August 20, 2007

School of Law Encourages Programs, Research that Benefit Larger Community

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The Centers of Excellence at the School of Law allow for collaborative and synergistic academic ventures among faculty and students, and encourage programs and research that benefit the law profession as well as the larger community.

The Milton A. Kramer Law Clinic Center is an in-house, real client clinic where third-year students provide legal services to people who can't afford to hire an attorney. The law students provide hands on expertise as the primary legal counsel for the clients from start to finish. Under the direction of faculty guidance, students handle a broad range of legal matters, including: family law divorce, consumer matters, elder and disability law, estate planning and probate, nonprofit incorporation and advising, and criminal misdemeanors. Simultaneously -- through work in the Kramer Law Clinic -- students actualize their responsibility to provide access to justice for underrepresented groups and individuals in the community.

Law students also provide support to the community beyond legal representation through the Big Buddies Program. Once a week, "little buddies" from the Cleveland Metropolitan School District's Mary Bethune Elementary and Harry Davis Junior High schools are bussed to the law school. They are mentored by law students, spend time on schoolwork, and participate in recreational activities. The program is coordinated through the Big Brothers/Big Sisters of Greater Cleveland.

Visit the school's Web site to learn more about its community outreach initiatives.

Posted by: Kimyette Finley, August 20, 2007 12:39 PM | News Topics: Community Outreach

Case Western Reserve University is committed to the free exchange of ideas, reasoned debate and intellectual dialogue. Speakers and scholars with a diversity of opinions and perspectives are invited to the campus to provide the community with important points of view, some of which may be deemed controversial. The views and opinions of those invited to speak on the campus do not necessarily reflect the views of the university administration or any other segment of the university community.