Entries in "Scientific Publishing & Data" ( for this category only)

Major Chemistry Publisher Apparently Phasing Out Print Journals

It appears from an article in Nature (Published online 17 June 2009) that the American Chemical Society has announces steps to phase out their print journals in favor of all electronic access.

I wondered what major publisher would be first to take this action.

Sticker Shock - Take 2

Do you know how much journals cost, especially in science and engineering?

Cornell University Library uses real world purchases to show you how much libraries invest in your education and research needs. Check out Sticker Shock 2 for more information. I am scared when they compare journals to cars and international trips.

The original Sticker Shock was completed in 2002.

Mathematical Biology Now Covered by Biology Direct

Biology Direct considers original research articles, hypotheses, comments, discovery notes and reviews in selected subject areas, and will eventually cover the full spectrum of biology. Subject areas already launched include Genomics, Bioinformatics and Systems Biology, Immunology, and Mathematical Biology.

Andrei Yakovlev wrote an editorial that kicked off the new commitment to Mathematical Biology.

Modern mathematics offers a much richer arsenal of tools and ideas than those that are frequently employed to describe the enormous diversity of biological phenomena.

MathSciJournalWiki

MathSciJournalWiki is a freely-editable resource for information on scholarly journals, especially in mathematics. It aims to be a central resource for understanding the journal system, both in its academic and economic aspects.

It lists the price history and numbers of pages for many of the journals used in mathematics and physics. It also highlights various news in the math and science publishing industry.

K-Theory Editorial Board Resigns

The Not Even Blog reported that the entire editorial board of K-Theory (Springer) has resigned and in 2008 will be publishing a new journal called Journal of K-Theory (Cambridge University Press) at about half the subscription cost.

SAE Publications Board to Review Digital Rights Management Controls for Education

SAE International’s Publications Board temporarily will suspend full activation of Digital Rights Management (DRM) controls as applied on the Society’s Digital Library of technical papers for licensees at colleges, universities and other academic institutions. See full story for more information.

Update: ICIS Creates a Students Portal - Includes Chemical Prices

ICIS has fixed the format of the chemical price list that is contained within their student portal. It formally did not view correctly in the Firefox browser, but it should work for all major browsers now.

Challenge to Society Publishers

Kimberly Douglas and Dana L. Roth, both of the California Institute of Technology, put forth a challenge for society publishers to not follow in the path of the commercial publishers. In addition, they provide some background into how librarians are "ranking" quality in tough budget times.

University faculty and administrators need to engage with librarians to ensure that the best decisions are being made for the longterm.
[VIA: Chemical & Engineering News, November 20, 2006, Volume 84, Number 47, pp.82-84]

Continue reading "Challenge to Society Publishers"

ICIS Creates Student Portal

ICIS is working on a new student portal, or "knowledge zone". Right now it links to some resources available to students. In the future, they "hope it will turn into a space in which students and academics worldwide can communicate and discuss issues with each other, and showcase their best work to the wider world, not least potential employers."

Several librarians have contacted and discussed the lack of chemical prices for student projects with ICIS. In the past, I documented and shared my concerns directly with ICIS. Randy Reichardt has taken similar steps. He has personally been involved in the recent developments.

ICIS with the announcement of this new student portal has helped to fill this need for chemical prices. ICIS now provides "you with historical chemical prices. Note that these prices are a guide only, and must not be used to guide real-time business."

I understand chemical prices are hard to locate and maintain, even for a major chemical publisher, so this historical resource fills a major need for chemical engineering students.

Thank you ICIS and Randy Reichardt!

Continue reading "ICIS Creates Student Portal"

UK PubMed Central Launched

The British Library Press Release
UK PubMed Central Launched
9 January, 2007

From today scientists will be able to access a vast collection of biomedical research and to submit their own published results for inclusion in a new online resource. Based on a model currently used by the US National Institute of Health, UK PubMed Central (UKPMC) will provide free access to a permanent online archive of peer-reviewed research papers in the medical and life sciences. See: www.ukpmc.ac.uk.

See also PubMed Central (PMC), the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) free digital archive of biomedical and life sciences journal literature.

Larry Page to Scientists

CNet News.com shares a image of Larry Page, co-founder of Google, speaking to the scientists at the Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). CNET reported that Page told the scientists to "market them (scientific studies) better and make them readily accessible to the world".

Go-Geo

Go-Geo! is a tool designed to help you find details about geo-spatial datasets and related resources within Great Britain tertiary education and beyond.

[About Go-Geo!]

Go-Geo! is an online resource discovery tool which allows for the identification and retrieval of records describing the content, quality, condition and other characteristics of geospatial data that exist with UK tertiary education and beyond. The portal supports geospatial searching by interactive map, grid co-ordinates and place name, as well as the more traditional topic or keyword forms of searching. The portal is a key component of the UK academic Spatial Data Infrastructure.

Go-Geo! has been a cooperative effort between EDINA National Data Centre, University of Edinburgh, and the UK Data Archive, University of Essex.

Topology - Entire Editorial Board Resigns

Several sources, such as the ACRLog, have announced that all the members of the editorial board of the mathematics journal Topology have resigned due to the pricing policy of its publisher Elsevier.

We have heard other reports like this over the last few years, and may see more actions like this in the future as journal prices climb quicker than the money available for their purchase.

Case has access to Topology through the OhioLINK Electronic Journal Center.

Science Commons

Science Commons, a project of the non-profit Creative Commons, is the sponsor and organizer of the Commons of Science Conference. Our goal is to promote innovation in science by lowering the legal and technical costs of the sharing and reuse of scientific work. We remove unnecessary obstacles to scientific collaboration by creating voluntary legal regimes for research and development.

The Conference is an invitation-only gathering of scientists, policy makers, and commons advocates who are actively interested in designing ways to make access to scientific data more widely available and more transparent a cross all scientific disciplines. Anyone is welcome to read the Background information, Vision Papers, or browse the list of Conference participants.

At the conclusion of the conference, audio recordings of the Conference presentations as well as presentation slides will be available on the Program page, and any recommendations arrived at during the Conference will also be posted on this site.


Science Commons serves the advancement of science by removing unnecessary legal and technical barriers to scientific collaboration and innovation.

Built on the promise of Open Access to scholarly literature and data, Science Commons identifies and eases key barriers to the movement of information, tools and data through the scientific research cycle.

Our long term vision is to provide more than just useful contracts. We will combine our publishing, data, and licensing approaches to develop solutions for a truly integrated and streamlined research process.

Continue reading "Science Commons"

BMC - Summary of Biomedical Funding Agency Policies on Open Access

BioMed Central has compiled a summary of the open access policies of different biomedical funders, linking to official policy statements from those funders where available.

CALL FOR PAPERS - Advanced Mining & Use of Life Science Information

CALL FOR PAPERS - Advanced mining and use of life science information, ACS Chicago, March 2007

You are invited to submit abstracts for a session entitled "Advanced mining and use of life science information" in the division of Chemical Information (CINF), co-sponsored with the CSA Trust, at the 233rd American Chemical Society meeting in Chicago, March 25-29, 2007

We are particularly interested in papers that address the mining of large volumes and diverse sources of chemical and life science information to aid in decision making in the drug discovery process. Potential topics include (but are not limited to):

  • Development or application of data mining techniques
  • Knowledge discovery on large chemical databases such as PubChem
  • Integrating textual and structural information
  • Design of interfaces and interaction tools for complex, diverse kinds of information
  • Database querying tools and interfaces
The presentation should last about 30 minutes, including time for questions. To submit an abstract, go to http://oasys.acs.org/acs/233nm/cinf/papers/index.cgi and select the "Advanced mining and use of life science information" session. Abstracts should be submitted no later than November 17th, 2006.

If you have questions, please feel free to contact David Wild at djwild @ indiana.edu. You can find out more information about the CSA Trust at http://www.csa-trust.org/.

David Wild
Session organizer

___________________________________________

Dr. David J. Wild, djwild @ indiana.edu
Assistant Professor

Indiana University School of Informatics

ph (812) 856-1848 - fax (812) 856-1995

1900 E. 10th St. Rm. 1128, Bloomington, IN 47406

web http://www.informatics.indiana.edu/djwild

Chemistry Central Journal - New Open Access, Peer-Reviewed, Online Journal

Chemistry Central Journal (ISSN 1752-153X) is an open access, peer-reviewed, online journal recently launched by Chemistry Central. Chemistry Central, developed by the same team who created BioMed Central, the leading biomedical open access publisher, is committed to ensuring peer-reviewed chemical research is immediately and permanently available online without charge or any other barriers to access.

Chemistry Central Journal encompasses all aspects of research in chemistry, broken down into discipline-specific sections.


Chemistry Central is a new service publishing peer-reviewed open access research in chemistry from BioMed Central, the leading biomedical open access publisher. The Chemistry Central website currently features chemistry-related articles published in BioMed Central journals and independent journals utilizing BioMed Central's open access publishing services. Chemistry Central is planning to launch further chemistry-specific journals in the near future.

ICIS Chemical Business Americas - Update

I am glad to see Randy Reichardt at the University of Alberta got a little further with a response towards why the publication (Chemical Market Reporter) was drastically changed with no feedback or warning to academia. I only received a standard response from several people at ICIS that basically already told me the obvious - "we are only covering about 100 prices and focusing more on news". I made it clear to ICIS that the strength, and what made them unique to academic libraries, was that they covered such a large amount of chemical prices. The current price coverage was much weaker than they were promoting and probably of minimal value for engineering students. Chemical industry news had many publications and organizations that focused in this realm and they were leaving a niche market (chemical prices) that academia relied heavily on CMR for.

