February 05, 2010

Case Western Reserve Works with
Johnson & Johnson Services, Inc.
to Improve Human Health

Case Western Reserve University has received a $250,000 challenge grant from Johnson & Johnson Services, Inc. through The Johnson & Johnson Corporate Office of Science and Technology (COSAT), and its affiliates. The university will utilize this research grant to support science, medicine and engineering projects to improve human health.

CWRU will match or possibly exceed COSAT's commitment in support of these projects. Applicants for these grants must be affiliated with a CWRU school or department, and preference for funding will be given to interdisciplinary and translational projects. Grants will range in size from $50,000 to $100,000.

"We're pleased to advance interdisciplinary research and development across the campus in key areas of biomedicine," said W. A. "Bud" Baeslack, Case Western Reserve provost.

The translational and commercial perspective at CWRU has been highly accelerated by the university's relationship with the Wallace H. Coulter Foundation. The agreement with COSAT is modeled after the Coulter-Case Translational Research Partnership (CCTRP) process that has been instrumental within the biomedical departments at Case Western Reserve in promoting translational research on campus. Some funds may be used to support new or further accelerate existing CCTRP projects on the pathway to the patient.

For more information contact Kevin Mayhood, 216.368.4442.

Posted by: Kimyette Finley, February 5, 2010 02:16 PM | News Topics: Case School of Engineering, College of Arts and Sciences, Grants, School of Medicine, Technology

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