Case Western Reserve University Receives
$4 Million Commitment to Name Planned New Multi-Functional Field House

fieldhouse.jpg
An artistic rendering of the new Wyant Field House

Optical science pioneer and Case Western Reserve University Trustee James C. Wyant, PhD, has made a $4 million commitment to name a new field house on campus. The "Wyant Field House" will be a new addition to the North Campus Residential Village.

The Wyant Field House will be approximately 24,000 square feet and will serve as a facility for varsity athletes and the 2,500 students who reside at the Village. The facility will include weight training and cardiovascular areas, a Varsity Club lounge, and multipurpose space. Also included in this gift is the "Coach Bill Sudeck Track," named in memory of the university's legendary coach, who was Wyant's mentor.

"We are enormously grateful to Jim Wyant for this gift and the way it pays tribute to the role that athletics can play in the development of young people," President Barbara R. Snyder said. "This project will enhance the experience of legions of students who seek to improve their physical fitness and their athletic performance." Read more.

Students from Amsterdam Make Visit
and Tour CMHA

An innovative program helping police be part of quick first-response to social service needs was the topic of a recent international visit.

Case Western Reserve University's Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences and the Cuyahoga Metropolitan Housing Authority Police Department welcomed 13 students and two faculty members from the Vrije University in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, last Thursday.

The visiting group, which toured CMHA police headquarters in Cleveland and went to a public housing estate, was interested in learning how the CMHA police, through an initiative called Police Assisted Referral (PAR), now are able to help residents and make referrals to social service agencies for assistance for a range of incidents, such as domestic violence, child abuse, and children exposed to violence. Read more.

Campus News

Summer barbecues

Sponsored by Bon Appétit Management Company, the Office of Summer Programs and Campus Services, the Summer Barbecues are an annual tradition designed to bring the campus community together in an atmosphere featuring festive food and music. Exciting menus and musical performances are featured for five Wednesdays beginning June 9 from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. on the Quad. Events are open to the public, and friends, visitors and family are welcome to attend. Each barbecue costs $7.75 per person (including a beverage), or $35 for a book of five tickets. Go online for more information about the specific menus and music.

The campus book club will discuss Kahled Hosseini's A Thousand Splendid Suns from noon to 1 p.m., Tuesday, June 8, in Crawford Hall 720. Contact Susan Benedict for details.

For Faculty and Staff

The Institute for Advanced Materials (IAM@Case) has received funding through the provost's Interdisciplinary Alliance Investment Grants (IAIG) to help groups of faculty put together large center proposals. This opportunity is open to faculty from all schools to submit one-page ideas. The only restriction is the proposed center must have a strong materials-based component. A request for proposals document has been prepared, along with a one-page template. Applications should be submitted to Tamara Fulton by the end of August for the initial round of funding. Contact Stuart J. Rowan, director of the Institute for Advanced Materials, for more information.

For Students

This section will be updated occasionally during the summer. Refer to the "Campus News" section for general information.

Events

The School of Dental Medicine's Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery is hosting a session on Ballistic Injuries: View from the Front. The talk is from 3 to 4 p.m., Tuesday, June 8, in the oral surgery conference room. The guest speaker is Barry Steinberg, director of the Center for Pediatric Facial Disorders and Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Florida. In 1989, 20 surgeons came together in Strasbourg to study and promote the use of rigid fixation techniques. The organization they formed became known as the Strasbourg Osteosynthesis Research Group, or SORG. The organization encourages research in the field of bone healing and osteosynthesis, educates and trains surgeons in the use of osteosynthesis techniques, and acts as a forum for debate and dialogue for surgeons and scientists. RSVP to Jill Johnson at jjohnson@klsmartin.com.

The views and opinions of those invited to speak on campus do not necessarily reflect the views of the university administration or any other segment of the university community.

Et al.

Campus community members and groups are invited to share their academic and departmental accolades. Send announcements to The Daily.

June 7, 2010

A daily newsletter published by the Office of Marketing & Communications, Case Western Reserve University. Submit items for inclusion to: case-daily@case.edu.

In the News

Former coach inspires Case Western Reserve University graduate to donate $4 million to school

The Plain Dealer, June 5, 2010
It happened nearly 50 years ago, but Jim Wyant will never forget his first meeting with Bill Sudeck. Wyant was a skinny freshman, sitting in a booth at the Howard Johnson's restaurant. He was having a milkshake and talking to a few friends. Sudeck recruited Wyant for the cross country team. "I was never that great of a runner," Wyant said. "But he was there for me all four years. He knew nothing about me when we first met, but he seemed to believe in me." Wyant is making a $4 million donation to Case Western Reserve University to build a field house that can be used by both athletes and students. There will be weights, equipment, a health/wellness center.

OSU aims to boost research revenue

The Columbus Dispatch, June 6, 2010
Ideas and discoveries are great, but they're better if they can be put to work in the marketplace – and generate money for those who came up with them. Ohio State University hasn't done as well as its peers in this area, but it hopes to turn that around with the creation of a Technology Commercialization Center. According to the Association of University Technology Managers, Case Western Reserve University was tops, with $13.2 million in licensing revenue in 2008.

Israel's Gaza blockade legal, many scholars say

San Francisco Chronicle, June 5, 2010
As another ship carrying activists and supplies heads toward besieged Gaza, Israel is asserting the right to stop and search the vessel as it did earlier this week. Normally, a nation that seizes a ship on the high seas, beyond its territorial waters, is guilty of piracy. But a nation that is enforcing a blockade in wartime has the right to board a ship that it reasonably suspects of carrying contraband for the cordoned-off area. Michael Scharf, an international law professor at Case Western Reserve University, comments.

Secretary of veterans affairs extols expansion of Cleveland VA medical center

Crain's Cleveland Business, June 4, 2010
The $370 million in construction, renovation and consolidation projects under way at the Louis Stokes Cleveland Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center will provide about 15,000 jobs throughout the duration of the project.The federal Department of Veterans Affairs chose to consolidate the University Circle and Brecksville locations because most of the veterans served by them lived closer to University Circle and because the Cleveland medical center collaborates with Case Western Reserve University on research.

Higher Ed News

A new ethics code for college admissions counselors

USA TODAY, June 7, 2010
The number of families hiring private counselors to advise them on the college application process continues to grow, with one recent study estimating that 26 percent of "high achieving" students now make use of such counselors. The field is unregulated and includes many one- or two-person operations, as well as large, slick businesses that boast about their clients' track records. The Higher Education Consultants Association, which represents 500 of the counselors in the field and is one of the two organizations of these counselors, has just adopted its first detailed ethics code.