Randy Reichardt received another response from Penny Wilson, ICIS Global Editorial Director, that reaffirmed a commitment to students. I hope this statement is not just an attempt to keep current subscribers. Their past efforts have not shown that students were considered much in their decisions, or they did not truely understand their subscibers or future subscriber needs. I am hoping it is the later, and they just did not understand how much academia needed chemical prices before they dropped the prices from the print CMR, rigged together a clunky online access with no IP recognition, and finally slashed hundreds of prices from their inventory.

USPTO Bans Wikipedia

Business Week (9/4/2006 Issue 3999, p12) has reported that the United States Patent & Trademark Office (USPTO) will no longer accept Wikipedia entries as "accepted sources of information". I am wondering why the practice was allowed in the first place.

The Patent Librarian conducted his own analysis to see how much the practice was utilized.

[VIA: The Patent Librarian's Notebook, September 10, 2006]


The Case community can find various sources of the Business Week article from the E-Journal Portal.

Connecticut Legislators Are Fighting Back Against Textbook Publishers

This comes at no shock to anyone that has ever bought a textbook:

Government analysts say the price of textbooks has risen at twice the annual inflation rate since 1986.

Boston.com News has reported that Connecticut legislators are trying to fight back against textbook prices.

Legislators are considering legislation that will require publishers to inform professors of all books available on a particular subject, how long they will remain on the market and the wholesale price they charge to bookstores. It would also allow Connecticut students to purchase their books the first week, even if financial aid has not been finalized.

ICIS Chemical Business Americas - More News

Seems like ICIS Chemical Business Americas (Chemical Market Reporter) may be writing its own ending in academic libraries. Randy Reichardt has discovered that up to 75-80% of the prices that were historically tracked have been removed from the online price index.

I looked today (September 12, 2006) at the price index. Only 86 prices were listed for 51 unique compounds. Last year when we spent the EXTRA money over 500 entries were included. In addition, many of the items that are included rarely come up in a chemical engineering design project at my institution. For example, I have never helped a student look up the following items nor did I need them a couple of years ago when I worked on my own chemical engineering design projects: coconut oil (2 entries), clover leaf oil, cotton oil (2 entries), canola meal, fish oil (4 entries), etc.

I will be updating my chemical engineering research guide to include other alternative resources and tricks for students to find chemical prices, as the value of this resource may no longer be a luxury academic libraries can afford.


Timeline of events:

Chemical Market Reporter Publisher Again Shows No Respect for Academia

As you may recall previously, I worked with the publisher of Chemical Market Reporter to establish electronic access for the Case community. This came after many librarians expressed great concern to the publisher for not considering the needs of their users.

CMR was one of the few resources available for students to establish chemical prices for their many projects. The publisher switched to online-only without asking academic users what they needed the most. They tried to make things better by offering an online subscription, but many libraries were still left in the dark as they required a single password login and wanted more money. This publisher forgot that the future purchasers of CMR would be the very students they were ignoring now.

ICIS has again decided to ignore academic subscribers. They are changing CMR to another publication, but shut down operations right when many academic librarians were directing students to this resource. A "coming soon" message does not help students complete their assignments.

OAIster - Digital Collections from Hundreds of Institutions

OAIster is a project of the University of Michigan Digital Library Production Service. Their goal is to create a collection of previously difficult-to-access, academically-oriented digital resources that are easily searchable by anyone.

As of September 2, 2006, OAIster contained 8,995,140 records from 670 institutions. Users can search these records by keyword, title, author, subject, or language, while limiting by media type. Users can also browse by institution.

More Open Access Books from Caltech

Caltech has offered more open access books since my initial post. Thanks to Dana Roth (Caltech, Chemistry Librarian) for the update.

Caltech has started a depository of open access books by Caltech authors. Subjects include chemistry, economics, geological & planetary sciences, mathematics, and mechanical engineering. The books range from 1959 to 2005.

New chemistry books include:

  • Carl J. Ballhausen and Harry B. Gray, Molecular orbital theory: an introductory lecture note and reprint volume, 1965
  • Roberts, John D. and Stewart, Ross and Caserio, Marjorie C., Organic chemistry: methane to macromolecules, 1971

Rallying Behind Open Access

Rallying Behind Open Access
Inside Higher Ed, July 28, 2006

If universities pay the salaries of researchers and provide them with labs, and the federal government provides those researchers with grants for their studies, why should those same universities feel they can't afford to have access to research findings? That's part of the argument behind a push by some in Congress to make such findings widely available at no charge.

(VIA: Case Daily, July 28, 2006)

Case Supports Federal Research Public Access Act of 2006

Case has offered their support in this letter (PDF version).

UNIVERSITY SUPPORT FOR PUBLIC ACCESS ACT EXPANDS
Library groups commend twenty-three provosts for joining recent surge of support

Washington, DC – August 3, 2006 – Just one week after more than two dozen leading universities declared their strong support for the Federal Research Public Access Act of 2006 (S.2695), provosts from an additional 23 universities added their backing in a letter issued by the Greater Western Library Alliance (GWLA) and in individual correspondence. This brings the total to at least 48 universities that have gone on record as favoring the measure.

The Federal Research Public Access Act was introduced on May 2, 2006 by Senators John Cornyn (R-TX) and Joseph Lieberman (D-CT). It requires federal agencies that fund over $100 million in annual external research to make electronic manuscripts of peer-reviewed journal articles that stem from their research publicly available on the Internet. The U.S. government funds an estimated 50% of university research, making this a particularly important cause for the higher education community.

The GWLA letter reads, in part: “Access to publicly funded research facilitates the open discussion needed to accelerate research, share knowledge, improve treatment of diseases, and increase human understanding. [The Public Access Act] is a crucial step in realizing this goal…”

“With the passage of this bill, researchers across the United States will have access to the results of work supported by federal government funding, which will help advance scientific understanding at a faster rate,” said David Pershing, Senior Vice-President, Academic Affairs, University of Utah. “No longer will knowledge created using public funds be limited to the wealthiest institutions and corporations. With everyone having access to up-to-date information, I am confident we will see a higher level of scientific research and innovation. This is a remarkable opportunity for educators and students across the nation.”

Signatories of the GWLA letter include provosts and vice presidents for state and non land-grant institutions, such as the University of Washington and Rice University. Their names are added to those of another twenty-five institutions, including Harvard University and Arkansas State University, who on Friday jointly issued “An Open Letter to the Higher Education Community.”

“The time is ripe for this legislation,” added Rodney Erickson, Executive Vice President and Provost of The Pennsylvania State University, who signed the Open Letter. “Many of us in the academic community believe the process of making the findings of publicly supported research more widely available will stimulate further research and education, and that is our primary mission as universities.”

“GWLA member libraries and administrators support the Public Access Act in principle and in practice,” said Adrian Alexander, Executive Director of the Greater Western Library Alliance. “The implications for research stemming from this bill are widespread, profound, and utterly positive. We are pleased to add our voices in support.”

Heather Joseph, Executive Director of SPARC (Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resource Coalition), added, “This groundswell of commitment from the provost community is a significant indication that the Federal Research Public Access Act has strong support in the higher education community in the United States.”

The GWLA letter, available online today, is at http://www.gwla.org/provostletter.html.

The Open Letter to the Higher Education Community signed by twenty-five provosts and issued on July 28, 2006 is online at http://www.taxpayeraccess.org/frpaa/Provosts_openletter_06-JUL.pdf.

The American Association of Law Libraries, American Library Association, Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries, Association of College & Research Libraries, Association of Research Libraries, Greater Western Library Alliance, Medical Library Association, SPARC, and The Special Libraries Association encourage taxpayers and other stakeholders in the scientific process to add their support for this important legislation. Details are online at http://www.taxpayeraccess.org/frpaa/.

###

Contact:
Jennifer Heffelfinger
SPARC
jennifer@arl.org
(202) 296-2296 ext.121

Open Access Books from Caltech

Caltech has started a depository of open access books by Caltech authors. Subjects include chemistry, economics, geological & planetary sciences, mathematics, and mechanical engineering. The books range from 1959 to 2005.

As of July 23, 2006, some of the books included:

Mathematics:
Abraham, Ralph and Marsden, Jerrold E. (1987) Foundations of Mechanics, Second Edition. Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, Inc., Redwood City, CA. ISBN 080530102X

Mechanical Engineering:
Brennen, Christopher Earls (2005) Fundamentals of Multiphase Flow. Cambridge University Press. ISBN 13 978-0-521-84804-6

Brennen, Christopher Earls (1995) Cavitation and Bubble Dynamics. Oxford University Press, New York. ISBN 0195094093

Brennen, Christopher Earls (1994) Hydrodynamics of Pumps. Concepts NREC and Oxford University Press.

Housner, George W. and Hudson, Donald E. (1980) Applied Mechanics Dynamics. California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA.

Housner, George W. and Vreeland, Thad, Jr. (1965) The Analysis of Stress and Deformation. California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA.

Chemistry:
Goddard, William A., III (1986) Nature of the Chemical Bond. California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA.

Langford, Cooper H. and Gray, Harry B. (1966) Ligand Substitution Processes. W. A. Benjamin, Inc., New York.

