriptions that provide updates, news headlines, or other content directly to the user for browsing at their convenience.
  • XML-based format for sharing and distributing Web content.
  • On the web, it can be recognized by various terminology: XML, ATOM, RSS feed, RSS channel, RSS steam, syndicated feed, & webfeed.
  • Several versions have been created and are used: RSS 0.9, RSS 1.0, RSS 2.0, Atom.
Examples of logos to watch for:


RSS.jpg
atom feed.bmp
xml feed.bmp
rss 2.png
RSS logo.jpg

Continue reading "Understanding RSS Feeds"

CaseLearns Workshop - Understanding RSS Feeds

CaseLearns Workshop - Understanding RSS Feeds
February 9, 2005, 11:30am-12:30p
Kelvin Smith Library (KSL) 215
Registration required at: http://library.case.edu/caselearns/

Learn about RSS and how it has changed the information world. We will explore what options are available to access RSS feeds (readers or aggregators), how KSL and CASE are using RSS feeds, and look at various RSS feeds and other resources available for free on the Internet or within our Library databases.

This course is NOT technical in nature, and will not explore the creation of RSS feeds or blogs. Blogs are not covered by this session, since they are not the same as RSS feeds, as some people mistakenly think. If you can surf the Internet, you are prepared to participate in the class and utilize RSS feeds in your daily life.

If you use RSS already, please share this with your colleagues that do not enjoy the benefits of RSS delivery of information.

Contact me if you have questions:
Brian C. Gray, MLIS
Librarian - Engineering, Math, & Statistics
Email: brian.c.gray@case.edu
Blog: http://blog.case.edu/bcg8/
Engineering Reading Room: http://library.case.edu/ksl/engineering/
Phone: (216) 368-8685

Observations on Blogging

I subscribe to Planet Case, Blog@Case Comments, and various RSS feeds from Case blogs and other blogs from several subject areas (library & information science, technology, engineering, etc). I am surprised by some of the activities I have seen on some blogs.

  • Copying word for word materials written by others, which would be a violation of copyright
  • Copying all or a portion of a material written by others without citing the original source
  • Posting an item, allowing extensive discussion to occur in the comments section, and than changing the original post so the commentators look like idiots
  • Allowing commenting to occur, than deleting comments you do not agree with
  • Not linking to the source that you are commenting about, so others can form their own opinions
  • On and on...
Many bloggers probably do not think of actions like this, because it is so easy to cut-and-paste or press a delete button. Actions like this happen on web sites all of the time, but unless cached by Google, the WayBack Machine, or other services it might not be visible to the casual reader. Email holds more accountabilty, because once you send an item you cannot recall it. The blogosphere falls in between these two realms. Changes, deletions, updates, etc. on blogs probably go unnoticed all the time, unless the blog owner makes a statement in their entry. RSS feeds though increase the level of accountabilty of blogs. Once a subscriber receives a RSS item in their reader or aggregator, it is no longer in control of the original blog owner. If someone follows a certain blog closely, especially by utilization of RSS, the writer's habits, changes, or style of writing now have gained a history outside of the blog owner's control.

I like the Bloggers' Code of Ethics that was created by CyberJournalist.net. And in a related note, CyberJournalist shared the New York Times view on blogging.

Podcasting Gaining Interest

Back in April of 2005, the Pew Internet & American Life Project issued a data memo showing that podcasting is catching on.

A few key findings include:

  • More than 22 million American adults own iPods or MP3 players, and about 1 out of 3 of those have downloaded a podcast.
  • Of the iPod/MP3 owners from 18-28, half have downloaded podcasts.
See the full report for more figures and survey results. Some additional commentary is also available in response to several publications that questioned the data attained.

I guess this report shows very strong justification for the Freedman Center to continue creating and educating users in podcasting, since college age users of iPods/MP3 players are embracing podcasts.

E-Mail Is So Five Minutes Ago

Evidence that demonstrates that email usage will decrease as collaboration becomes the key for success is presented in a November 28th, 2005, Business Week article, called E-Mail Is So Five Minutes Ago. It gives some examples of business usage of wikis, blogs, instant messaging, RSS, and groupware.

I particularly enjoyed some of the words or thoughts introduced, such as "e-waste" for all that junk email and email CC meaning "cover your ass".

Of great concern was the statistic that next year only 8% of all emails will be legitimate. I think this will just further drive alternative technologies such as RSS even harder into everyday usage.

