February 17, 2010

Ardiem Medical Obtains Non-Exclusive License for Neuromodulation Technology Developed
at Case Western Reserve University and the FES Center

Ardiem Medical Inc. has obtained a non-exclusive license to make and sell neuromodulation devices based on intellectual property developed at Case Western Reserve University's Department of Biomedical Engineering and the Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) Center in Cleveland.

The agreement grants Ardiem Medical, a medical devices manufacturer based in Indiana, Pa., rights to intramuscular recording and stimulating electrodes, epimysial recording and stimulating electrodes, spiral cuff peripheral nerve electrodes, and a universal external control unit. Additional details of the agreement were not disclosed.

Technologies first developed for internal research at Case Western Reserve and the FES Center will now be directly available through Ardiem to other researchers working in the neuromodulation field. Neuromodulation is among the fastest growing areas of medicine, involving many diverse specialties.

The 2009 two-volume book "Neuromodulation" explains that the technology's recent advancement has led to rapid growth of the neuromodulation device industry. P. Hunter Peckham, one of the book's editors, is Donnell Institute Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Orthopaedics at CWRU. Peckham serves as the director of the FES Center.

The FES Center is a consortium of three institutions: Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland Louis Stokes Veterans Affairs Medical Center and MetroHealth Medical Center. It leads clinical, educational and technology activities related to restoring function through the use of electrical activation for people with disabilities.

For more information contact Marv Kropko, 216.368.6890.

Posted by: Kimyette Finley, February 17, 2010 10:53 AM | News Topics: Collaborations/Partnerships, Faculty, Research, Technology Transfer

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