Roberts, John D. (1961) Notes on Molecular Orbital Calculations. W. A. Benjamin.

Roberts, John D. (1961) An Introduction to the Analysis of Spin-Spin Splitting in High-Resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectra. W. A. Benjamin.

Roberts, John D. (1959) Nuclear Magnetic Resonance: applications to organic chemistry. McGraw-Hill Series in Advanced Chemistry. McGraw-Hill Book Company, Inc.

(VIA: Science Resources, May, 8, 2006)

Lost in a Sea of Science Data

Scott Carlson in The Chronicle of Higher Education (June 23, 2006) wrote an article called Lost in a Sea of Science Data. Carlson explores the current and future growth of scientific data, and the role librarians play in its organization, storage, and retrieval.

The Case community can access the full article from the E-Journal Portal. Several of the sources have a one month embargo before the article is available.

FREE ONLINE - Building a National Science Digital Library

UPDATE: If you did not participate in the live presentation, the PowerPoint and related materials are available.


EDUCAUSE Live! May 8, 2006 1:00 p.m. EDT (12:00 p.m. CDT, 11:00 a.m. MDT, 10:00 a.m. PDT); runs one hour

Your host, Steve Worona, will be joined by Dean Krafft, and the topic will be "Building a National Science Digital Library."

Since 2000, the National Science Digital Library (NSDL) Core Integration team has been creating the infrastructure for a digital library of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics resources. That library now contains more than a million resources from approximately 100 collections. In this talk, Dean Krafft will give a short historical overview of the NSDL and describe the current NSDL community and participants. He will then review the technical underpinnings of NSDL 1.0, a library built on metadata harvesting, and describe some of the challenges encountered. For the past year, the project has been working on NSDL 2.0, a new version of the library built on the Fedora repository architecture. For the last part of the talk, Krafft will describe this new library architecture and explain how it supports creating context for science resources, how it enhances the selection and use of library materials, and what these capabilities mean for the users of the NSDL.

Dean Krafft is currently a senior research associate in computer science at Cornell University, serving primarily as a researcher but also as an IT administrator. On the research side, he is the principal investigator for the National Science Digital Library (NSDL) Project (http://nsdl.org/) at Cornell. Krafft leads the effort to develop key components of the Core Integration Technology for the library and manages the team that maintains the production library services. He works with the other institutions involved in the Core Integration effort to specify, develop, and provide new digital library technologies to the more than a hundred NSF-funded projects involved in the NSDL program.

As an administrator, he serves as director of information technology for computing and information science. He helps provide oversight for the Computer Facilities Support group, represents CIS to the campus-wide IT Managers Council, and focuses on a number of issues including IT policy, software acquisition, and computer security. He received his PhD in computer science from Cornell in 1981.

ChemDB at University of California, Irvine

ChemDB is a public database of small molecules available on the Web. ChemDB is built using the digital catalogs of over a hundred vendors and other public sources and is annotated with information derived from these sources as well as from computational methods, such as predicted solubility and three-dimensional structure. It supports multiple molecular formats and is periodically updated, automatically whenever possible. The current version of the database contains approximately 4.1 million commercially available compounds and 8.2 million counting isomers. The database includes a user-friendly graphical interface, chemical reactions capabilities, as well as unique search capabilities.

Additional information:
ChemDB: a public database of small molecules and related chemoinformatics resources
Jonathan Chen, S. Joshua Swamidass, Yimeng Dou, Jocelyne Bruand, and Pierre Baldi
Bioinformatics 2005 21(22):4133-4139

(Thank you to Gary Wiggins on the Chemical Information Sources Discussion List - CHMINF-L for pointing out this resource.)

Japanese Science Directory

Science Links Japan is a topically arranged directory of online information resources for science and technology in Japan. Japan's scientific and technical information (STI) scattered across or isolated on the Internet have been collected and categorized under major topics. The Website aims to provide ease of access to Japan's STI for non-Japanese researchers, policy makers and many others who need Japan's STI.

Most of the contents come from information generated/compiled in the public sector, such as the government, universities, R&D institutes and STI institutes.

Science Links Japan has been compiled with a sharp focus on URL resources available in the English language. URL resources available only in the Japanese language also have been selected from the viewpoint of comprehensiveness and importance.

Fragile Digital Data

According to a recent article in the Atlanta Journal-Constitution (June 7, 2006), humanity in the next 3 years will produce more data than in did in the past 1,000 years. Concerns of future data format and degradation are of great concern to many institutions, such as the Council on Library and Information Resources, the National Archives, IBM, and the Library of Congress. See full article for further discussion.

(Full Article VIA: George Mason University's History News Network)

First Open Access Nanotechnology Journal from Major Publisher

Springer and the Nano Research Society have announced a new partnership to publish Nanoscale Research Letters (NRL), which will be the first nanotechnology journal from a major commercial publisher to publish articles with open access. The new journal provides an interdisciplinary forum for the open communication of scientific and technological advances in the creation and use of objects at the nanometer scale. The first open access articles are scheduled to appear on Springer's online platform, SpringerLink, in July 2006.

Read the full announcement for more information.

(VIA: LISNews, June 12, 2006)

MOLTABLE - Chemoinformatics Portal & its Application in Bioinformatics

When a potentially useful drug is designed or discovered, it must be delivered in a way that maximizes its ability to benefit patients.

The Moltable initiatives to discover drug candidates against CANCER, AIDS, Malaria and other potentially devastating infectious diseases through chemoinformatics research. Drug candidates in various stages of research are being analyzed to discover new and promising candidates. Dynamic QSAR initiatives through 'focused' virtual library design and the results will be made 'open access' through Moltable portal (National Chemical Laboratory, Pune, India).

The portal includes links to projects, a repository for molecules, and various other resources.

Isaac Newton's "Alchemical Notebooks" Available Online

The Chymistry of Isaac Newton is producing a scholarly online edition of Newton's alchemical manuscripts integrated with new research on Newton's chymistry. To date, about seven hundred pages have been transcribed and encoded in TEI/XML. Of these, roughly six hundred have been edited and are available online, including Newton's Most Complete Laboratory Notebook.

Isaac Newton, like Albert Einstein, is a quintessential symbol of the human intellect and its ability to decode the secrets of nature. Newton's fundamental contributions to science include the quantification of gravitational attraction, the discovery that white light is actually a mixture of immutable spectral colors, and the formulation of the calculus. Yet there is another, more mysterious side to Newton that is imperfectly known, a realm of activity that spanned some thirty years of his life, although he kept it largely hidden from his contemporaries and colleagues. We refer to Newton's involvement in the discipline of alchemy, or as it was often called in seventeenth-century England, "chymistry."
(VIA: Librarian In Black, April 14, 2006)

International Conference on Chemoinformatics - August 2006

National Chemical Laboratory Pune, India is planning a two-day International Conference on Chemoinformatics during 7-8 August 2006 which would be participated by eminent scientist and professors in this specialized area from both academia and industries.

Several distinguished scientists from Germany, UK, USA etc. along with Indian scientists are participating in this important meeting. The conference will bring together more than 100 participants for this scholarly event focusing on the futuristic application of cheminformatics in medicinal chemistry, material science, structure elucidation and structure activity/property/toxicity relationship studies, high performance computing, chemical data mining etc., Other participants would present oral and poster presentations of their work.

Biointerphases - New Open Access Journal

The Biointerphases journal, an open access journal for the biomaterials interface community, provides an interdisciplinary platform for scientific exchange among the biology, chemistry, physics, and materials sciences communities. It offers a discussion forum for rapid dissemination of scientific theories, results, and interpretations. Biointerphases serves as a global vehicle for the biomaterials interface community as well as a platform that encourages dialog between scientists and the public with respect to cogent policy issues.

[About Biointerphases]

Biointerphases is devoted to Articles of original research, Reviews, a "Myth and Reality" section addressing controversial models and experiments, Editorial Commentary/Letters to the Editor, Perspectives on Evolving Research, Reports on Interdisciplinary Research Programs and Opinionated Essays.

Biointerphases will include all topics relevant to the study and understanding of interfaces and confined phases in biomaterial science and biophysics, e. g. such as interface spectroscopy, in vivo mechanisms, in vitro mechanisms, interface modeling, adhesion phenomena, protein-surface interactions, cell-surface interactions, biomembranes on a chip, biosensors / biodiagnostics, bio-surface modification, the nano-bio interface, biotribology / biorheology, molecular recognition, cell patterning for function, polyelectrolyte surfaces, and ambient diagnostic methods. Biointerphases is freely available online, and will be available in an annual bound volume for a nominal fee.

Open Access in Medicine

Open Access for the Medical Librarian
Heather Morrison & Andrew Waller
Delivered at the Canadian Health Libraries Association 2006: Pearls of Wisdom, Vancouver, British Columbia.

ABSTRACT:
The most important aspects of open access for the medical librarian are presented. Reasons for open access include access to research information, access to taxpayer-funded research, facilitation of evidence-based medicine, equity of access, promotion of author control, and controlling library costs. The two primary approaches to open access, via author self-archiving and open access publishing, are presented. Key open access policy developments are highlighted. Many of the major policy initiatives of the moment are from the research funders. From the researcher funders' point of view, open access means more research impact, more real-world impact when professionals can access the literature, and value is illustrated to the taxpayer, building support for further research funding. The world's largest medical research funders, including the U.S. National Institute of Health and the Wellcome Trust, have public access policies, and many more policies are in development. For example, two weeks ago the Federal Research Public Access Act was introduced in the U.S. Senate. One of the essential elements of open access policy is ensuring that researchers are required, not requested, to deposit works. In Canada, the Canadian Institutes of Health Research has a policy in development called Access to Products of Research; public comments are due May 15, 2006. The dramatic growth of open access - over 2,220 journals in DOAJ, over 7.3 million items in an OAIster search - is discussed, as is the idea of new roles for librarians in an open access environment.

