August 30, 2010

Team Spirit Powers Case for Community Day

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Beautification is a big part of Case for Community Day.

The Spartan men’s basketball team knows the meaning of teamwork to score on the court.  They will put their muscle power into action by sprucing up the Martin Luther King Jr. Civic Center facility and playground in East Cleveland during the eighth annual Case for Community Day from noon to 4 p.m. on Sept. 17.

“Since 2004, our entire basketball team has participated in Case for Community Day,” said Sean McDonnell, the men’s basketball coach. 

Keeping the tradition alive each year, McDonnell tries to find a project that the players can do as a team.

“Working at the MLK Center will be a tremendous way for our players to connect with our neighbors in East Cleveland,” he said, adding he is proud of the contributions the team has made to the city through their efforts.

The basketball players aren’t alone.  Teams around campus from biomedical engineering, Graduate Student Senate, the law school students and faculty to University Marketing and Communications (UMC) plan to volunteer.

Law students volunteer monthly through Cultivating Connections, an organization at the school dedicated to connecting students to Cleveland by fostering relationships with alumni and lawyers through community service activities. This is the second year the group has volunteered as a team.

According to Katie Arthurs from the Class of 2011, it’s one way for students to connect with the school’s hometown.  During the annual campus day of service, the group will help Providence House, which cares for infants and toddlers.

“We think that Case for Community Day is an amazing opportunity to attain our organization’s goal, while working hand-in-hand with the entire university,” Arthurs said.

Case for Community Day provides an opportunity for graduate and professional students to get out of the labs or the library and engage in a project together, said Christa Wheeler Moss, a biomedical engineering grad student and member of the Graduate Student Senate.  

Moss has worked closely with Latisha James, the director of the Center for Community Partnership, to create a special signup system for graduate and professional students.

After a successful turnout last year and because many of the students enjoy working outdoors, they have focused again on the large Cultural Gardens project. The half-day project holds 75 places open for graduate and professional student volunteers.

Moss also set aside two-hour volunteer slots at the Judson Home to accommodate the rigorous work and lab schedules faced by many graduate and professional students and to encourage more involvement.

Twenty volunteers from UMC will participate in the “Paint Me Happy” project to decorate caps for cancer patients.  The group of graphic artists, designers and writers first used their talents to paint the University Circle RTA station mural two years ago and plan to get out the paint brushes again to help cancer paints undergoing chemotherapy.

"Case for Community Day allows our group to give back to the community in a meaningful way and, at the same time, come together on a creative project," said Glenn Bieler, associate vice president of University Marketing and Communications.

As an office or individually, you can get in touch with your inner volunteer by joining in   Case for Community.

The day kicks off with a program and lunch in Thwing Student Center. After lunch the groups board buses or walk to their assigned projects.

Registration is needed. Visit http://www.case.edu/events/cfc/ for event details.

Posted by: David Wilson, August 30, 2010 02:42 PM | News Topics:

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