Case Western Reserve biomed professor among panel of national translational medicine experts

Erin LavikErin Lavik, a faculty member in Case Western Reserve University's Department of Biomedical Engineering, appears in Washington, D.C. this evening as part of a national discussion regarding translational medicine.

Lavik, who came to Case Western Reserve this summer from Yale University, will share details of her pioneering use of microspheres to deliver essential medication to glaucoma patients. Lavik is speaking as part of a “salon” sponsored by the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the publisher of the journal Science, among many other activities.

Elias Zerhouni, former director of the National Institutes of Health, is moderating the event, which also features Hal Dietz, the Victor A. McKusick Professor of Medicine and Genetics at Johns Hopkins University. Dietz is an investigator with the Howard Hughes Medicine Institute and a member of the Institute of Medicine. He is known for his research on genetic factors that contribute to aortic aneurisms and other symptoms of cardiovascular disease.

Lavik has been recognized as a rising academic star by national organizations and publications such as MIT’s Technology Review and Wired. She also has conducted extensive work in the area of tissue scaffording to create new structures for the repair of spinal cord injury. More recently she has explored ways to develop synthetic platelets to stop bleeding after injury.

Treu-Mart Fellows Give Back to Community

benhughes.jpg

Editor's note: The Treu-Mart Youth Development Fellowship provides support and professional development for professionals who work with youths during non-school hours. Case Daily will share a few of the program participants' stories over the next several months.

The Mandel Center for Nonprofit Organizations, a nationally recognized program, serves as a resource to the development of nonprofit leadership and community development. The programs offered through the center provide a greater depth of understanding of a topic not only through substantive content grounded in the latest research, but also through application techniques and support that enables participants to apply their knowledge to make meaningful positive changes in their workplace.

One of these signature initiatives is the Treu-Mart Youth Development Fellowship Program. Since its inception in 2004, more than 10,000 youths have been positively impacted by the work of the fellows.

Treu-Mart Fellows are professionals who:

  • See the strengths and gifts in young people
  • Commit themselves to providing youths the support they need to thrive
  • Work with middle-school-aged young people during out-of-school-time in the Greater Cleveland area
  • Seek to continually learn and develop their own skills and talents

Ben Hughes is one of almost 150 youth-service professionals who have benefited from the Treu-Mart Fellowship. Read his story.

Campus News

H1N1 updates for the campus community are available online. The university and its Emerging Infections Committee continue to monitor conditions and communicate with the campus community regularly to keep students, faculty and staff informed and to give them easy access to additional resources.

rs2009.jpg

Submissions for presentations are being accepted through January 15 for Research ShowCASE 2010, which will take place Thursday, April 15, at the Veale Convocation Center. The campus community is invited to join fellow faculty, staff and students in presenting their latest research and scholarship. This year's graduate and post-doctoral poster competition will be more selective than in prior years, and include more cash prizes. Due to the earlier deadline of January 15, submission abstracts should be sent in before the holiday break. Refer to the Research ShowCASE Web site for details.

football.jpg

For the third consecutive year, the Case Western Reserve University football team will play in the NCAA Division III postseason. The Spartans will take on Trine University at noon, Saturday, Nov. 21, at Case Field. Ticket prices for Saturday's game are $8 for adults and $4 for children. Case Western Reserve students will receive free admission with their university ID, courtesy of the Division of Student Affairs.

The Psychology Clinic is available to provide flexible, low cost counseling for adults and children in the Cleveland community. Call 368-0719 to learn about the clinic's psychological services or to speak with one of the coordinators.

For Faculty and Staff

Due to the holidays and to ensure that month end payroll for December has sufficient time to process, there are changes to the December month-end cut off dates. The new date for time approval will be Dec. 17, which means the new date for time entry is Dec. 16. The new date for payment requests entered for 12/31 and for HR/ Records pay changes/updates also will be Dec 17.

For Students

The latest issue of The Observer is available online.

Students can now add or change their meal plan selection online on the CaseOneCard site beginning Dec. 1. Log in to "My Account" and select the Meal plan change tab. The online option will remain active for the spring semester meal plan selection until Friday, Jan. 22, at 5 p.m. Please note that not all meal plan selections are available to all students. Meal plan change requests must be received by close of business on the last day of the second week of classes to be considered. Students who change their meal plan more than twice within the first two weeks of classes will incur a $25 charge for each additional change.

Students are invited to volunteer with the Homeless Stand Down (HSD), a mid-winter retreat for those facing the challenges of poverty and homelessness. Guests relax to entertainment, enjoy hot meals, escape from the elements, receive health screenings and have easy access to social service providers. Mistletoe Residential College, CWRU Habitat for Humanity and the Interreligious Council invite people to volunteer at the event, which will be held in February 2010. Sign up in Leutner from 5 to 7 p.m. through Nov. 24. Send an e-mail to h-s-d2010@case.edu for additional information.

The Center for Civic Engagement and Learning is recruiting eight first-year students to participate as Civic Engagement Fellows during the spring 2010 semester. While serving four to six hours at a local nonprofit, fellows also will participate in seminars to increase their leadership skills and understanding of Cleveland. Fellows receive a stipend of $9.20 per hour. Applications can be completed online and are due by Monday, Nov. 23.