Chmoggle - Chemical Information Search Engine

UPDATE:
Under pressure from Google, Chmoogle is now called eMolecules.


On November 18, 2005, eMolecules, Inc. announced the launch of Chmoogle.

Chmoogle wants to be the world's leading free open-access chemistry search engine. Chmoogle's mission is to discover, curate and index all of the public chemical information in the world, and make it available to the public. Chmoogle distinguishes itself by extremely fast searches, an appealing presentation of results, and high-quality chemical drawings. Chmoogle discovers sources of chemical data by searching the internet, and receives submissions from data providers such as chemical suppliers and academic researchers.

Chmoogle searches chemical information by drawn chemical structures, IUPAC name, or by entering SMILES nomenclature (Simplified Molecular Input Line Entry Specification).

The Chmoogle web site also includes Cheminformatics 101 - An introduction to the Computer Science and Chemistry of Chemical Information Systems.

Citation Advantage of Open Access Articles

The article Citation Advantage of Open Access Articles (PLoS Biology, volume 4, issue 5, May 2006) described a study that looked at the number of citations of open access articles versus pay publications.

Articles published as an immediate OA article on the journal site have higher impact than self-archived or otherwise openly accessible OA articles. We found strong evidence that, even in a journal that is widely available in research libraries, OA articles are more immediately recognized and cited by peers than non-OA articles published in the same journal. OA is likely to benefit science by accelerating dissemination and uptake of research findings.

How Today's Web Has Changed Technical Writing

The IEEE Professional Communication Society Newsletter (IEEE PCS, Volume 50, Number 5, May 2006) has two articles that address web development and how technical writers must adapt to "web 2.0" technologies and users.

Web Development…How Do You Define Web Development?
by Elizabeth Weise Moeller

The problem is that “web development” is such a broad term, unlike so long ago when the web was first getting started. In the end, I decided to talk about the past, the present, the future, and, in the process, highlight some trends you can watch to help keep visitors returning to your website.
What is Web 2.0 and How Will Technical Writers be Impacted?
by Amy Diehl
Web 2.0 is a movement away from understanding content as housed in websites, but instead views content as “granular.” In this way, the content can be syndicated and distributed in decentralized ways and without relying on the user visiting a site or page in order to find the information or content. With the advent of Web 2.0, or the web as platform, not place, technical writers and designers will need to rethink many of their strategies regarding how their writing works in relation to “place”.

Promoting Copyright Management & Access

John Ober in Facilitating open access: Developing support for author control of copyright (C&RL News, April 2006, Vol. 67, No. 4) discusses the role librarians have in promoting and supporting copyright management within their organizations. He discusses educational aspects and managing institutional repositories.

Libraries should be clear and honest about the logic of our advocacy, too, which seems to be: Faculty copyright retention is a necessary precondition for developing new forms of dissemination that (possibly) allow restructuring of some of the economic patterns to be more sustainable. Or, more bluntly, copyright retention and subsequent grants of use (might) reduce/remove (some) economic barriers to acquiring content for research/teaching.
For one thing reader and author visits to IR create a point-of-use opportunity, and usually a specific need, to educate scholars about copyright management, and ensure that they do, in fact, have the right to deposit their work. And while IRs can be promoted as a way to serve the scholar and library interests mentioned above, to be used IRs have to strive for unusually good related services.

Conference - Partnering in Science Information: Necessities of Change

The International Council for Scientific and Technical Information (ICSTI) announced a two-day conference, "Partnering in Science Information: Necessities of Change."

The June 7-8 conference at the National Library of Medicine allows you to network with the new players in scientific and technical information and provides insight into the new relationships and alliances forming in STI across the information lifecycle. Join the key players to see what they are planning and doing in the new digital information environment.

The conference is designed for managers and knowledge workers in STI (including scientists, publishers, librarians, digital content managers, information architects, and infrastructure developers). Session themes include:

  • New Players in the Information Life Cycle
  • Innovative Relationships: Who's partnering with whom?
  • Globalization - Internationalization
  • Moving Up the Value Chain: Information for Decision Making
  • "Repositories" in the New STI Infrastructure
  • National Centers: New Roles, Relationships, and Opportunities for Partnership
Conference speakers include Leigh Watson Healy, Outsell's Chief Analyst, and Clifford Lynch, Executive Director for the Coalition for Networked Information. You'll also hear speakers from Google, Scope e-Knowledge Center, the European Patent Office, Groxxis, Elsevier, and the Korean Institute for Scientific and Technical Information.

Register by May 26 to receive a $50 registration discount for the two-day event. The discounted rate of $250 includes networking lunches both days.

You can register online.

[What is ICSTI?]

ICSTI, The International Council for Scientific and Technical Information, offers a unique forum for interaction between organizations that create, disseminate and use scientific and technical information. ICSTI's mission cuts across scientific and technical disciplines, as well as international borders, to give member organizations the benefit of a truly global community.

Journal@rchive - Electronic Archive Initiative

Journal@rchive is an archive site of J-STAGE operated by the Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST). On Journal@rchive, academic journals scanned through the Electronic Archive Initiative are released from their first issues, including those issued in the 19th century. The Initiative commenced by JST in FY2005 aiming at two goals: (1) to preserve of academic heritages of Japan, and (2) to further promote worldwide distribution of Japanese research results.

[About J-STAGE - Introduction]

In order to maintain and develop Japan's science and technology research at an international level, it is important to disseminate outstanding research and development results to the world instantaneously. To that end, it is important to computerize bulletins of academic societies and research papers that are currently appeared on paper by user organizations and release them to the appearance on the Internet.

In order to support the information transmission function of user organizations, the "Japan Science and Technology Information Aggregator, Electronic" (J-STAGE), developed by Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), set up the hardware and software necessary for electronic journal release within JST to provide services 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. By taking advantage of the hardware and software, the user organizations are able to computerize bulletins of academic societies and research papers currently appeared with ease and at low cost. Computerrized documents can be accessed from anywhere in the world with this system. This project also links up with the National Institute of Informatics (formerly the Ministry of Education National Center for Science Information Systems (NACSIS)).

Open J-Gate - Another Open Access Database

Open J-Gate is an electronic gateway to global journal literature in open access domain. Launched in 2006, Open J-Gate is the contribution of Informatics (India) Ltd to promote OAI. Open J-Gate provides seamless access to millions of journal articles available online. Open J-Gate is also a database of journal literature, indexed from 3000+ open access journals, with links to full text at Publisher sites.

See About Open J-Gate for more information.

BioMed Central Journals Have RSS Feeds

BioMed Central offers RSS feeds for each of their journals.

[What is BioMed Central?]

BioMed Central is an independent publishing house committed to providing immediate open access to peer-reviewed biomedical research. Read more here...

Indian Institute of Astrophysics Repository

Indian Institute of Astrophysics Repository is the digital repository of publications of Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore, India, developed to capture, disseminate and preserve research publications of IIAP. You can search, browse and access full text of these publications from the repository. This Repository also hosts papers published in Bulletin of the Astronomical Society of India.

[Contents of IIAP Repository]

IIAP Repository contains full text of research publications and Ph.d theses of individuals from Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore. In addition, this repository also hosts papers from the journal Bulletin of the Astronomical Society India from Vol. 1, 1973. Presently journal articles, conference papers and preprints can be submitted to this repository and we invite all the researches to send the soft copy of your papers to library@iiap.res.in or chris@iiap.res.in and we will take care of uploading the papers into the repository.

Recently we have included Archival collection as another community in the repository. This Archival collection will include the various archival materials belonging to 18th,19th, & 20th century available in the Institute. These materials are in the form of hand-written manuscripts, photographs, Annual Reports and instruments and their descriptions. The full text of research publications of our directors of Madras Observatory and Kodaikanal Observatory will also be part of this archival collection.

[About Indian Institute of Astrophysics]

The Indian Institute of Astrophysics is a premier national centre devoted to research in astronomy, astrophysics and related physics. It traces its origin back to an observatory set up in 1786 at Madras which from the year 1792 began to formally function at its Nungambakkam premises as the Madras Observatory. With headquarters at Bangalore, the Institute's laboratories are currently active at Kodaikanal,Kavalur, Gauribidanur,Hanle and Hosakote.

FreeMind - Free Mind Mapping Software

SourceForge.net highlighted FreeMind as its February 2006 Project of the Month. FreeMind is mind-mapping software, or a tree editor. With it, you can create foldable trees of plain text notes, enriched with colors, icons, cloud-shapes, and other graphics. Folding and breadth-width search make it valuable as a knowledge base tool.

[About SourceForge.net]

SourceForge.net is the world's largest Open Source software development web site, hosting more than 100,000 projects and over 1,000,000 registered users with a centralized resource for managing projects, issues, communications, and code. SourceForge.net has the largest repository of Open Source code and applications available on the Internet, and hosts more Open Source development products than any other site or network worldwide. SourceForge.net provides a wide variety of services to projects we host, and to the Open Source community. See more here...

