CAMPUS NEWS

Beginning today, Tuesday, January 16, utility work will begin along the south side of Euclid Avenue from Adelbert Road west to East 107th Street. A roaming work zone will be implemented throughout the project area. Traffic signs and arrow boards will be posted. This is the first phase of the Euclid Avenue Corridor Project work in University Circle. Further updates will be provided in Case Daily throughout the project.

The Office of the President invites interested Case faculty, staff and students to submit essays for the 2007 Martin Luther King Jr. Essay Contest. The submission deadline is February 1. Full details are available online at http://www.case.edu/events/mlk/essays/index.html.

Come to the ITS Open Forum to hear the latest on ITS initiatives. Forum takes place from 11:30 a.m. to noon on Thursday, January 18 in Adelbert Hall, Toepfer Room. Immediately following, representatives from Dell Computer will discuss its current and future offerings of desktops, laptops and printers from noon to 1:30 p.m.

The American Red Cross and University Hospitals will hold a blood drive at the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. Interested persons will have two opportunities to donate: From noon to 6 p.m. today, January 16, in the Student Lounge on the fourth floor of the Robbins Building and from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday, January 26 in the Rainbow Performance Area of University Hospitals Case Medical Center.

CASE IN THE NEWS

Letter to the editor

Crain's Cleveland Business, January 15, 2007 (subscription required)
http://www.crainscleveland.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?
AID=/20070115/SUB/70112013&SearchID=73269232973693

Gregory L. Eastwood, M.D., interim president of Case Western Reserve University, wrote a letter to the editor regarding a year-end article that included a quote about the university: '"CWRU is like the bastard child at the family reunion, not really very popular with any of the old folks."' That was your selection for the Quote of the Year on page 19 of the January 8, 2007 issue, attributed to Case Western Reserve University alumnus Paul Miller in a February 20, 2006, story. Although that depiction of Case Western Reserve University is nearly a year out of date, to characterize the university in that fashion is, frankly, galling. One can argue whether such a depiction was accurate a year ago, sensationally sophomoric, or simply mean-spirited. Regardless, it does not describe the region's major research university today.

First womb transplant in U.S. planned

Boston Globe, January 16, 2007
http://www.boston.com/news/nation/washington/articles
/2007/01/16/first_womb_transplant_in_us_planned/

First came kidney, liver and heart transplants. Then a few doctors started transplanting hands. French surgeons even did a face. Now, doctors are planning the first womb transplant in the United States. "Organs can have tremendous symbolic meaning to people. It can vary from individual to individual and culture to culture," said Stuart Youngner, a bioethicist at Case Western Reserve University.

Swagelok to market super stainless steel

The Plain Dealer, January 16, 2007
http://www.cleveland.com/plaindealer/stories/index.ssf?
/base/business/116894014239640.xml&coll=2

Swagelok Co. is preparing to market what it calls a breakthrough metallurgical technology that could make high-carbon, high-performance stainless steel. The Solon-based manufacturer of valves, fittings and other fluid-system components said Monday that it has formed a subsidiary to commercialize a stainless steel heat-treating process it has used since 2000. Swagelok has long partnered with Case Western Reserve University.

Legal expert wonders about 'ethnic cleansing' of Iraq

Crain's Cleveland Business, January 12, 2007
http://www.crainscleveland.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070112/FREE/70112025/1008

Sure, the Saddam Hussein trial and execution was a mess, but Case Western Reserve University law professor Michael Scharf believes the United States could have a bigger problem on its hands. Speaking at a City Club luncheon recently, Scharf, an expert in war crime tribunals, said he fears the United States will get itself into a whole new world of trouble if it sides with the Shiites and the Kurds while trying to secure Iraq.

Study might help with cancer

Louisville Courier-Journal, January 15, 2007
http://www.courier-journal.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070115/NEWS01/70115015

A University of Kentucky researcher has found and mapped a gene that helps determine the number of adult stem cells in bone marrow -- a discovery that promises to help cancer patients in the future. Stan Gerson, director of the National Center for Regenerative Medicine, said Van Zant has been doing significant work in the world of adult stem cells and that his current research is the latest example. "I would say it's an important breakthrough," said Gerson, whose center is a partnership of Case Western Reserve University, the Cleveland Clinic Foundation, and University Hospitals of Cleveland.

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HIGHER ED NEWS

The new size of critical mass

Inside Higher Ed, January 16, 2007
http://insidehighered.com/news/2007/01/16/rochester

In recent years, many liberal arts colleges have inched upwards in size, with student bodies that were once 1,200 hitting 1,500. Officials cite a number of reasons -- both educational and economic -- for why the smaller sizes don't work as they once did. Now it appears that similar growth spurts are hitting research universities that are on the small side for that sector.

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EVENTS

For a list of events and activities on campus and in the community today, refer to http://www.case.edu/webdev/webevent/calendar.htm and http://www.universitycircle.org/content/.

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FOR FACULTY AND STAFF

As part of the university's commitment to the development of women leaders at the university, applications are now being accepted for financial support for attendance at the 2007 Bryn Mawr Summer Institute for Women in Higher Education Administration, being held June 23 through July 18. Submit applications for funding by January 19 to Associate Provost Kathryn Karipides, Office of the Provost, 216 Adelbert Hall, LC: 7001. Detailed information about the program is available at http://www.case.edu/provost/comm/121306.html.

Act III, Roundtable, a group for women of retirement age, will meet from 4-5:30 p.m. Thursday, January 18 in the Flora Stone Mather Center for Women in Thwing Center, Room 309. All are invited to come any time. Refreshments are served. To be added to the Act III distribution list, send e-mail to centerforwomen@case.edu.

Supervisors who have not attended the information sessions for the Supervisory Education and Excellence Development (SEED) program, will have a final opportunity to do so on Wednesday, January 24. Session will be from 1:30-2:30 p.m. in Crawford Hall, Room 209. All supervisors are encouraged to attend this session to learn more about the seminars, requirements for participation and exciting program incentives. For more information, refer to http://www.case.edu/finadmin/humres/pdf/SEED.Flyer.pdf and to register e-mail to fatima.karriem@case.edu.

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FOR STUDENTS

Murray Hill Residential College will host a post-new year's party from 10 p.m. to 2 a.m. on Thursday, January 18, in Carlton Commons located on Top of the Hill. The campus is welcome to attend.

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PERSONNEL

Bin Dong recently joined the university as a research associate in the macromolecular science and engineering department.

Douglas Mickler recently joined the Case Police and Security Services as a police officer.

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ACCOLADES

Case Western Reserve University's School of Dental Medicine, in partnership with the Case School of Medicine, will begin offering a dual D.M.D.-M.D. program next year. The program enables students to graduate from Case with both the medical and dental degrees in five years. Although other schools have attempted to establish similar programs, this is the first in the country to offer a dual degree for students pursuing studies to become general dentists.