Case Western Reserve to Co-Host Workshop that Will Explore Technical Solutions for Present Energy Issues

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Case Western Reserve University will host a one and a half day workshop that will explore the technological solutions for reliable electricity storage, the effective integration of renewable energy, and national grid security on Monday and Tuesday, October 20-21, at 8 a.m. (both days), in Nord Hall.

"Materials for Next-Generation Energy Storage: Challenge for Cost-Effective Scientific and Technical Innovation" is being co-sponsored by the university's Great Lakes Institute for Energy Innovation, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Energy Voyager.

Two important, anticipated outcomes of the workshop will be an "Innovation Road Map" and the beginning of an International Expert Knowledge Community, composed of energy leaders who are working at the frontier of distributed storage, materials science and the smart grid, says J. Iwan D. Alexander, faculty director of the Great Lakes Institute for Energy Innovation and professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at the Case School of Engineering. Read more.

University to Test Emergency Communications Systems October 22

To help ensure timely, accurate and clear communication takes place with members of the Case Western Reserve University community during a potential crisis, the Communications Committee of the university's Security Task Force is testing the university's layered emergency notification network, commonly referred to as the CaseWARN communications system.

The test, which will include voice mail, text messages and outdoor speakers, will take place during business hours Wednesday, October 22.

All members of the campus community who have subscribed to the CaseWARN voice or text alerts will receive a test message on that day. No response is necessary. In addition, all outdoor speakers around campus will be sounded at this same time, first with an alarm then with a voice message that the alarm is only a test.

Prior to the testing, those who have subscribed to the CaseWARN voice or text message alerts need to program two numbers into their cell phones: 24639 should be entered as CaseWARN Text and 1-866-609-8026 as CaseWARN Voice. Details are available online. E-mail questions to case-news@case.edu.

The university recommends all faculty, staff and students subscribe to the voice and text message alerts, which will only be used in the case of an imminent threat to the campus community.

Campus News

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Case Western Reserve University President Barbara R. Snyder and other university officials will meet with Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) and Congresswoman Betty Sutton (D-OH) today on campus to discuss the Great Lakes Institute for Energy Innovation. The Institute is a multi-disciplinary center led by researchers at the Case School of Engineering. The Institute builds on three primary areas of activity: Research and development, economic development and education.

Throughout the month of October, students in several graduate and professional programs at Case Western Reserve are collecting non-perishable food items to help fight hunger in Northeast Ohio. The OktoberFeast campaign, sponsored by the Weatherhead Graduate Business Student Association, will feature a number of events benefiting the Cleveland Foodbank. A volunteer event at the Cleveland Foodbank will take place 9-11:30 a.m., Friday, October 17. To participate, RSVP to Sarah Abbott by October 16. Another event, the Weatherheadless Ball, will take place 7:30 p.m. to 1 a.m., Friday, October 31, at the Peter B. Lewis (PBL) Building. Free to attend. Voluntary food donations will be accepted at the door. Must be 21 or older to attend. In addition, the School of Law, the Mandel Center for Nonprofit Organizations, the Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing and School of Medicine is joining in the Oktoberfeast campaign. Food bins will be located at the law school outside the SBA office; at the School of Medicine near rooms E-301 and E-401; and at the management school in the PBL, Room 150.

For Faculty and Staff

The University Center for Innovation in Teaching and Education (UCITE) is hosting a discussion on "Getting and Using Student Feedback" from noon to 1 p.m., Thursday, October 16, in the Allen Memorial Medical Library's Herrick Room. The session will focus on taking stock of how well courses are going and making any corrections that may be needed. Pizza and beverages will be served. RSVP to UCITE.

Faculty and staff are invited to submit proposals for the University System of Ohio's Learning, Libraries & Technology 2009 Conference. The University System of Ohio seeks interactive and engaging proposals for presentations, pre-conference workshops and technology demonstrations by Wednesday, October 15. Learn more.

For Students

KATwalk, sponsored by Kappa Alpha Theta Sorority, will take place beginning at 8 p.m., Friday, October 24, at Carlton Commons. Students are invited to get a team of friends together to participate in the fashion/music show. Teams can enter for $35. The proceeds will benefit the Court Appointed Special Advocates program, which protects the legal rights of abused and neglected children. Teams should submit their entry forms by Friday, October 17. Learn more.

The Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences is again offering its award-winning International Study/Travel three-credit hour courses. This year, six courses are being offered to undergraduate and graduate students. The program will head to Bangladesh, El Salvador, Israel, the Netherlands, Guatemala and China. There are no prerequisites or language requirements, and financial aid is available. Learn more at several upcoming information sessions being held at the Mandel School: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., Thursday, October 16, Room 108; 12:45-1:45 p.m., Thursday, October 23, Room 222; and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 4-7 p.m., Tuesday, October 28, Room 108. For more information, contact Deborah R. Jacobson, the program's director, at 368-6014.