Track Biomedical Papers Being Discussed by Bloggers

Postgenomic collates posts from life science blogs and then does useful and interesting things with that data. For example, you can see which papers are currently being discussed by neurologists, or which web pages are being linked to by bioinformaticians. It's sort of like a hot papers meeting with the entire biomed blogging community.

A RSS feed is available to track the "Posts of the day", "Current hot stories", or "Current hot papers".

[About Postgenomic]

Postgenomic aggregates posts from life science blogs and then does useful and interesting things with that data.

For example, it allows you to get an instant picture of which web sites are being heavily linked to by researchers in the medical sciences, or which papers are being cited or reviewed most often by bioinformaticians, or which buzzwords are being used the most frequently by evolutionary biologists.

It's sort of like a hot papers meeting with the entire biomed blogging community.

Sort of.

Postgenomic's primary purpose is to act as a central repository for reviews of scientific papers and for conference reports. You can help with this by adding some very simple semantic markup to your blog posts when you write a review of a paper. In this context a "review" isn't necessarily a particularly long or critical assessment of the paper (though it could be): it's simply any information that other researchers might find useful.

(Originally shared on the Science Library Pad, March 3, 2006)

Virtual Journal for Biomedical Optics

In January of 2006, the Optical Society of America (OSA) launched the Virtual Journal for Biomedical Optics.

[About Virtual Journal for Biomedical Optics]

The Virtual Journal for Biomedical Optics (ISSN: 1931-1532) consists of selected articles recently published in OSA's peer-reviewed journals. For the virtual journal, biomedical optics is considered to include research involving the interface between light and medicine or biology. Articles are selected by the editor, Dr. Gregory W. Faris, on the basis of relevancy using OCIS codes and abstract keywords.

Each issue comprises articles published in the source journals during the previous month. Thus the February virtual journal issue features articles originally published in January. Additional content such as editorials, meeting announcements, tutorials and reviews, and articles from other publications will also be solicited and published as the virtual journal expands its scope over time.

Citations to articles in the Virtual Journal for Biomedical Optics should be made to the original source journals.

[About OSA]

Founded in 1916, the Optical Society of America (OSA) was organized to increase and diffuse the knowledge of optics, pure and applied; to promote the common interests of investigators of optical problems, of designers and of users of optical apparatus of all kinds; and to encourage cooperation among them. The purposes of the Society are scientific, technical and educational. Read more at...

What Researchers Need to Know about Open Access

Peter Suber in the SPARC Open Access Newsletter (Issue #94, February 2, 2006) shared his Six Things that Researchers Need to Know about Open Access.

  • What OA journals exist in your field?
  • OA journals are not the whole story of OA. There are also OA archives or repositories.
  • OA archiving only takes a few minutes.
  • Most non-OA journals allow authors to deposit their postprints in an OA repository.
  • Journals using the Ingelfinger Rule are a shrinking minority.
  • OA enlarges your audience and citation impact.
Read the full article for more details and examples.

(Originally shared on Quick Picks, March 20, 2006.)

Scientific Publishing, the Internet, & Copyright

Andrew Kantor (USA Today, 3/23/2006) highlighted the major issues facing scientific publishing and the role the Internet has played.

Lets look further at the state of scientific publishing...

First, the procedure of traditional publishing is flawed from the eyes of libraries. An author freely gives their article to a publisher, and the publishers sells it at a profit. The author's library than purchases the content that was originally available within the organization. The author may have signed over full rights of the article to the publisher, thus the library has to pay for something that should have been available internally for free.

What advantages are provided by traditional publications? Basically, you are looking at name recognition and a system of distribution. I think it is fairly obvious how the Internet is changing those systems.

Kantor looks at several changes that are developing already. For example, the open access publishing movement, as demonstrated by the Public Library of Science.

Coming across this article was perfect timing. Kenneth Crews, Director of the Copyright Management Center just spoke at the Kelvin Smith Library on Tuesday, April 4th. He expressed how copyright laws are driven by international pressures, money, and many other factors. He pushed hard for authors to manage their copyright rights in order to meet the needs of their organizations and themselves well into the future. It is the one time, during author to publisher negotiations, that publishers can be convinced to change their ways.

(Originally shared on Open Access News, March 23, 2006)

Fifty Years of X-ray Diffraction

On March 24, 2006, it was shared on the CHMINF-L listserv that Fifty Years of X-ray Diffraction (Dedicated to the International Union of Crystallography on the occasion of the commemoration meeting in Munich, July 1962, by P. P. Ewald, editor, and numerous crystallographers) was digitzed and freely available for use.

Do You Need an Electronic Lab Notebook?

The Scientist (March 1, 2006) explores the reasons why electronic lab notebooks are finding their way into academia and why they are becoming more of a necessity than an option.

arXiv.org e-Print Archive

Hosted by Cornell University, arXiv.org is an e-print service in the fields of physics, mathematics, non-linear science, computer science, and quantitative biology. As of February 27, 2006, it contained over 350,000 e-prints. The major subject categories are broken down into more specific subjects that allow the user to find papers of relevance to their research. Abstracts can be viewed in html and the full papers are available in PDF. RSS feeds are available for individual archives and categories.

Petroleum Journals Online

Petroleum Journals Online (PJO) publishes the first fully refereed, open access, e-journals of petroleum engineering. The publications cover the following main areas of petroleum engineering namely: petrophysics, production geology, drilling, production, reservoir engineering, and petroleum management and economics.

(Originally reported in the Internet Resources Newsletter - Issue 103, October 2005, by Roddy MacLeod)

PLoS (Public Library of Science)

I have highlighted a couple of the Public Library of Science (PLoS) open access titles in the past (PLoS Genetics and PLoS Computational Biology). Read the testimony of a CASE student that has been using the PLOS resources.

Chemistry Information Software

The EngLib blog shared an announcement of some new software for chemistry information.

  • Elsevier MDL and TEMIS launched the Chemical Entity Relationship Skill Cartridge, a software application that "identifies and extracts chemical information from text documents."
  • ChemAxon announced the lauch of a free cheminfomatics toolkit, a "FreeWeb" package to "provide its chemical editing, viewing, search, property calculation and database management toolkits at no cost to freely accessible web resources being operated for non-commercial purposes".

Figures and Tables Omitted from Online Periodical Articles

Xiaotian Chen wrote Figures and Tables Omitted from Online Periodical Articles: A Comparison of Vendors and Information Missing from Full-Text Databases in Internet Reference Services Quarterly (Volume 10, Issue 2, pages 75-88, 2005). The article compares the manner in which vendors of full-text databases deal with charts, diagrams, figures, and tables that were originally part of the periodical articles in print. The variations between the databases explored was drastic, and the same database accessed through different interfaces could have different text results.

The Case community can access the article from the E-Journal Portal.

Trends from the Entertainment Industry -Translate to Libraries?

Aaron Shaffer brought my attention to a very interesting article, called The Long Tail (Wired Magazine, Issue 12.10, October 2004). Most of us believe that the entertainment industry is driven only by the hits, probably due to all the award shows, rankings, etc. The "long tail" is all of the other albums, songs, movies, and books that account for a super large volume of sales if provided to the public. Examples like Amazon, Rhapsody, NetFlix, and eBay show that people are interested in and will buy the non-#1 materials if the resources are available to see reviews, get recommendations, and have easy access.

I think this article has long reaching consequences on libraries. First, what role does copyright have in the development of future library resources and services? I believe the intentions of copyright, that "Congress shall have the power to promote the progress of science and useful arts by securing for limited times to authors and inventors the exclusive right to their respective writings and discoveries" (U.S. Constitution, Article 1, Section 8), is very important. As copyright protection limits are continually increased in length, are will still protecting "progress" or just monetary interests? Someone would argue that economic numbers demonstrate progress, but are we using this measure at the death of future educational, cultural, and scientific discoveries? Just look at the article I shared on the KSL Reference Weblog for an example.

It appears that the "long tail" examples also counteracts the statements by book and journal publishers that open access materials would mean death to their sales. The article showed that increased access, free or very cheap, only boosted sales drastically. As people gained access, they always wanted more and more.

I think in libraries we are seeing a similar fate with Google and other Internet resources. While people are going to Google first for their questions, it results in only more questions and curiosity. The type of questions I see in the library are becoming more complicated in nature and more inquisitive on the user's part.

I think the academic libraries in Ohio have been very lucky with OhioLINK. It has allowed individual libraries more freedom (i.e. money) to maybe focus on what could be considered items that fall into the "long tail." In addition to consortia, libraries need to find the other processes that allow users access to everything and anything. It appears CASE is headed in the right direction with the increasing amount of electronic resources and collections, such as Digital Case.

Digitization of AMNH's Scientific Publications

The American Museum of Natural History Library announced the digitization of the museum's roster of scientific publications. They are freely available and searchable through a DSpace platform.

So far the following publications are available:

  • American Museum Novitates
  • Anthropological Papers of the American Museum of Natural History
  • Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History
  • Memoirs of the American Museum of Natural History

(Courtesy of the Rowland Institute Library Blog and the American Scientist Open Access Forum)

Los Alamos Technical Reports on the Federation of American Scientists Web Site

Thousands of unclassified technical reports that were published on the Los Alamos National Laboratory web site and then removed from public access have now been reposted on the Federation of American Scientists (FAS) web site.

