November 13, 2006

Diabetes Research Retreat to highlight impact of clinical trials on treatment of diabetes

Continuing the promotion of cross-institutional collaboration, Diabetes Association of Greater Cleveland's Dietrich Diabetes Research Institute (DDRI) and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine present the third annual Diabetes Research Retreat on Friday, November 17, 2006, at Executive Caterers at Landerhaven. More than 200 diabetes researchers from northeast Ohio's major medical institutions and universities are expected to participate in the event, focusing on "Clinical Trials and Putative Mechanisms of Disease."

"Coupled with strength in basic science, Cleveland's participation and leadership in national clinical trials illustrates the broad focus of diabetes research in northeast Ohio," states Patrick M. Catalano, MD, Professor and Chair, Reproductive Biology, Case Western Reserve University at MetroHealth Medical Center and Chair of the DDRI Task Force. "Cleveland's role in clinical trials highlights the commitment to improving public health through translational research that has a direct impact on patients here and now."

Retreat attendees will have the privilege of hearing from nationally renowned speakers in the area of clinical diabetes research. David Nathan, MD, Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School and Director, Diabetes Center and General Clinical Research Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, will deliver the keynote address: "The Importance of Supporting Clinical Trial Research in the Academy." Plenary speakers include Robert Ratner, MD, Professor of Medicine, Georgetown University Medical School and Vice-President for Scientific Affairs for the MedStar Research Institute, and Clifton Bogardus III, MD, Chief, Phoenix Epidemiology and Clinical Research Branch, NIDDK, NIH.

In addition, two notable local researchers who have served as Primary Investigators in significant multi-center clinical trials, Saul Genuth, MD, Professor of Medicine at Case School of Medicine and Co-Chair of the Steering Committee of the Case School of Medicine's Diabetes Center Task Force and Byron Hoogwerf, MD, staff physician at The Cleveland Clinic and member of the DDRI Task Force will focus on the ACCORD, BARI2D, DCCT/EDIC, HOPE, DREAM, and CABG clinical trials.

The incidence of type 2 diabetes in Greater Cleveland has tripled since 1970. More than 400,000 Greater Clevelanders are expected to have type 2 diabetes by 2010. These statistics demonstrate the public health crisis that we are facing in Cleveland.

"This Retreat will provide the perfect forum to put local and national clinical trials at the forefront of diabetes care and treatment," states Jacquie Dickinson, President & CEO of the Diabetes Association of Greater Cleveland. "The results from these clinical trials are setting the standards for improved direct care for the 1 in 14 people in our community with diabetes."

For more information about the Diabetes Research Retreat and for a complete schedule of events, visit http://www.ddri.org/Retreat2006.asp. To attend as a media guest for all or a portion of the day, please contact Tracy Cordes or Susan Licate (contact information above).

About Case School of Medicine

Founded in 1843, the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine is the largest medical research institution in Ohio and 12th largest among the nation's medical schools for research funding from the National Institutes of Health. Eleven Nobel Laureates have been affiliated with the school.

The School of Medicine is recognized throughout the international medical community for outstanding achievements in teaching. In 2002, it became only the third medical school in history to receive the best review possible from the national body responsible for accrediting the nation's medical schools. It ranks in the top 25 among U.S. research-oriented medical schools in the U.S. News and World Report Guide to Graduate Education. Annually, the School of Medicine trains more than 600 M.D. and M.D./Ph.D. students. The School's Western Reserve2 curriculum interweaves four themes—research and scholarship, clinical mastery, leadership, and civic professionalism—to prepare students for the practice of evidence-based medicine in the rapidly changing health care environment of the 21st century.

The School of Medicine's primary clinical affiliate is University Hospitals Case Medical Center and the school is additionally affiliated with MetroHealth Medical Center, the Louis Stokes Cleveland Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, and the Cleveland Clinic Foundation, with which it opened the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University in 2004.

About the Diabetes Association of Greater Cleveland's Dietrich Diabetes Research Institute

Established in 2003 at the Diabetes Association of Greater Cleveland by Nancy and Richard Dietrich, the Dietrich Diabetes Research Institute is an independent, regional diabetes research clearinghouse whose mission is to: (1) To strengthen the diabetes research presence in Northeast Ohio by facilitating collaborative efforts in diabetes research, (2) Serve as a diabetes research information clearinghouse to help enhance the overall quality of clinical care for patients with diabetes in northeast Ohio, and (3) Help people with diabetes understand new research and its effect on their medical care. For more information about DDRI, visit http://www.ddri.org or call 216-591-0800.

For more information contact Susan Licate, 216.368.3635 or Tracy Cordes, 216.591.0800.

Posted by: Heidi Cool, November 13, 2006 02:37 PM | News Topics: Collaborations/Partnerships, HeadlinesMain, Healthcare, Provost Initiatives, Research, School of Medicine

Case Western Reserve University is committed to the free exchange of ideas, reasoned debate and intellectual dialogue. Speakers and scholars with a diversity of opinions and perspectives are invited to the campus to provide the community with important points of view, some of which may be deemed controversial. The views and opinions of those invited to speak on the campus do not necessarily reflect the views of the university administration or any other segment of the university community.