Events

The Case Western Reserve University M.F.A. Acting Program with The Cleveland Play House (CPH) will present Tony Kushner's Pulitzer Prize-winning play Angels in America: Millennium Approaches, October 15-25, in the CPH's Brooks Theatre. Tickets are $15 for adults and $7.50 for students with a valid ID. Angels in America: Perestroika will be presented as a staged reading at 8 p.m., Friday, October 31, in the Brooks Theatre. Tickets are $30 per person; the reading is a benefit performance for the M.F.A Acting Program. Tickets are on sale now at The Cleveland Play House box office by calling (216) 795-7000, Ext. 4 or online.

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From 4:30-6 p.m. today at the Inamori Center, panelists from the GreenCityBlueLake Institute of the Cleveland Museum of Natural History, Case Western Reserve's sustainability program, the new Sustainability Student Council, and Delta Tau Delta Fraternity will provide big picture and case study perspectives of how climate issues affect the economy, health and quality of life in Northeast Ohio. In addition, the panel will discuss initiatives in Cleveland and on campus that are making a difference.

The Case Western Reserve University School of Law's Frederick K. Cox International Law Center presents The Orange Chronicles, a documentary about the 2004 Orange Revolution in Ukraine, at 6:15 p.m. this evening, at the School of Law's Gund Hall, Room 157. Hosted by Timothy Casey, assistant professor of law, the documentary is part of the International Human Rights Film Series. Free, open to the public. Food and beverages will be served.

The Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine is hosting its Mini Med School program from 6:30-8:30 p.m. on five consecutive Wednesdays, beginning October 15. The program is open to all who are interested in health research and trends, and is taught in a style that those without a medical background will understand. The entire series costs $100. Learn more about specific topics and registration.

The Case Center for Reducing Health Disparities is hosting Meredith Minkler, who will discuss her experience in community-based participatory research in her lecture, "Collaborative Research with Communities: Challenges and Opportunities for Addressing Health Disparities," from 12:30-2 p.m., Wednesday, October 15, at MetroHealth Medical Center, Rammelkamp Building R240. Minkler is a professor and director of health and social behavior at the School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, and she has over 30 years experience in developing and implementing community partnerships and community-based participatory research. Refreshments will be provided. For more information, contact Sabina Hossain.

The views and opinions of those invited to speak on campus do not necessarily reflect the views of the university administration or any other segment of the university community.

October 14, 2008

A daily newsletter published by the Office of Marketing & Communications, Case Western Reserve University. Submit items for inclusion to: case-daily@case.edu.

Year of Darwin

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Case Western Reserve University continues its yearlong series of events celebrating Charles Darwin's life, his work and the diverse ways in which evolutionary theory has impacted research at 4:30 p.m., Thursday, October 16 at the School of Law, Moot Court Room. Edward J. Larson of Pepperdine University will speak on the topic of "From Dayton to Dover: A History of the Evolution Teaching Legal Controversy in America." Learn more.

Case in the News

In credit crisis, some turn to online peers for cash

New York Times, October 14, 2008
While conventional credit markets have frozen, imperiling the entire economy, one nontraditional lending source has become hotter: peer-to-peer lending (p2p). Devin Pope, an economist at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, and Justin Sydnor, assistant professor of economics at Case Western Reserve University, have studied the efficiency of p2p lending.

Vitamin D supplementation guidelines for youngsters doubled

Washington Post, October 13, 2008
The leading children's medical organization in the United States on Monday announced that it has doubled the amount of vitamin D recommended for infants, children and adolescents. Nora G. Singer, a pediatric rheumatologist at Case Western Reserve University, comments.

Environmental illnesses are gaining attention, thanks to the 'green' movement

The Plain Dealer, October 14, 2008
Many people suffer from environmental illnesses or chemical sensitivities. The difficulty for clinicians and health-care providers is figuring out how to take that information and help individual people, said Kathleen Fagan of the Swetland Center for Environmental Health at Case Western Reserve University's School of Medicine.

Dark energy: the quest for galaxies

Nature.com, October 13, 2008
Astronomers searching for evidence of the mysterious energy that is speeding up the expansion of the Universe have discovered three new galaxy clusters. They used a microwave survey technique that could rival existing ways of searching for dark energy. John Ruhl, professor of physics and astronomy at Case Western Reserve University, comments.

Park system aims for stars with purchase

The News-Herald, October 10, 2008
The Geauga Park District aimed for the stars and bought Case Western Reserve University's Nassau Astronomical Station observatory in Montville Township.

Case Western Reserve sports news and notes

The Plain Dealer, October 13, 2008
Both Case Western Reserve University cross country teams claimed Division III team titles this past weekend at the All-Ohio Championships at Ohio Wesleyan University in Delaware, Ohio.

Higher Ed News

Analysis: Economy puts colleges' ambitions on hold

USA TODAY, October 13, 2008
The financial meltdown is forcing higher education institutions to tear up budget plans and prepare for a simultaneous hit to their three major revenue sources—government funding, donations and tuition. At the same time, they're having to find more money for one of their major budget items—financial aid—or risk seeing students drop out.