April 02, 2009

Podcast of City Club Speech on School of Medicine Research Available Online

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Pamela B. Davis, M.D., Ph.D., dean of Case Western Reserve University's School of Medicine, recently shared just a few highlights from the groundbreaking research taking place at the school with a City Club of Cleveland audience.

In her speech last week, Davis discussed what she described as "the twin passions of my professional life: achieving medical discoveries and using them to change the lives of patients." As the head of the School of Medicine, Davis leads an academic division ranked among the top 25 medical schools in the nation by U.S. News & World Report.

She shared with the audience how researchers at Case Western Reserve pioneered medical and technological breakthroughs in the past, and how the school continues reaching for new heights in the current era of medical discovery. During her talk, Davis highlighted some of the innovative partnerships and collaborations taking place now that could lead to the medical discoveries of tomorrow.

As the oldest continuous free speech forum in the country, the City Club of Cleveland is considered the region's premier public podium for civic dialogue. Guest speakers represent a variety of fields and provide a national forum of free speech designed to stir discussion and learning.

The campus community can hear the complete talk by listening to the podcast.

For more information contact Christina DeAngelis, 216.368.3635.

Posted by: Kimyette Finley, April 2, 2009 01:38 PM | News Topics: Faculty, Lectures/Speakers, Podcasts, Provost Initiatives, Research, School of Medicine, news

Case Western Reserve University is committed to the free exchange of ideas, reasoned debate and intellectual dialogue. Speakers and scholars with a diversity of opinions and perspectives are invited to the campus to provide the community with important points of view, some of which may be deemed controversial. The views and opinions of those invited to speak on the campus do not necessarily reflect the views of the university administration or any other segment of the university community.