CAMPUS NEWS

The University Center on Aging and Health is accepting nominations for the Marie Haug Award, which honors Haug’s pioneering work in aging at Case. This award is presented annually to graduate students who have shown exemplary performance in their gerontological studies. To nominate a graduate student, please submit a nomination letter to by March 30 to sandra.hanson@case.edu.

In light of rising energy costs and continued growth of the campus, the university is identifying diverse ways to maintain its commitment to being a sustainable and environmentally responsible campus. To address these goals, the University’s Energy Advisory Committee (EAC) was formed. The EAC is charged with identifying and assessing conservation opportunities. Please send ideas or questions to energyconservation@case.edu, or visit http://www.case.edu/news/energy.

Case is participating in the Harvest for Hunger campaign throughout the month of March. Visit any one of Bon Appétit’s on-campus locations to make a donation. Donations received will assist more than 100,000 children and families in Cleveland. To learn more about Harvest for Hunger, visit http:www.harvestforhunger.org.

The Kelvin Smith Library announces an online exhibit, “WPA Prints in Special Collections.” The exhibit contains a brief history of the Works Progress Administration Federal Art Programs of the 1930s, as well as a sampling of prints from the KSL Special Collections Department. Go to
http://library.case.edu/ksl/speccoll/exhibits/wpa/wpaEssay.html.

CASE IN THE NEWS

“Pioneer in plastic to be enshrined”

The Plain Dealer, March 21, 2006
http://www.cleveland.com/search/index.ssf?/base/business/1142933652138980.xml?bxbiz&coll=2

In mid-June, at a hotel ballroom in downtown Chicago, Jack Koenig will be immortalized for his contributions to the plastics industry. That’s when the 72-year-old professor emeritus at Case Western Reserve University will be formally inducted into the Plastics Hall of Fame. He and seven other honorees will join the 136 luminaries already enshrined in the 33-year-old hall, which has its home on the second floor of the National Plastics Center & Museum in Leominster, Mass.

“Scientists See Research Value in Salvia”

NPR, All Things Considered, March 20, 2006
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=5290545&ft=1&f=2101136

Parents of teenagers are becoming concerned about an emerging drug of abuse that, until recently, few had ever heard of: Salvia divinorum. Salvia divinorum’s active ingredient, Salvinorin A, is a powerful hallucinogen, “as potent as LSD, and essentially, the most potent naturally occurring hallucinogenic drug,” says Dr. Bryan Roth, a biochemist and neuroscientist at Case Western Reserve University.

“Lax accounting marks end of GM as paragon”

International Herald Tribune, March 21, 2006 (From the New York Times)
http://www.iht.com/articles/2006/03/20/business/gm-5862709.php

There was a time when General Motors was seen as the paragon of financial quality. Its bonds were rated triple-A, and it was known for the most conservative accounting. Let other companies use liberal accounting rules to make results look better. GM did not need such things. The announcement late Thursday that General Motors would revise profit figures for every year of this decade, and would have to restate the 2005 earnings it had already reported, shows how far the icon has fallen. “The question is, what causes this fundamental type of miscalculation to occur?” said Gary Previts, an accounting professor at Case Western Reserve University.

“Financial Failures Lead to Resignation of Case Western's President”

Chronicle of Higher Education, March 24, 2006
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v52/i29/29a03001.htm (paid subscription required )

Inside Adelbert Hall, where senior administrators at Case Western Reserve University go to work each day, a copy of a cartoon hanging in an office is more telling than any of the glossy university brochures neatly displayed throughout the building. It shows two office workers, staring at a computer screen, trying to solve a vexing problem. One says to the other, “If we post a $50-million loss with lots of bright colors and fun graphics, maybe nobody will notice.” Unfortunately, bright colors and fun graphics could not save Edward M. Hundert’s job as the president of the university. Dr. Hundert resigned late last week, effective September 1, after facing three weeks of fierce public criticism about the financial health of the institution.

“Magnet may be cure for our ills”

The Plain Dealer, March 19, 2006
http://www.cleveland.com/search/index.ssf?/base/business/1142674607192320.xml?bxbiz&coll=2

Dr. Michael Weiss used to dream about being able to see how insulin binds to human cells and sometimes gives rise to diabetes.  But since the largest research magnet of its kind was installed in December at the Cleveland Center for Structural Biology, Weiss and his fellow researchers no longer have to dream. The installation of the 900 megahertz nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer represents the end of a more than decade-long effort to put Cleveland in the “top league” of biological imaging research communities, said Paul Carey, the center’s director and a biochemistry professor at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine who was hired in 1994.

