October 18, 2007

Analysis of breast and colon cancer genes finds many areas of differences between tumors

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Researchers from University Hospitals Ireland Cancer Center and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine are part of a new national study that has analyzed more than 18,000 genes, including 5,000 previously unmapped genes, from breast and colorectal tumors.

The study, published online by the journal ScienceXpress on October 11, shows a great number of genetic differences between breast and colon cancer tumors, leading the researchers to conclude that new drugs must be developed that can hit these newly identified genetic targets in a manner specific to each different individuals' tumor.

Sanford Markowitz, the Ingalls Professor of Cancer Research at the UH Ireland Cancer Center and Case Western Reserve University, said, "The new insights gained are important in that they indicate there is great genetic diversity from one tumor to the next. Only a handful of genes are common targets for damage, and it will accordingly be necessary to develop a panel of drugs that target specific mutant genes in order to be able to provide individualized cancer treatment to different individual patients."

More than a dozen research institutions were involved with this study. Markowitz is also an investigator with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

For more information, refer to University Hospitals.

Posted by: Marsha Bragg, October 18, 2007 10:02 AM | News Topics: Faculty, HeadlinesMain, Healthcare, Provost Initiatives, Research, School of Medicine, Science

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