April 01, 2008

Embryonic stem-cell research, corporate governance, terrorist financing and torture of prisoners in U.S. custody highlight School of Law's April lectures

School of Law
School of Law

How do attitudes towards embryonic stem-cell research shape legal actions? How are international organizations and countries cooperating to fight terrorism financing? These questions are among the many that will be explored during the month of April as part of the Case Western Reserve University School of Law's Spring Lecture Series.

The month's series of talks begins April 2 with anthropologist Janet Dolgin, the Jack and Freda Dicker Distinguished Professor of Health Care Law at Hofstra University School of Law. A widely sought after speaker on health care law, bioethics and family law, Dolgin will talk about "Attitudes Toward Embryonic Stem-Cell Research."

On April 8, Hon. Frank H. Easterbrook, Chief Justice of the U.S. Court of Appeals 7th Circuit, will deliver a talk entitled "Is Corporate Law Still a Race for the Top?," revisiting issues relating to corporate law, in particular whether competition between states for corporate charters produces a "race to the top" of corporate law, a long-standing assumption in academic literature.

The Frederick K. Cox International Law Center Symposium brings leading counter-terrorism experts and international dignitaries to Cleveland April 11 for the day-long "World Conference on Combating Terrorist Financing." It is cosponsored by the School of Law's Institute for Global Security Law & Policy and the Association Internationale de Droit Penal (AIDP). Scheduled speakers include members of the United Nations Al-Qaida/Taliban Monitoring Team, U.S. Department of Justice counter-terrorism experts, members of the Financial Action Task Force, World Bank and leading international financial institutions, and academic scholars.

Part of a Preparatory Colloquium for the AIDP's 18th International Congress of Penal Law, panel discussions during the symposium will include: charities regulation and terrorism financing, civil liberties considerations in creating lists of terrorists and terrorist organizations, identification by financial institutions of suspicious transactions related to terrorism financing, and the future of international cooperation in stopping terrorism financing. The symposium is made possible by support from the Yanowitz Family Foundation.

A presentation by Jameel Jaffer, American Civil Liberties Union National Security Project director, "Torture: A History of the Present" concludes the month's topics on April 14. Since 2003, the ACLU has been litigating for records relating to the treatment of prisoners held by the U.S. at Abu Ghraib and other facilities overseas, and the documents it has obtained tell a story that is starkly different from the one that has been told by the Bush administration. Jaffer will talk about the litigation, the documents, and the Bush administration's controversial torture policies.

All talks will be held in the School of Law's Moot Courtroom (A59), located at 11075 East Blvd. In addition, all lectures will be webcast live online . The April 2, 8 and 14 lectures will run from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. and the April 11 symposium runs from 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. All four events are free and open to the public. There is no charge for CLE credit for each one-hour lecture for lawyers who attend, but there is a $200 CLE fee for lawyers who attend the symposium (7.5 hours CLE credit). Visit the Web site for more information and to register online for the symposium.

April topics and speakers at the School of Law include:

April 2, 2008 4:30- 5:30 p.m.

The Law-Medicine Center presents

"Attitudes Toward Embryonic Stem-Cell Research," featuring Hoftsra University law professor Janet Dolgin, who will examine one of most discussed and debated topics in medical research today. Much of her scholarly work has analyzed legal responses to shifts in family, including those occasioned by developments in reproductive technology and by "new genetics." Widely sought after to speak on health care law, bioethics and family law throughout the United States and abroad, Dolgin combines insights from her expertise in anthropology and her legal scholarship. Her books includeJewish Identity and the JDL Symbolic Anthropology, Defining the Family and Bioethics and the Law.

April 8, 2008 4:30-5:30 p.m.

Dean Lindsey Cowen Business Law Lecture

Presented by the Center for Business Law and Regulation

"Is Corporate Law Still a Race for the Top" revisits issues relating to corporate law, in particular whether competition between states for corporate charters produces a "race to the top" of corporate law, a long-standing assumption in academic literature. Regarded as one of the most prominent federal judges on the appellate bench, Easterbrook joined the court in 1985 when he was appointed by President Reagan, and has been chief judge since 2006. He was a professor of law at the University of Chicago before joining the Court of Appeals and continues to teach courses there. His interests lie in antitrust law, criminal law and procedure and other subjects involving implicit or explicit markets.

April 11, 2008 8:30 a.m.- 6 p.m.

Frederick K. Cox International Law Center Symposium

Presented by the School of Law's Institute for Global Security Law & Policy and the Association Internationale de Droit Penal (AIDP)

The "World Conference on Combating Terrorist Financing," a day-long symposium, will bring together widely known speakers and international counter-terrorism task force members to examine key topics: charities regulation and terrorism financing, civil liberties considerations in creating lists of terrorists and terrorist organizations, identification by financial institutions of suspicious transactions related to terrorism financing and the future of international cooperation in stopping terrorism financing. Richard Barrett, coordinator of the United Nations Al-Qaida/Taliban Monitoring Team, and Rick McDonell, Head of Secretariat, Financial Action Task Force, are featured speakers. Panelists include Jeffrey Breinholt, deputy chief of the U.S. Department of Justice Counterterrorism Section; Latifah Merican Cheong, United Nations Counter-Terrorism Implementation Task Force, Hon. Sue Eckert, former assistant secretary of export administration under President Clinton; and many others. There is a $200 CLE fee for lawyers who attend the symposium (7.5 hours CLE credit). Register online.

April 14, 2008 4:30-5:30 p.m.

Institute for Global Security Law and Policy presents

"Torture: A History of the Present," a discussion of the abuse and torture of prisoners in U.S. custody at Abu Ghraib and elsewhere overseas with Jameel Jaffer, ACLU litigator and National Security Project director. One of National Law Journal's "40 under 40" in 2005, Jaffer's litigation docket includes challenges to the FBI's national security letter authority, the constitutionality of warrantless surveillance and the government's refusal to grant a visa to Swiss scholar Tariq Ramadan, among others. He co-authored "Administration of Torture" and edited a collection of government documents relating to the abuse and torture of prisoners.

Coming Up:

"Newborn Screening for Nontreatable Disorders," a half-day symposium presented by the Law-Medicine Center at Renaissance Hotel in Cleveland (May 2, 2008).

The annual Lecture Series at the Case Western Reserve University School of Law is highly anticipated by students, scholars, and legal prac­ti­tion­ers alike. Each year, it bring­s to Cleveland some of the world's most sought-after speakers and authors who share their expertise on a var­i­ety of legal and current topics.

To learn more, go online or call 216-368-3304 or toll-free 1-800-492-3308.

For more information contact Jason Tirotta, 216.368.6890.

Posted by: Kimyette Finley, April 1, 2008 09:56 AM | News Topics: Faculty, HeadlinesMain, Lectures/Speakers, Provost Initiatives

Case Western Reserve University is committed to the free exchange of ideas, reasoned debate and intellectual dialogue. Speakers and scholars with a diversity of opinions and perspectives are invited to the campus to provide the community with important points of view, some of which may be deemed controversial. The views and opinions of those invited to speak on the campus do not necessarily reflect the views of the university administration or any other segment of the university community.