Prestigious NEH Fellowships Aid Humanities Faculty's Book Projects

landau.jpg

2susanneveesgulani.jpg

The National Endowment for the Humanities offered two College of Arts and Sciences faculty members—Ellen G. Landau from art history and Susanne Vees-Gulani from modern languages and literatureprestigious and competitive NEH Fellowships to support their research.

This is the first time that two faculty members have received fellowships in one year in recent history. Over the past years, CWRU has been the recipient of 48 NEH awards.

NEH funded 319 humanities projects.

NEH has given support for the projects, "Mexico and American Modernism," by Landau, Andrew W. Mellon Professor of the Humanities, and "The Myths of Dresden: Origins and Manifestations of the German Victim Discourse" by Vees-Gulani, assistant professor of comparative literature and German. Read more.

Sustainability Fellow Recognized for Efforts

E4Sprogram.jpg

Case Western Reserve University's Sustainability Fellow was recently recognized for her efforts by a Northeast Ohio organization focused on best practices in the sustainability field.

Entrepreneurs for Sustainability (E4S) recently named Linda Robson one of its Champions of Sustainability. The award recognizes individuals who implement sustainability principles at their business or organization. Recipients are champions of sustainability in a variety of areas. Examples are: encouraging their business or organization to install solar panels, purchasing local foods, designing green roofs and recycling waste water.

Nominations were made by community members. Robson was nominated by Gene Matthews, director of facilities services at Case Western Reserve. Read more.

Campus News

As the weather gets colder, the university's fire safety and prevention coordinator is offering helpful information regarding the use of space heaters on campus.

Campus community members experiencing difficulties with the heat in their buildings should contact Plant Services at facility@case.edu. For urgent building issues call 368-2580.

People have different levels of comfort regarding heat. Space heaters are permitted to be used as a temporary solution during these cold winter months provided that they are used safely. As a reminder, students are prohibited from possessing space heaters in university housing per the Student Code of Conduct.

Employees who use space heaters should follow these safety requirements and tips:

  • Only use listed and labeled space heaters that have been tested by a recognized testing laboratory (i.e. UL).
  • Do not plug space heaters in to extension cords. Space heaters need to be plugged directly into a wall outlet.
  • Keep all combustibles (anything that can burn) at least three feet away from the heater.
  • Only use in areas where the manufacturer designed them to be used.
  • Do not use near water or in areas where flammable/combustible liquids or gases are in use.
  • Place the heater on a level surface.
  • Do not leave a space heater unattended.
  • Be sure to turn it off and unplug it when leaving for the day.
  • Do not place power cords under carpeting.
  • Before using the heater, inspect the unit for any damage and the cord for any signs of deterioration (cracking, fraying, broken or loose connections). If any damage exists do not use the unit.
  • If any problems occur while using the space heater, stop using it immediately.
  • Always follow the manufacturer's recommendations on use.
  • Use space heaters that have tip-over protection, so in the event the space heater falls over it automatically shuts off.
  • Use heaters that have thermal cut-off protection, so in the event the space heater becomes too hot it shuts off the heater.

Any questions or concerns regarding the use of space heaters should be directed to Jim Dahle, fire safety and prevention coordinator, at 368-3120 or at james.dahle@case.edu.

For Faculty and Staff

adelbertwinter.jpg

President Barbara R. Snyder and Provost Bud Baeslack invite you to attend the annual Adelbert Hall Holiday Party, which will take place from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m., Friday, Dec. 18. All university faculty and staff (all employees) are welcome to stop by to partake of beverages, heavy hors d'oeuvres and desserts. Musicians from the Cleveland Institute of Music will perform. Contact Erica Munson with questions.

For Students

skis.jpg

Students who are staying in Cleveland during winter break are invited to participate in the Case Ventures Winter Series, which includes skiing or visiting trendy Cleveland spots and restaurants at a discounted cost. Additional information and program fee details are available online.


Events

Refer to the University Circle Inc. calendar for a list of events and activities taking place in the community.

The views and opinions of those invited to speak on campus do not necessarily reflect the views of the university administration or any other segment of the university community.

Et al.

sanfordmarkowitz.jpg

As researchers and clinicians fervently look for causes and cures for colorectal cancer—simultaneously generating thousands of studies producing more and more promising results—Sanford Markowitz, professor and researcher of cancer and genetics at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and oncologist at the Case Comprehensive Cancer Center at University Hospitals Case Medical Center, published his forward-looking view of the "Molecular Basis of Colorectal Cancer" in the Dec. 17, 2009 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. The co-author is Monica Bertagnolli from the Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School.

"Today's challenges are to understand the molecular basis of individual susceptibility to colorectal cancer and to determine factors that initiate the development of the tumor, drive its progression, and determine its responsiveness or resistance to antitumor agents," Markowitz wrote. Read more.

December 17, 2009

A daily newsletter published by the Office of Marketing & Communications, Case Western Reserve University. Submit items for inclusion to: case-daily@case.edu.


coach2.jpg

Case in the News

Synthetic platelets quickly stem bleeding-study

Reuters, Dec. 16, 2009
Synthetic blood platelets injected into patients at the scene of a traumatic injury can speed up blood clotting and stem internal bleeding, U.S researchers reported on Wednesday. The faster the bleeding is stopped the better in most trauma situations, said research leader Erin Lavik of Case Western Reserve University.

Theorists propose a new way to shine–and a new kind of star

Astronomy Magazine, Dec. 15, 2009
For some stellar objects, the final phase before or instead of collapsing into a black hole may be what a group of physicists is calling an electroweak star. Glenn Starkman, professor of physics at Case Western Reserve University, together with De-Chang Dai and Dejan Stojkovic at the State University of New York in Buffalo, and Arthur Lue at MIT's Lincoln Lab, offer a description of the structure of an electroweak star in a paper submitted to Physical Review Letters.

Molecular basis of colorectal cancer review points to key advances

ScienceDaily, Dec. 17, 2009
As researchers and clinicians fervently look for causes and cures for colorectal cancer—simultaneously generating thousands of studies producing more and more promising results—Sanford Markowitz, professor and researcher of cancer and genetics at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and oncologist at the Case Comprehensive Cancer Center at University Hospitals Case Medical Center, published his forward-looking view of the "Molecular Basis of Colorectal Cancer. The study's co-author is Monica Bertagnolli from the Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School.

Case Western Reserve, UH Case Medical Center part of consortium using $16 million to study anemia in the elderly

MedCity News, Dec. 16, 2009
Case Western Reserve University and University Hospitals Case Medical Center will participate in a consortium of national experts investigating why unexplained anemia is common in older adults. The consortium, called the Partnership for Anemia: Clinical and Translational Trials in the Elderly, is the result of a $16 million grant awarded by the National Institute on Aging.

Higher Ed News

Reactions: Is it time for class-based affirmative action?

Chronicle of Higher Education, Dec. 16, 2009
A new study from Public Agenda has found that the main reason students drop out of college is that they have to work. That raises the question: Has the time come for an affirmative-action policy based on socioeconomic status? And that raises a further question: Are the selective institutions that could provide enough financial aid to needy students, so they could work less, doing enough to recruit them? In other words, should the discussion of retention include a discussion of class and admissions? The Chronicle asked a group of scholars and experts what they thought.