The Los Alamos reports were archived by researchers Carey Sublette and Gregory Walker. Over the past year FAS has added more and more of the collection, which comprises an enormous 8.5 gigabytes of data, to the website.

Many of the documents have enduring if narrow scientific value, judging from the requests we regularly receive for various titles. Others are principally of historical value. Still others hold both scientific and historical interest.

For example, the 1947 study entitled "Blast Wave" (LA-2000, a 19 MB PDF file) includes original scientific papers by Hans Bethe, John von Neuman and Rudolph Peierls -- but also by Klaus Fuchs, who would be convicted in 1950 of spying for the Soviet Union.

[About Federation of American Scientists]

The Federation of American Scientists (FAS) was formed in 1945 by atomic scientists from the Manhattan Project. Endorsed by nearly 60 Nobel Laureates in biology, chemistry, economics, medicine and physics as sponsors, the Federation has addressed a broad spectrum of national security issues of the nuclear age in carrying out its mission to promote humanitarian uses of science and technology.

Dog Genome Sequence Available through Open Access

On December 8, 2005, Peter Suber on the Open Access News blog shared that the complete dog genome sequence has been published and is available "open access" on several web sites. As a side note, Peter Suber points out that the research cost $30 million, but that it was still made available for FREE.

Next time you read or hear, that research is too expensive to share freely, think about the dog genome sequencing. Science research only sees its highest benefit when shared with everyone.

Crystallography Open Database

From the SPARC Open Data Email Discussion List came an announcement of the Crystallography Open Database (COD). As of December 2005, it contained ~28,000 entries. Here is a nice description of COD and information about an alternative sister database.

The SPARC Open Data Email Discussion List will provide a forum for participants to explore issues of access to digital data associated with peer-reviewed scientific, technical, and medical (STM) research.

Science in the Web Age

Thanks to Bob Michaelson on the CHMINF-L listserv for sharing that Nature published several article about "science in the web age." The initial commentary was on the Crooked River blog.

The articles published by Nature on December 1, 2005, focused on science research and how it driven or assisted by search engines, book digitization efforts, and blogs & wikis.

NASA's Ames Research Center & Google Partnership

FCW.com reported on October 17, 2005, that Google will be partnering with NASA's Ames Research Center in order to share computer scientists and office space for information technology research and development projects. It is expected NASA will provide physical space and the data, while Google will provide searching expertise and money. The deal should be finalized in February 2006.

PerX, Pilot Engineering Repository Xsearch

The PerX project will develop a pilot service which provides subject resource discovery across a series of repositories of interest to the engineering learning and research communities. This pilot will be used as a test-bed to explore the practical issues that would be encountered when considering the possibility of full scale subject resource discovery services. See About PerX for more information.

So far 2 deliverables have been produced:


As I explore the Repository list in more detail, I will share that information as well.

Persistent Identification of Electronic Documents

Susan Lyons in Persistent Identification of Electronic Documents and the Future of Footnotes (Law Library Journal, Volume 97, Number 4, Fall 2005) discusses link rot and a possible solution.

She highlighted several studies that showed various dangerous ramifications of URL links vanishing very quickly, including:

  • Law review articles only included 4 web citations in 1994, but had grown to 96,000+ by 2003
  • A study in 1994 by Wallace Koehler, showed ~32% of web pages vanish after one year
  • In 2000, a study of URL citations in academic journals showed that half of the links had died after 3 years

Long-Lived Digital Data Collections: Enabling Research and Education for the 21st Century

In September 2005, the National Science Board published a report called Long-Lived Digital Data Collections: Enabling Research and Education in the 21st Century (NSB-05-40).

[Conclusions from Executive Summary]

The weakness of NSF strategies and policies governing long-lived data collections is that they have been developed incrementally and have not been considered collectively. Given the proliferation of these collections, the complexity of managing them, and their cost, action is imperative. The National Science Board is concerned about the current situation. Prompt and effective action will ensure that researchers and educators derive even higher value from these collections. The communities that create and use the collections will have to be fully engaged in this process. Consensus within the communities will have to inform Foundation policy, investment, and action. The need to address these issues is urgent. The opportunities are substantial.



[About the National Science Board]
The National Science Board is the governing board of the National Science Foundation (NSF), an independent Federal agency established by the National Science Foundation Act of 1950 to:
  • promote the progress of science,
  • advance the national health, prosperity, and welfare, and
  • secure the national defense.

The Board is composed of 24 part-time members, appointed by the President and confirmed by the Senate. They are selected on the basis of their eminence in basic, medical, or social sciences, engineering, agriculture, education, research management or public affairs. The NSF Director serves on the Board, ex officio.

Future of Citation Analysis

Kathleen Bauer and Nisa Bakkalbasi explore and compare a couple new resources that allow citations to be counted, in their article called An Examination of Citation Counts in a New Scholarly Communication Environment (D-Lib Magazine (September 2005, Volume 11, Number 9).

Abstract: Citation analysis is an important tool used to trace scholarly research, measure impact, and justify tenure and funding decisions. Web of Science, which indexes peer-reviewed journal literature, has been the major research database for citation tracking. Changes in scholarly communication, including preprint/postprint servers, technical reports available via the internet, and open access e-journals are developing rapidly, and traditional citation tracking using Web of Science may miss much of this new activity. Two new tools are now available to count citations: Scopus and Google Scholar. This paper presents a case study comparing the citation counts provided by Web of Science, Scopus, and Google Scholar for articles from the Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology (JASIST) published in 1985 and in 2000 using a paired t-test to determine statistical significance. Web of Science provided the largest citation counts for the 1985 articles, although this could not be tested statistically. For JASIST articles published in 2000, Google Scholar provided statistically significant higher citation counts than either Web of Science or Scopus, while there was no significant difference between Web of Science and Scopus. The implications for measuring impact in a changing scholarly communication environment are examined.

Open Letter about Expensive Journals

Theodore Bergstrom (Chair of Economics, University of California - Santa Barbara) and R. Preston McAfee (Professor of Business, Economics & Management, California Institute of Technology) have written an open letter to university presidents and provosts about the increasing prices of journals. They recommend universities charge overhead costs to publishers for the support services of professors used as editors. In addition, they recommend university libraries buy less bundled packages in order to negotiate better prices.

Related to their letter, they have created a web site the list the price per article and price per citation of about 5,000 academic journals. They feel a title is "overpriced" if the weighted index of the cost per article and the cost per citation is more than two and a half times as large as the median index for non-profit journals in the same discipline.

New Open Access Journal - Speech and Audio Processing

UPDATE: Name already changed to EURASIP Journal on Audio, Speech, and Music Processing.


As shared by Peter Suber on Open Access News, a new peer-reviewed, open access journal is available called Speech and Audio Processing.

[From Aims & Scope]

The aim of “Speech and Audio Processing” (SAP) is to bring together researchers and engineers working on the theory and applications of speech and audio processing. SAP will be an interdisciplinary journal for the dissemination of all basic and applied aspects of speech communication and audio processes.

The journal will be dedicated to having original research work, but will also allow tutorial and review articles. Articles will deal with both theoretical and practical aspects of speech and audio processing.

New Open Access Journal: EURASIP Journal on Signal Processing and Bioinformatics

UPDATE: Name has already changed to "EURASIP Journal on Bioinformatics and Systems Biology".

Hindawi Publishing Corporation is preparing to published a new open access journal called EURASIP Journal on Signal Processing and Bioinformatics.

[Aims & Scope]

The overall aim of EURASIP JSPB is to publish research results related to signal processing and bioinformatics theories and techniques relevant to a wide area of applications into the core new disciplines of genomics, proteomics, and systems biology. The journal is intended to offer a common platform for scientists from several areas including signal processing, bioinformatics, statistics, biology and medicine, who are interested in the development of algorithmic, mathematical, statistical, modeling, simulation, data mining, and computational techniques, as demanded by various applications in genomics, proteomics, system biology, and more general in health and medicine.

New Open Access Physics Title

Physical Review Special Topics - Physics Education Research has published its first issue.

The criteria for acceptance of articles will include the high scholarly and technical standards of our other Physical Review journals. The scope of the journal will cover the full range of experimental and theoretical research on the teaching and/or learning of physics. Review articles, replication studies, descriptions of the development and use of new assessment tools, presentation of research techniques, and methodology comparisons/critiques are welcomed.

Science Reporting to the Public: Science and the Media

Organized by Division of Chemical Information (CINF)

At 231st American Chemical Society National Meeting, Atlanta, GA, March 26-30, 2006

This symposium deals with the presentation of scientific information to the public. Potential topics include case studies of science reporting; the methods used in selecting topics for science reporting and for explaining them to the non-specialist audience; ethical issues in science reporting; the portrayal of science and scientists (especially chemistry, chemists and the chemical industry) in the popular media, etc.

If you are interested in being a speaker for this symposium, please submit an abstract via the ACS OASYS system. A direct link to the CINF sessions is below: http://oasys.acs.org/acs/231nm/cinf/papers/index.cgi

The deadline for abstract submission is November 23.

Please excuse duplicate posting.

Chuck Huber
Symposium Chair
Chemical Sciences Librarian
Davidson Library
University of California Santa Barbara
huber@library.ucsb.edu

CINF E-News - Goes Open Access

CINF E-news, a publication of the American Chemical Society (ACS) Division of Chemical Information, is now available open access with the hope it will reach to additional chemical information professionals.