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HIGHER ED NEWS

“Public Hearing, Take 2”

Inside Higher Education, March 21, 2006
http://insidehighered.com/news/2006/03/21/commission

With less than five months until the Secretary of Education’s Commission on the Future of Higher Education is set to release its final report to Secretary Margaret Spellings, this much is evident: Commissioners will have no lack of information, no shortage of opinions and no scarcity of student anecdotes from which to draw. Spellings announced the creation of the panel last fall to confront a range of hot-button issues in academe.

“N.Y.U. and Columbia to Receive $200 Million Gifts for Research”

New York Times, March 21m 2006
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/03/21/education/21gift.html

New York University and Columbia have each received donations of about $200 million, among the largest to academic institutions in recent years. The gifts, from different donors, come as both universities try to compete with rivals that have far larger endowments.

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EVENTS

The College Scholars Program is sponsoring several lectures throughout the semester. “Our Changing Ethics of Life and Death” takes place today at 4 p.m. in Ford Auditorium, and “Mythology and Medical Ethics: The Cases of Cloning and Transplants” takes place on April 11 at 4 p.m. in Ford Auditorium. For details go to http://www.case.edu/artsci/scholars/.

Case’s gospel choir, Voices of Glory, presents “Through Hard Trials & Tribulations” on March 25 at 7 p.m. in Thwing Ballroom. The performance is a benefit for a family that was displaced to Cleveland after Hurricane Katrina.  Tickets are $7, and all proceeds benefit the family. The concert will be comprised of the Voices of Glory, several other choirs, and praise dancers. Contact danisa.clarrett@case.edu.

The LGBT Faculty and Staff Organization at Case invites the campus community to a lecture by visiting gay scholar Horacio N. Roque Ramirez, from the department of Chicana and Chicano Studies at University of California-Santa Barbara, on March 23 from noon to 1:30 p.m. at the MSASS building, room 320 BC. His teaching and interdisciplinary research draws on history, ethnography, anthropology, and sociology.

The Case Chapter of the American Constitution Society will hold its annual Political Process Lecture at the Law School on March 23 at 4 p.m. in A59. The speaker is Geoffrey Stone of the University of Chicago Law School, who will discuss “Civil Liberties in Wartime.” 

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FOR FACULTY AND STAFF

Higher Education for Development (HED), in cooperation with USAID/Mexico, is accepting applications for the U.S. - Mexico Training, Internships, Exchanges, and Scholarships (TIES) Partnership Initiative. For this RFA, HED anticipates recommending approximately ten awards of up to $300,000 each. The deadline for receipt of applications is June 2, and information can be found at http://www.hedprogram.org/ .

Nominations are now being accepted for the Frank and Dorothy Humel Hovorka Prize, which recognizes exceptional achievement by an active or emeritus member of the faculty. The Hovorka Prize is conferred at the university’s annual commencement convocation, and includes a monetary award of $5,000. Any member of the university community may submit one or more nominations in letter form, each not to exceed two pages in length.  Correspondence should be e-mailed to lois.langell@case.edu by April 7.

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FOR STUDENTS

Alpha Phi Omega and Case EMS are sponsoring a Run/Walk on April 8 to benefit the National Marfan Foundation. Marfan Syndrome is a life-threatening connective tissue disorder that affects 1 in 10,000 individuals. The race begins at 11 a.m. To register go to http://apo.case.edu. For more information about Marfan Syndrome visit http://www.marfan.org.

Campus Dining Services and Bon Appetit invite the campus community to observe Passover at the Halal/Kosher Countertop adjacent to the Leutner Dining Hall. While current Hala/Kosher meal plan participants already have access to all Passover meals, other meal plan holders can upgrade their meal plans to include access to these Passover-certified meals during the holiday. Sign up in the Meal Plan Office, Crawford Room 12, by March 31.

Representatives from Herff Jones and Balfour will take orders for college rings at the University Bookstore during the Grad Fair today and tomorrow. To order personalized announcements, see the Herff Jones representative or pick up an announcement order form at the bookstore. Also, diploma frames can be purchased at the bookstore before, during and after the Grad Fair. For information go to http://case.bkstore.com.

The Jewish Student Group and the Russian Club invite the campus community to a celebration of the Purim holiday on March 23 at 9 p.m. at the Guilford Lounge.  For information contact eric.navok@case.edu.

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PERSONNEL

Joseph Anderson recently joined the university as a technician with the Animal Resource Center.

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ACCOLADES

Diane Ferris, manager of the University Center on Aging and Health, retired after 45 years of service to the university and the Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing. The Center has served as the focal point at Case Western Reserve University for building and maintaining excellence in gerontological and geriatric research, education, and practice.