Case School of Engineering to Build
Nitinol Research and Education Specialty

Scientists have created quirky materials like Nitinol, which changes its shape under hot and cold temperatures and then remembers its original form when it returns to its beginning temperature. Nitinol, which is primarily nickel and titanium, is known as a shape memory alloy.

Since discovery in 1962, engineers have been finding an increasing number of new and significant applications for shape memory alloys in fields as different as medicine and aerospace.

The Case School of Engineering will learn more about the sophisticated metallurgical processing and characterization with $1.2 million to purchase a range of new instruments to add to their research tools.

These new tools are supported by funding the Nitinol Commercialization Accelerator—a $3-million local collaboration—funded by the Ohio Third Frontier Wright Projects Program. Read more.

Campus News

Off-campus vendors were scheduled to receive their new terminals yesterday. This means that off-campus vendors will begin accepting the CaseCard again beginning today. Contact Dennis Drew at 368-5844 with questions.

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The SAGES Café will offer Peet's Guatemalan Blend the week of July 20. The coffee is from Finca Santa Isabel in Guatemala.



The American Cancer Society's Third Annual Pan Ohio Hope Ride will take place July 30 through August 2. The event will take bicyclists across the state to raise awareness and money to support the operations of the Hope Lodges in Cleveland and Cincinnati, and a future one in Columbus. Riders will be staying on the Case Western Reserve campus the night of July 29, and there are multiple opportunities to volunteer for activities on campus and at the Hope Lodge for the ride's kickoff celebration. Hope Lodge provides free housing for cancer patients and their families while undergoing treatment away from home. Contact Paul Purdy at 888-227-6446 extension 1222 or by e-mail at panohioinfo@cancer.org if interested in volunteering.

For Faculty and Staff

In an effort to support the university's sustainability program, Distribution Services is no longer offering FedEx paper airbills to customers. The department has established online shipping with FedEx, which will enable the processing of shipments online, completing customs documents, and downloading shipment reports. Departments interested in obtaining FedEx online shipping abilities should call Darlene Hall at 368-2565 or Crystal Campbell at 368-1354.

For Students

The Writing Resource Center (WRC) is open for summer sessions through July 26. Hours are Tuesday through Thursday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. All appointments will be held in Bellflower Hall 104. Go online to make an appointment, or send an e-mail to writingcenter@case.edu with questions.

Events

The annual Party on the Quad will take place from 3 to 6 p.m., Friday, July 24. The event is designed to bring faculty, staff, and students together. Festivities will include trivia, corn hole, and karaoke contests. Bratwurst, hamburgers, veggie burgers, cookies, and ice cream, courtesy of Bon Appétit, will be served to those with a Case Western Reserve ID. Sponsored by the Department of Human Resources and the Staff Advisory Council.

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WOW!: Wade Oval Wednesdays, an evening of free concerts in University Circle, takes place from 6 to 9 p.m. each Wednesday through August 26. This evening's event will feature the Irish folk and Celtic sounds of the New Barleycorn. WOW! also features food from local restaurants and artwork by local artisans. Rain site: The large tent on Wade Oval.

The views and opinions of those invited to speak on campus do not necessarily reflect the views of the university administration or any other segment of the university community.

July 15, 2009

A daily newsletter published by the Office of Marketing & Communications, Case Western Reserve University. Submit items for inclusion to: case-daily@case.edu.

Case in the News

$1.85M grant to study blocking oral bacteria from damaging pregnancy

MedCity News, July 12, 2009
A researcher at the Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine will use a $1.85 million grant to study how to block oral bacteria from reaching and harming an unborn child—a path she's linked to prenatal problems. Yiping Han's focus is on fusobacterium nucleatum and a specific molecule, FadA, that may trigger a process that lets the bacterium enter and spread within a woman's placenta during birth.

Study: British girl's damaged heart heals itself a decade after doctors give her second heart

Los Angeles Times, July 14, 2009
British doctors designed a radical solution to save a girl with major heart problems in 1995: they implanted a donor heart directly onto her own failing heart. After 10 years with two blood pumping organs, Hannah Clark's faulty one did what many experts had thought impossible: it healed itself enough so that doctors could remove the donated heart. Ileana Pina, a heart failure expert at Case Western Reserve University, comments.

Analysts examine second day of Sotomayor hearings

The Online NewsHour (PBS), July 14, 2009
Judge Sonia Sotomayor faced questions on past rulings and statements during her second day of Supreme Court confirmation hearings Tuesday. Legal analysts—including Jonathan Adler, professor of law at Case Western Reserve University—examine her responses.

Change in health care system? It is necessary

Yakima Herald-Republic, July 12, 2009
An editorial on national health care coverage references the Health Matrix Journal of Law-Medicine, which is produced by students at the Case Western Reserve University School of Law.

Books 101: where are the bookstores in Cleveland, Ohio?

Examiner Cleveland, July 14, 2009
The city of Cleveland is packed with things to do, and bookstores are certainly not neglected. Appletree Books is owned by Jane Kessler, a retired Case Western Reserve University professor.

Higher Ed News

Should more try for 3-year college degree?

USA TODAY, July 14, 2009
While educators debate the wisdom of three-year college degrees, some ambitious students are going ahead and finishing their coursework in three years anyhow as a way to save thousands of dollars in tuition.