In addition, from the latest issue (v.7:1, Fall 2005), comes the announcement of the CINF-IO Informatics Scholarship for Scientific Excellence.

The scholarship program of the Division of Chemical Information (CINF) of the American Chemical Society (ACS) funded by IO Informatics is designed to reward graduate students in chemical information and related sciences for scientific excellence and to foster their involvement in CINF.

Five scholarships valued at $1,000 each will be given out at both the Spring and Fall ACS National Meetings in a given year for a total of $10,000/year. Additionally, the winners will receive an annual license, free-of-charge, of IO Informatic's software Sentinent for their academic institution. The grants have been awarded for the first time at the 230th National Meeting of ACS in Washington, DC.

The first three winners of the CINF-IO Scholarship Award are:
Kunal Aggarwal, School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Cornell University, Ivan Tubert-Brohman, Department of Chemistry, Yale University, and Jérôme Hert, Department of Information Studies, University of Sheffield.

Applicants must be enrolled at a certified college or university. They have to present a poster at the respective National Meeting. Abstracts for the poster have to be submitted according to ACS rules on or before the deadline for electronic submission using OASYS (http://oasys.acs.org/oasys.htm). Point to the division (CINF) and select Poster session. Applications are accepted for the 2006 Spring ACS Meeting in Atlanta (March 26 - 30, 2006). The deadline for submission an abstract is November 23, 2005. Additionally, a 2,000-word long abstract describing the work to be presented has to be sent in electronic form before February 1st, 2006, to the chair of the selection committee at ggrethe@comcast.net. Any questions related to applying for one of the scholarships should be directed to the same e-mail address.
Winners will be chosen based on content, presentation and relevance of the poster and will be announced at the meeting. The content shall reflect upon the student's work and describe research in the field of chemoinformatics and related sciences. Winning posters will be marked "Winner of the CINF-IO Informatics Scholarship for Scientific Excellence" at the poster session.

Journal Impact Factors - Good & Bad

The Chronicle of Higher Education, on October 14, 2005, published an article called The Number That's Devouring Science. The article points out ways publishers are exploiting the system to increase their visibility, and how the impact factor has become a measure for hiring, tenure, and research grants. The article points out how publishers, because of how the impact factors are measured and used, may be harming scientific research and publication.

Two Resign over ACS vs PubChem

Two members of a American Chemical Society (ACS) committee have resigned in protect of the handling of the disagreement with the National Institute of Health. See more at Science Magazine, Volume 309, Number 5743, Issue of 23 September 2005.

My previous posting in June provided more background information.

Journal of International Medical Research - Open Access Journal Title

Thanks to George S. Porter on the CHMINF-L listserv for sharing this announcement on this new open access journal. Journal of International Medical Research provides articles free on the Internet, because it operates under a page sponsorship fee system.

[About Journal of International Medical Research]

Founded in 1972, The Journal of International Medical Research has established itself as a leading journal for rapid publication of original medical, pre-clinical and clinical research.

Clinical and pre-clinical studies are welcomed as are reviews, case reports, preliminary communications and studies on new indications or new formulations of established products. Post-marketing surveillance, pharmacoeconomic and managed care studies are also invited.

Journal supplements for symposium proceedings, summaries of presentations or collections of medical, pre-clinical or clinical data on a specific topic are published and enquiries from potential sponsors of these are welcome.

All medical areas will be considered for publication including animal pharmacology, clinical pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, drug metabolism, toxicology, teratology and clinical trials.

Immunome Research - New Open Access Title

Thanks to George S. Porter on the CHMINF-L listserv for sharing this announcement on this new open access journal. BioMed Central has started publication of its newest open access journal title, Immunome Research.

[About Immunome Research]

Immunome Research is an Open Access, peer-reviewed, online journal integrating traditional laboratory research with the latest technologies, including genomics, bioinformatics and mathematical modelling.

Immunome Research is a journal of the International Immunomics Society (IIMMS). The journal aims to provide a focal point for the field of Immunomics, which lies at the intersection between traditional laboratory research and the latest research technologies. It thereby includes the sub-speciality immunoinformatics, as well as the application of large-scale genomics to the immune system. Rapidly expanding areas of particular interest include the predicting of MHC-peptide binding, mathematical modelling of viral/host interactions, and the use of gene expression arrays to model immune system pathways.

To date there has been no specialty journal covering this new and rapidly expanding domain. Researchers published their immunomics research either in general immunology journals or in bioinformatics journals. These journals generally do not have ready access to expert reviewers with knowledge in both domains - i.e. traditional immunology and bioinformatics/modelling. Furthermore, researchers interested in reading more in the area cannot easily access or find relevant articles, which are sprinkled across many different journals. The International Immunomics Society (IIMMS) has a rapidly growing membership that has expressed the need to have a high quality specialist journal to provide consistent standards to the field and provide a focal point for growth of this area.

Is 50% of all scientific papers in error?

EngLib on August 31st, 2005, shared information on an article which suggests that 50% of all scientific papers present the wrong conclusion.

The New Scientist contained a short article with a summary and some commentary. The original article, Why Most Published Research Findings Are False, can be found on PLOS Medicine's web site.

[About PLoS Medicine]

PLoS Medicine is an open-access, peer-reviewed medical journal published monthly, online and in print, by the Public Library of Science (PLoS), a nonprofit organization. The inaugural issue was launched on 19 October 2004.

Open Access - Beilstein Journal of Organic Chemistry

BioMed Central has started publication of its newest open access journal title, the Beilstein Journal of Organic Chemistry.

[About Beilstein Journal of Organic Chemistry]
Beilstein Journal of Organic Chemistry is an Open Access, peer-reviewed online journal that will encompass all aspects of organic chemistry. Full research papers and preliminary communications (short reports) will be published in the journal.

The journal covers organic chemistry in its broadest sense, including: organic synthesis, organic reactions, natural products chemistry, supramolecular chemistry and chemical biology.

Beilstein Journal of Organic Chemistry offers organic chemists a unique opportunity to publish their research rapidly in an Open Access medium that is freely available online to researchers worldwide. In doing so it not only offers authors uniquely wide visibility and high impact, but it also ensures that their work is part of the permanent, publicly available archive of science. Open Access does not compromise the high quality of the articles published. All manuscripts submitted to the journal are subject to rigorous peer review.

2 New Open Access Bioinformatics Journals

Libertas Academica has started publication of 2 new open access bioinformatics journals.

Cancer Informatics is a peer-reviewed, open-access research journal where those engaged in cancer research can turn for rapid communication of the latest advances in the application of bioinformatics and computational biological toward the discovery of new knowledge in oncology and cancer biology, and toward the clinical translation of that knowledge to increase the efficacy of practicing oncologists, radiologists and pathologists. See Cancer Informatics: aims and scope for more information.

Evolutionary Bioinformatics Online will began publication in the near future. Evolutionary Bioinformatics is an international, peer-reviewed journal focusing on evolutionary bioinformatics. There is growing awareness that to understand organismal form and function, through the use of molecular, genetic, genomic, and proteomic data, due consideration must be given to an organism's evolutionary context - history constrains the path an organism is obliged to take, and leaves an indelible mark on its component parts. Evolutionary Bioinformatics Online publishes papers on all aspects of computational evolutionary biology, and evolutionary bioinformatics. See Evolutionary Bioinformatics Online: aims and scope for more information.

[About Us - Libertas Academica]

Libertas Academica was launched in late 2004 when it was becoming increasingly apparent that the old, subscription-based, scholarly journal publishing model was rapidly being overtaken. Real advances in technology and its widespread availability combined with authors and librarians increasing frustrations at the established journal publishing business meant that significant changes were about to take place.

Libertas seeks to combine the very best of conventional journal publishing with the newest technology and freshest thinking in the area of OpenAccess journals. We also wish to expand the OpenAccess model to include text books.

E-textbooks with expiration dates

CNET News.com recently shared a story about several universities that will be offering textbooks in PDF format. The experimental program will offer a selection of e-books to students at a 33% discount, while the print equivalents will still be offered as well. The restrictions include only having access on one computer, a 5-month expiration date, and limitations on printing the complete text. Students would also need to adapt to having the money savings up front, instead of selling books back at the end of the semester.

New Open Access Journal - PLoS Genetics

PLoS, the Public Library of Science, announced the launch of their fourth Open Access journal on July 24th. PLoS Genetics publishes human studies, as well as research on model organisms—from mice and flies, to plants and bacteria. Topics include (but are not limited to) gene discovery and function, population genetics, genome projects, comparative and functional genomics, medical genetics, cancer biology, evolution, gene expression, complex traits, chromosome biology, and epigenetics. More information about PLoS Computational Biology can be found at the web site.

Additional titles include:
PLoS Genetics
Fulltext v1+ (2005+)

PLoS Computational Biology
Fulltext v1+ (2005+)

PLoS Biology
Fulltext v1+ (2003+)

PLoS Medicine
Fulltext v1+ (2003+)

New Open Access Journal - PLoS Computational Biology

PLoS, the Public Library of Science, announced the launch of their third Open Access journal on June 24th. PLoS Computational Biology features works of exceptional significance that further our understanding of living systems at all scales through the application of computational methods. Readers include life and computational scientists, who can take the important findings presented here to the next level of discovery. More information about PLoS Computational Biology can be found at the web site.