RSS Still Not Widely Adopted

On October 12, 2005, Chris Sherman on SearchEngineWatch reported that RSS usage was still not widely adopted. His article summarized and provided commmentary on several studies. Some of the results, included:

  • Only 12% of all users know about RSS
  • Only 4% knowingly use it to read web content
  • 27% of users utilize RSS on personalized start pages without realizing that RSS drives the content
See the full article for more numbers related to who and how people are using RSS feeds.

Blogging in Academia - Benefit or Risk to Your Job

From the It's All Good blog came a posting about an article in Slate called Attack of the Career-Killing Blogs - When Academics Post Online, Do they Risk Their Jobs? by Robert S. Boynton on November 16, 2005. The article highlights the various opinions on academic blogs, such as increasing Internet-awareness of a professor or university, increasing dialogue, lack of seriousness, harming an institution, and improving or harming a professor's chance for tenure.

An older article that might also be of interest, called Bloggers Need Not Apply by Ivan Tribble, appeared on July 8, 2005, in the Chronicle of Higher Education.

Universities Are Warming Up to Wikis

I am catching up on my reading, and I see that Jeremy Smith shared how the Case Wiki is gaining attention.

IEEE Xplore now offers RSS feeds

IEEE Xplore digital library has added RSS feeds for new issues of all IEEE journals. Feeds are available individually from each journal's main page in IEEE Xplore. To see one example, visit the Proceedings of the IEEE main page.

RSS feeds can also be found through the Table of Contents Alerts service, which continues to offer notification by email.



IEEE Xplore is available to the Case community and includes access to an amazing collection of IEEE materials directly to your computer.

Engineering Reading Room & Office Hours - RSS Feed

For the Case community, I will be posting announcements and my office hours on my blog.

See the Engineering Reading Room web site for updates as they occur. You may also subscribe to a RSS feed that contains only information related to the Engineering Reading Room.

*Hours subject to change so watch web site or RSS feed .
*Appointments available for other times, see web site for contact information.



Engineering Reading Room (Nord Hall 508)
  • Open 24x7
  • Includes computer for searching library resources
  • Journals have just started to arrive, so watch for updates
  • Confortable furniture available on 5th floor of Nord Hall

RSS Feeds for Each Category

I spend a lot of times organizing my entries into categories, so that the audience I support can focus their reading if they prefer. In order to give my audience more control, I now offer a RSS feed for each individual category for your viewing pleasure. Just visit my category index page to give it a try.

My code was developed from the example at the girlie matters blog.

See how I accomplished the feeds on my Case blog at the Case Wiki.

Knovel Adds RSS Feeds

From the October 19, 2005, Knovel K-News:

Knovel has RSS-enabled many pages in the Knovel Library Web site, which means users can add a "feed" for a given page to their Newsreader and keep track of changes made to that page. For example, the RSS feed for the "All Titles" Web page will update when a new title has been added. Or the RSS feed for a particular Subject Area page will automatically update when new titles have been added to that area. Subscribers can conveniently add a feed to monitor "My Subscription" to know when new titles are added to their subscription.

To start using Knovel's RSS feeds, go to a page you want to monitor and click the orange RSS button on the right of the screen. Copy and paste the URL from the address bar into your Newsreader. That's it! Simply monitor your Newsreader periodically to see the new additions and changes.

CASE's subscription can be accessed directly from www.knovel.com or the research database list.

PubMed offers RSS

Library Stuff by Steven M. Cohen shared some great screen shots and instructions for converting a PubMed search into a RSS feed.

PubMed was designed to provide access to citations from biomedical literature.

Guide to RSS & Webfeeds

The Rowland Institute Library Blog (rihlib News) shared a link to a wonderful resource that introduces RSS and webfeeds.

RSS & Webfeeds: A Field Guide for Librarians provides definitions, examples of current uses, and several glimpses into how content providers will be incorporating the technology. The presentation was created by Teri Vogel of University of California, San Diego.

Institute of Physics offers RSS feeds

The Institute of Physics (IOP) offers several RSS feeds, including event postings, job postings, several regular features, recent news, and product information. In addition, a large selection of journal titles and recent article publications may be monitored by RSS feed.

The Institute of Physics (IOP) is the leading international professional body promoting physics research. [About the Institute of Physics]