Sigma Psi Sorority will host its 31st Annual Mr. CWRU pageant tonight 7:30 p.m. in Schmitt Lecture Hall. Mr. CWRU is an annual philanthropy event with proceeds benefiting a local charity. Proceeds will benefit the East Cleveland Neighborhood Center. Tickets are on sale in Nord Hall, Thwing Center, and Fribley and Leutner Commons.

Events

On November 24, 1859, Charles Darwin's book, On the Origin of Species, appeared in print for the first time. A birthday party celebration will take place from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., Tuesday, Nov. 24, in Goodyear Auditorium (Clapp 108 ). Bruce Latimer, professor of anthropology, anatomy and cognitive science, will deliver a talk, and birthday cake will be served. Free, open to the public. Sponsored by the Evolutionary Biology Program, the EvoClub, and the Institute for the Science of Origins at Case Western Reserve.

WorldAidsDay.jpg

The Flora Stone Mather Center for Women and the Master of Public Health Program will co-sponsor "The Impact of HIV/AIDS on Women in Cuyahoga County: A Focus on Prevention" from noon to 1 p.m., Tuesday, Dec. 1, in the Guilford House Lounge. The discussion will take place on World AIDS Day. The interactive panel discussion will feature Lita Townsend, responsible sexual behavior supervisor for the Cleveland Metropolitan School District; Tracy Jones, chief operating officer, AIDS Taskforce of Greater Cleveland; and Jane Baum, clinical coordinator of the Case Western Reserve University/University Hospitals Case Medical Center Clinical Trials Unit. Lunch will be served at the event. Contact katie.hanna@case.edu for more information.

Alpha Phi will host its annual philanthropy event, Bid For Your Heart, at 7 p.m., Saturday, Nov. 21, in the Thwing Ballroom. Bid for Your Heart is a date auction where auctionees and their highest bidders receive a gift certificate from a local vendor. All proceeds will be donated to the Alpha Phi Foundation, which aids in the research and prevention of cardiac disease in women. Tickets are $5 at the door. Contact Tera Schmidt.

The views and opinions of those invited to speak on campus do not necessarily reflect the views of the university administration or any other segment of the university community.

Et al.

bradricca.jpg

Brad Ricca, a lecturer in the Department of English, is the winner of the 2009 St. Lawrence Book Award for his poetry manuscript, American Mastodon. Ricca will receive $1,000 and publication. American Mastodon will be available from Black Lawrence Press in late 2011.

Julie Wolfram, a doctoral candidate in the Department of Pathology, was awarded first place in the graduate biological category of the Microscopy Society of Northeastern Ohio's Fall Meeting and Student Poster Competition. Wolfram is co-mentored by Mark A. Smith, professor of pathology, and Hyoung-gon Lee, instructor of pathology.

November 20, 2009

A daily newsletter published by the Office of Marketing & Communications, Case Western Reserve University. Submit items for inclusion to: case-daily@case.edu.


libertyBanner170x260.jpg

Case in the News

For undefeated Case Western Reserve, QB Dan Whalen wraps up an unmatched career

The Plain Dealer, Nov. 20, 2009
This is a Division III football team that has been undefeated in the regular season for the last three years with one of the best quarterbacks in all of small college football. It's Case Western Reserve University. Almost sounds like Mount Union, but that's what former Willoughby South quarterback Dan Whalen has meant to the Cleveland academic powerhouse. Now, it's a force on the field with 31 consecutive regular-season victories.

NSF supports Case Western Reserve University's IDEAL

Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News, Nov. 18, 2009
A program at Case Western Reserve University to encourage career advancement of women and underrepresented minority men in sciences and engineering is expanding to five public institutions of higher education.

Research collaboration focuses on unfinished business at the end of life

MedPage Today, Nov. 17, 2009
Hospice workers have seen patients hang onto life to tell someone they love or forgive them. Researchers from the Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing and the College of Arts and Sciences at Case Western Reserve University will begin several end-of-life studies.

Evidence search resumes at Cleveland bodies house

Coshocton Tribune, Nov. 19, 2009
Investigators used shovels, a sledgehammer and a concrete-busting drill Wednesday in a renewed search of the home of a registered sex offender where 10 bodies and a skull have been found, but police said no additional bodies were found. Paul Giannelli, a law school professor at Case Western Reserve University, said police often will seek a new warrant to reflect the scope of an expanded search.

Discriminating against smokers again

The Observer, Nov. 20, 2009
According to an opinion piece in The Observer, Case Western Reserve University, along with many other colleges, has created designated smoking areas (DSAs) around campus. The goal is to isolate non-smokers from second hand smoke, for various reasons. Such action is becoming more common around college campuses, especially at public colleges.

Higher Ed News

Many parents inaccurately claim college tax credit

USA TODAY, Nov. 19, 2009
More than 314,000 taxpayers made inaccurate claims for a popular tax credit that helps pay college expenses, getting $532 million they weren't entitled to receive, a government report said Thursday. The Hope Credit provides up to $1,650 a year to help pay expenses for the first two years of college. The taxpayers claimed the credit for the same student three consecutive years, instead of the two years available, said a report by the Treasury inspector general for tax administration.