Additional titles include:
PLoS Computational Biology
Fulltext v1+ (2005+)

PLoS Biology
Fulltext v1+ (2003+)

PLoS Medicine
Fulltext v1+ (2003+)

In the public interest: Open access

Thanks to Ben Wagner on the CHMINF-L listserv for reminding me of this wonderful story of how open access to information can benefit everyone. I personally have heard Sharon Terry speak. She is a wonderful advocate for open access to information and an inspiration to parents that are confronted by health concerns of their children.

In the public interest: Open access
C&RL News, July/August 2005
Vol. 66, No. 7
by Sharon Terry

Author-Driven Access to ACS Published Articles

The American Chemical Society (ACS) has several partial open access initiatives. First, ACS will submit articles to PubMed Central that were funded by National Institutes of Health (NIH) funds. Second, authors can provide links to their articles. During the first 12 months, 50 free e-prints will be available through the author's web links. After 12 months, the restriction will be listed.

For more detailed information, see Frequently Asked Questions Regarding ACS Author-driven Initiatives.

Continue reading "Author-Driven Access to ACS Published Articles"

XML and Chemical Information

Managing Information News (July 18, 2005) provided a summary of an article titled Communication and re-use of chemical information in bioscience. The original article by Peter Murray-Rust, John Mitchell, and Henry Rzepa is available freely online through the open-access journal, BMC Bioinformatics.

The current methods of publishing chemical information in bioscience articles are analysed. Using 3 papers as use-cases, it is shown that conventional methods using human procedures, including cut-and-paste are time-consuming and introduce errors. The meaning of chemical terms and the identity of compounds is often ambiguous. Valuable experimental data such as spectra and computational results are almost always omitted. We describe an Open XML architecture as proof-of-concept which addresses these concerns. Compounds are identified through explicit connection tables or links to persistent Open resources such as PubChem. It is argued that if publishers adopt these tools and protocols, then the quality and quantity of chemical information available to bioscientists will increase and the authors, publishers and readers will find the process cost-effective.

Is Faked Research Results on the Rise?

Wired News carried an Associated Press article that looked at the increase volume of faked research receiving federal funds.

The articles cited a researcher that studies why scientists are making up their results.

David Wright, a Michigan State University professor who has researched why scientists cheat, said there are four basic reasons: some sort of mental disorder; foreign nationals who learned somewhat different scientific standards; inadequate mentoring; and, most commonly, tremendous and increasing professional pressure to publish studies.

AutoTechnology magazine goes free online

AutoTechnology now offers a free online version. The only catch is they did not use html or Adobe PDF, but require a user to use the free Zinio Reader.

[About AutoTechnology]

This bimonthly publication dishes out a full spread of information that´s sure to interest you if you are responsible for automotive development, engineering or production. Packed with articles and news on current topics in the international automotive industry, written by practicing specialists.

Interviews with engineering managers and decision-makers as well as reports from the various branches of the industry and the presentation of innovative products round off the wide range of subjects.

AutoTechnology is the official magazine of FISITA, the world body of automotive engineers.

Free Dailty STM News.

From the SLA-DCHE listserv came the following announcement:

We are about to launch Knowledgespeak, the first online news service to report on a daily basis, all the relevant developments within the STM publishing industry. This free service will also offer additional resources including a blog area, calendar of events, articles, white papers and a directory of STM publishers.

Subscribers to Knowledgespeak will be able to:

* Stay informed by receiving daily news summaries of any important industry developments, forthcoming events, new products and services launched, etc.
* Track competitor activity
* Discuss and participate in relevant blogs
* Easily locate relevant database providers, events, interesting articles and white papers, etc.
* Search for past articles
* STM publishers will also be able to promote their products/services by sending in their press releases and through online advertising

We want to make sure that Knowledgespeak is a valuable resource for everyone involved in the STM publishing industry. Hence we kindly request your comments and suggestions on the newsletter and the website area. The following link will allow you to see a sample of today

ACS LiveWire 6.7 (July 2005)

ACS LiveWire 6.7 (July 2005) was just published.

Highlights include:

American Chemical Society and NIH's PubChem

The University of California's Office of Scholarly Communication has a created a web site to summarize the activities surrounding the American Chemical Society's attempt to shut down PubChem. The web site includes background information, position statements, facts & fugures, and suggestion of what people can do to fight this.

UC's Academic Council wrote letters to both ACS and members of Congress.

New Journal - Small

Wiley-VCH introduced a new publication in January of 2005, Small. Small is the new interdisciplinary journal for Nano and Micro Science and Technology. More product information or a sample issue is available.

Open Access - Beilstein Journal of Organic Chemistry

The Beilstein Journal of Organic Chemistry, a new peer-reviewed online journal published by the Beilstein-Institut in co-operation with BioMed Central, is now ready to accept articles for publication and invites organic chemists worldwide to submit appropriate manuscripts for consideration. As an open access journal the Beilstein Journal of Organic Chemistry will allow readers free access to all content in perpetuity worldwide.

"The Beilstein Journal of Organic Chemistry will publish outstanding original research on all aspects of organic chemistry and related disciplines. Areas covered in the journal include: organic synthesis, organic reactions and mechanisms, natural products chemistry and chemical biology, organic materials and macro- and supramolecular organic chemistry." [http://bjoc.beilstein-journals.org/]

Open Access Computer Journals

Theory of Computing is a new online journal dedicated to the widest dissemination, free of charge, of high quality research papers in all areas of Theoretical Computer Science. First article was published on February 9, 2005. Quantum Computing is published as a section of Theory of Computing.

Logical Methods in Computer Science is a fully refereed, open access, free, electronic journal. It welcomes papers on theoretical and practical areas in computer science involving logical methods, taken in a broad sense. First article was published in 2005.

American Chemical Society Publication Prices

American Chemical Society (ACS) has announced changes to its pricing structure and access options for its electronic journals in 2006.

In addition, Library Journal has shown that ACS offers the best value for chemistry publications.

More information available through LiveWire. LiveWire is an online newsletter by the American Chemical Society that summarizes developments in its publications.

Open Access Math Journals

The fulltext contents of two journals published by Hindawi Publishing are now available for free.

Mathematical Problems in Engineering
v.1(1995)-present
http://www.hindawi.com/journals/mpe/

Differential Equations and Nonlinear Mechanics
Coming in 2005
http://www.hindawi.com/journals/denm/

Thanks to Peter Suber, Open Access News, for monitoring developments in the open access publishing world.

Scientists and Literature

UPDATE:
AAAS link for presentation appears to be dead and no alternative has been posted.

At the 30th Annual AAAS Forum on Science & Technology Policy, Dr. Carol Tenopir (Professor of Information Sciences at the University of Tennessee) gave a presentation, titled "What Scientists Really Need Regarding Publishing and Access." She highlighted studies that showed scientists are reading more in less time, relying on the technology to locate articles rather than browsing complete journal issues, and making decisions based on convenience.

Proceedings of the Japan Academy. Series A: Mathematical Sciences

The Proceedings of the Japan Academy. Series A: Mathematical Sciences is now available for free through an open access publishing model.

Open Access Publishing in the Sciences

The cover story from the May 16, 2005, issue of Chemical & Engineering News describes the current thoughts and stages of development in open access publishing. In the article "Opening Access", several scientific publishers comment on open access publishing, and describe the positives and negatives of the proposed publishing models.

The Case community can view the article online or in print at the Kelvin Smith Library.

On a related note, the National Academies has a free PDF report available, called "Are Chemical Journals Too Expensive and Inaccessible?: A Workshop Summary to the Chemical Sciences Roundtable."

Publishing Relationship in Chemistry & Physics

William W. Armstrong wrote a great article (Communication in the Sciences as Seen through Physics and Chemistry: A Look at the Complex Relationship between Author, Publisher, and Distributor as They Relate to the Reader) on the exploration of the publishing process in the chemistry and physics academic environment. It appeared in the March 2005 issue of College & Research Libraries (American Library Association).

The Case community can find the article at several of the Case Libraries.

Chemical Market Reporter

Chemical Market Reporter has removed its chemical pricing information from the print publication to a secured website. I have been working with the publisher to find a way for Case's faculty and students to continually have access to this title.

The Case community can expect an announcement for electronic access to the web site in the near future.

Classic Textbooks in Science

Catherine Lavallée-Welch (EngLib) shared information about the digitization of out of print classic science texts.

Classic Textbooks in Science
, a project of the National Academy of Sciences, currently includes Heredity and Development, 2nd Edition, by John A. Moore.

Librarians & Scientists Partner in Bioinformatics

Librarians and scientists at Purdue University will be exploring how to preserve and utilize the large quantities of biological information, especially genetics.

The full story was originally available at the Purdue University News web site.

New Open Access Journal: Globalization and Health

Title: Globalization and Health
Editor-in-chief: Greg Martin, Derek Yach
Abbreviation: Global Health
ISSN: 1744-8603
URL: http://www.globalizationandhealth.com/home

Globalization and Health is an Open Access, peer-reviewed, online journal that provides a platform for research, knowledge sharing and debate on the topic of globalization and its effects on health, both positive and negative. 'Globalization' essentially refers to anything 'supra-territorial', anything that transcends the geopolitical boundaries of the nation-state. As a process it is being driven by liberalisation of markets and technological advancements. In essence, it is about human proximity - people are now living in each other's metaphorical pockets. More about...

BioMed Central has been a leader in scientific publishing using an open access model.

More BioMed Central open access journals can be found in the OhioLINK Library Catalog by searching for "biomed central", or by proceeding directly to the BioMed Central web site.