Dexter, the Engineering School's Autonomous Vehicle, on Display at Auto Show

dexter.jpg The Case School of Engineering (CSE) has responded to a national challenge issued by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA): create a robotic car that can function without a driver and interact with and maneuver through traffic and other obstacles. More than 50 CSE faculty, students and industrial collaborators have been designing and creating such a vehicle, which they've named Dexter. Get a glimpse of Dexter during the Cleveland Auto Show, February 24 to March 4 at the I-X Center. Later Dexter will compete in the DARPA 2007 Grand Urban Challenge, an event to show the possibilities for autonomous ground vehicles used by the military in important defense missions. Qualifying events will begin in October, with the final challenge on November 3. The top three finishers will receive $2 million, with $1 million and $500,000 for second- and third-place finishers. To learn more about Team Case and Dexter or to donate to the project visit their Web site or e-mail caseurbanchallenge@case.edu.

Campus News

Join the Weatherhead School of Management on Wednesday, February 28 for a Bold Thinkers event featuring Thomas Modly, deputy under secretary of defense for financial management, who will talk about the challenges of transformation and change in the government given the changing nature of business and national security. The event will be 4-5 p.m. at the George S. Dively Building. Register online or by calling 216-368-6413. Read more.

For Faculty & Staff

The Center for Policy Studies will host a panel discussion on "What Can the New Governor Do? A Discussion of Prospects for the Strickland Administration," from 4:30-6 p.m. Monday, February 26 in Ford Auditorium of the Allen Memorial Medical Library. For a list of panelists and other details visit the Center for Policy Studies Web site.

For Students

The Case Cooperative Circle sponsors "Let's Talk," from 1-3 p.m. Sunday, February 25 in Bellflower lounge. Session will focus on campuswide interfaith relationships. Open to all.

Spectrum and Case's University Programming Board are hosting the "Sex Workers' Art Show" beginning at 8 p.m., February 26, in Thwing Center ballroom. The show features visual and performance art created by people who work in the sex industry. Admission is free for Case, CIM and CIA students with student ID. A limited number of tickets will be sold to faculty, staff and the public for $7 each. Buy tickets online.

Events

Today, February 23, from 12:30-2 p.m., all interested members of the Case community are invited to the Sierra Club's fun and interactive "Sex and the Environment" workshop. Learn how the reproductive health and rights and environmental movements can be united. The event will take place in the Guilford House lounge. Additional information is available on the Sierra Club's Web site.

"The Meaning of American Freedom" is the topic of a free public address by Columbia University's Eric Foner, who specializes in the Civil War and Reconstruction, slavery, and 19th-century America. Hear Foner at 7 p.m. March 6 in Ford Auditorium of the Allen Memorial Medical Library. Book signing will follow in the SAGES café in Crawford Hall, first floor. Learn more.

For a list of other events and activities on campus and in the community today, refer to http://www.case.edu/webdev/webevent/calendar.htm.

February 23, 2007

A daily newsletter published by the Office of Marketing & Communications, Case Western Reserve University. Submit items for inclusion to: case-daily@case.edu

Case in the News

Cutbacks disrupt Alzheimer registry

The Plain Dealer, Feb. 23, 2007
Peter Whitehouse, professor of neurology and director of the University Memory and Aging Center, a partnership with Case Western Reserve University and the University Hospitals Case Medical Center, talks about the challenges the center faces, including securing funds, maintaining a registry and tissue bank of Alzheimer's patients and attracting scientist to the center.

HIGHER ED NEWS

A defense of standardized tests

Inside Higher Ed, Feb. 23, 2007
An analysis finds that standardized tests predict success in graduate and professional schools better than do college grades. The journal Science released a study Thursday to support the reliability of these tests.

Other Events

All Events >>

S

M

T

W

T

F

S

 

 

 

 

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28