CAMPUS NEWS

The Adelbert Road Bridge is scheduled to reopen on Friday, December 22, dependent upon weather conditions. The Cornell Road Bridge Replacement project will then commence. The Cornell Road Bridge will be closed to vehicular traffic as soon as the Adelbert Road Bridge opens. It is the section above the railroad tracks between Murray Hill and Circle Drive. Pedestrian traffic will be maintained on the Cornell Road Bridge. The long-term project is expected to take two to three years to complete. The university's Campus Services will provide updates as appropriate.

As part of the university's ongoing initiatives to conserve energy, the Department of Facilities Services will be reducing heat, ventilation and lighting levels over the two university holidays, Christmas and New Year's. To view a list of the dates, times and buildings affected, go to http://www.case.edu/finadmin/plantsrv/holiday2006.pdf. Questions should be directed to the customer service center for Facility Operations at 368-2580.

During winter break, Veale Center and Adelbert Gym will be open 8 a.m. until 8 p.m., Monday through Friday. The buildings will be closed Saturdays and Sundays, along with December 25, 26, 29, and January 1 and 15. Open swim hours will be 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 4-6 p.m., Monday through Friday. All other outdoor facilities will be open dawn until dusk.

Chaplain Julia Brown of the Department of Biology is accepting donations for distribution to women housed in the Hitchcock Shelter during this holiday season. Donations can be in the form of personal items, gift baskets, and sponsorship for gift baskets/items. The shelter visit will take place on Friday, December 22. For further information or to help distribute items, please contact julia.brown@case.edu.

The School of Dental Medicine is sponsoring a collection of new unwrapped toys to benefit Toys for Tots. Please drop off donations to Room 1400 at the dental school by December 20 or call Tori Hirsch at 368-6982 to arrange for pick up.

CASE IN THE NEWS

Lawmakers grapple with will of the people

Canton Repository, December 18, 2006
http://www.cantonrep.com/index.php?ID=325484&Category=13

Last week, the hot-button topic at the Statehouse was not minimum wage or gun control. It was the people's will. Gov. Bob Taft issued the most significant veto of his tenure in an effort to protect local gun laws, and a university poll showed 56 percent of voters were on his side. Then the Legislature overrode his veto. Joseph White of Cleveland's Case Western Reserve University said voters should not be surprised, however, when lawmakers defy majority opinion -- or even the majority opinion within their own party.

Latest editions

BBC World Service, December 14, 2006
http://www.theworld.org/?q=taxonomy_by_date/1/20061214

A radio link features Amos Guiora, law professor and director of the Institute for Global Security Law and Policy at Case Western Reserve Univesity. Guiora, a retired lieutenant colonel in the Israeli defense forces, spoke with the BBC about the recent Supreme Court ruling on so-called "targeted killings."

Teen tummies trimmed

WNYC, December 18, 2006
http://www.wnyc.org/news/articles/70744

As the national waistline grows larger, more people are choosing to make their stomachs smaller. They're undergoing bariatric surgery, a category of various operations to reduce the size of the stomach or bypass it entirely. People feel full faster, eat less, and take on fewer calories. A growing proportion of these patients are teenagers. Nutritional expert Paul Ernsberger doesn't think that's a good enough reason to go under the knife. The Case Western Reserve University medical school professor thinks the risks are too high for people to think of obesity surgery like they would breast implants or liposuction.

Pollock paintings not so easy to spot

San Francisco Chronicle, December 18, 2006
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?
f=/n/a/2006/12/18/entertainment/e141023S87.DTL

Finding a Jackson Pollock painting is the art world's equivalent of a winning lottery ticket. But proving a Pollock painting's authenticity isn't easy, which is why physicist Richard Taylor's theory that the famed artist's work can be identified using fractals has stirred such interest and controversy. "I firmly believe his analysis is seriously flawed," said Kate Jones-Smith, a third-year doctoral student in physics at Case Western Reserve University.

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HIGHER ED NEWS

Women in science: The battle moves to the trenches

New York Times, December 19, 2006
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/12/19/
science/19women.html?_r=1&oref=slogin

Since the 1970s, women have surged into science and engineering classes in larger and larger numbers, even at top-tier institutions like the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where half the undergraduate science majors and more than a third of the engineering students are women. Half of the nation's medical students are women, and for decades the numbers have been rising similarly in disciplines like biology and mathematics. Yet studies show that women in science still routinely receive less research support than their male colleagues, and they have not reached the top academic ranks in numbers anything like their growing presence would suggest.

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EVENTS

Renowned British group Hilliard Ensemble will perform "Fortuna desperate: English & Italian Songs & Madrigals," at 3 p.m., January 28, for the Chapel, Court & Countryside: Early Music at Harkness series. Called "the Rolls Royce of vocal ensembles," this male vocal ensemble performs the great works of the Medieval, Renaissance, and contemporary periods. For ticket prices and additional information, call 368-2402, or go to http://music.case.edu/ccc/.

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FOR FACULTY AND STAFF

Reminder: Today is the Adelbert Hall Holiday Open House. The festivities take place from 3:30-5:30 p.m. in Adelbert Hall.

From January 1 to July 1, 2007, Case's faculty diversity specialist, Amanda Shaffer, will be the faculty contact for information regarding faculty affirmative action paperwork and questions. She is also available for information and questions regarding faculty searches, recruitment and retention of faculty, how to recruit women and under-represented minorities to apply for faculty positions, and how to mitigate bias in the search process. Affirmative action paperwork should still be sent to the Office of Equal Opportunity, 310 Adelbert Hall, fax (216) 368-8878. For more information, send e-mail to amanda.shaffer@case.edu.

The PeopleSoft HCM team has added the following enhancement to employee self-service: Effective immediately, employees can now update their business phone using the HCM Self-Service Module. The navigation is as follows: Employee Self-Service, Personal Information, Personal Information Home, Phone Numbers, Business. Details about PeopleSoft HCM: http://www.case.edu/projects/erp/Information.html.

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FOR STUDENTS

The Springfest committee will be holding its annual logo contest to design the 2007 Springfest logo over winter break. The prize is $100. The committee will use the logo for T-shirts and advertisements. More details are on the Springfest Web site at http://springfest.case.edu. Submissions due January 19, 2007.

Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority is sponsoring a Teddy Bear Drive through December 20. Donate new or gently used stuffed animals. Donation boxes are in Clarke Tower, Village Houses 2, 4, 5, and 7, Norton House, Tippit House, and the Office of Multicultural Affairs in the Sears Building. All donations will be given to Toys for Tots.

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PERSONNEL

Mandhapati Raju recently joined the university as a research associate in the mechanical aerospace and engineering department.

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ACCOLADES

Grace F. Brody, associate professor emerita of the Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences, recently donated a $1.5 million gift to the Mandel School to endow and create the new Grace F. Brody Professor of Parent-Child Studies, which will help future social workers build family relations between children and their caregivers. The professorship honors the retired faculty member, who dedicated 20 years of teaching and service to the school in the area of family development and child rearing.