April 23, 2010

2010 ADVANCE Opportunity Awards Announced

The Academic Careers in Engineering & Science program (ACES+) recently announced recipients of the 2010 ADVANCE Opportunity Awards. Fourteen proposals representing academic disciplines ranging from engineering to religious studies to sociology received $41,667.

"We're thrilled to have the support of President Barbara R. Snyder and Provost Bud Baeslack to continue these awards," said Lynn Singer, deputy provost and vice president for academic programs. ADVANCE Opportunity Awards also receive funding through the National Science Foundation ADVANCE program.

Advance Opportunity Grants provide small amounts of supplemental support of current or proposed projects and activities where funding is difficult to obtain through other sources. All Case Western Reserve University faculty members are eligible to apply.

According to the Office of the Provost, the following is a list of 2010 ADVANCE Opportunity Award winners and information about their projects:

Alexis Abramson, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Case School of Engineering

Award: $1,771 to support travel to attend and present work at two national conferences.

Karen Beckwith, Department of Political Science, College of Arts and Sciences

Award: $3,258 to develop a database and to purchase statistical software for data collection, coding and analysis for a new project.

Diane M. Bergeron, Department of Organizational Behavior, Weatherhead School of Management

Award: $6,500 to provide summer support for two doctoral research assistants working on a project.

Joy R. Bostic, Department of Religious Studies, College of Arts and Sciences

Award: $3,630 to support research on activism in African American mystical traditions, including travel to investigate original manuscripts, data collection and materials documentation.

Clemens Burda, Department of Chemistry, College of Arts and Sciences

Award: $1,500 to support child care during a three-month research visit during a sabbatical leave.

T. Kenny Fountain, Department of English, College of Arts and Sciences

Award: $1,300 to support a student assistant to aid in transcription and data analysis of audio data for preparation of a book manuscript.

Victor Groza, Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences

Award: $2,800 to support international travel to train interviewers in an ethnosurvey approach to expand an ongoing study.

Gladys Haddad, Western Reserve Studies Symposium, College of Arts and Sciences

Award: $2,000 to seed funding for program design and implementation for the East Cleveland Neighborhood Project.

Charles J. Love, Department of Comprehensive Care, School of Dental Medicine

Award: $1,996 to support travel to an international conference to disseminate research findings.

Heidi B. Martin, Department of Chemical Engineering, Case School of Engineering

Award: $6,000 for short-term funding to support a graduate student stipend for a four-month period.

Heather Morrison, Department of Astronomy, College of Arts and Sciences

Award: $2,000 in travel support to seed a collaboration with researchers from China for a survey project on the Milky Way.

Ronald G. Oldfield, Department of Biology, College of Arts and Sciences

Award: $5,000 to support a research visit to research a publication.

Robert Spadoni, Department of English, College of Arts and Sciences

Award: $505 to support travel to a national society meeting for participation in a panel discussion related to a new book project.

David F. Warner, Department of Sociology, College of Arts and Sciences

Award: $3,407 to support a specialized training course to enable an expanded research project.

For more information contact Kimyette Finley, 216.368.0521.

Posted by: Kimyette Finley, April 23, 2010 08:59 AM | News Topics: Awards, Case School of Engineering, College of Arts and Sciences, Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences, School of Dental Medicine, Weatherhead School of Management

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