Stimulus Money to Establish Campus
Behavior Science Resource Lab

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Shirley Moore

“Where can I find a behavioral specialist when I need one?” It’s a plea heard across campus by researchers who are increasingly required to understand how behavior relates to health issues.

Within the next year, a new one-stop, campuswide Behavioral Science Measurement Resource Laboratory will open to all Case Western Reserve University researchers to help them incorporate behavior as part of understanding health, social or psychological issues in their studies.

The Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, in collaboration with the School of Medicine, received a one-year, $647,000 grant from National Institutes of Health, funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, to establish the new lab.

“This project will result in a full-service, high-profile lab that will accelerate the speed of scientific advances. It will provide researchers with quicker and easier access to a comprehensive set of services, state-of-the-art equipment and approaches to measure behavior and its effect on health outcomes,” said Shirley Moore, the associate dean for research at the nursing school.

Moore will lead the project and work closely with Elaine Borawski, co-director of the Prevention Research Center for Healthy Neighborhoods and associate professor of epidemiology and biostatistics and Sue Flocke, associate professor of medicine, who oversees behavior labs at the School of Medicine.

Almost half of the grant, $300,000, will be used to construct the physical lab on campus.

“Currently we are scouting a site on campus where it will be convenient for researchers and study participants to access and park,” said Moore, the Edward J. and Louise Mellen Professor of Nursing. Read more.

Campus News

One of the university’s primary utility providers, the Medical Center Company, is launching a significant initiative to install new water lines in the northeast portion of the Case Quad. This project begins Monday and will take place in phases throughout the winter and early spring. Officials are still finalizing details regarding the precise timing of each phase and other logistical concerns, but representatives of the university are deeply involved in the planning effort and will inform the community as more specifics become available.

The first stage of the effort involves the VIC parking lot, located between Amasa Stone Chapel and Crawford Hall. Crews will be digging up concrete and installing pipes in the portion of the lot closest to the Case Quad (the southern end). Visitors will be unable to use some of the spaces during the construction period, expected to last through early January 2011. Because of the temporary reduction of spaces, Case Western Reserve University vehicles will be prohibited from using the lot during this period. They instead will be directed to use lots 1A or 1B.

Because of the construction, visitors using the VIC lot will not be able to use the southeastern corner walking path. Instead, Case Western Reserve Uuniversity facilities staff have installed temporary steps adjacent to the chapel for individuals to enter and exit the lot on foot.

In addition, later this month workers will begin to erect a “staging area” where they will prepare the large pipes for installation. This area will be just north of Adelbert Hall and east of the Binary Walkway; it also will be enclosed by fencing.

This project will enhance the efficiency of air conditioning and other services requiring chilled water. It is expected to result in long-term operational and capital savings for Case Western Reserve, and contribute to our efforts to become a more sustainable campus.

For Faculty and Staff

The final 2011 Benelect Open Enrollment confirmation statements will be available online through the PeopleSoft HCM system beginning Monday.  To access your 2011 Benelect Open Enrollment confirmation statement, log onto the open enrollment system in HCM.  A link to “Print Open Enrollment Confirmation Form” will be on the bottom right of the screen.  Please contact Benefits Administration at 368.6781 or benefits@case.edu by Dec. 15 if any errors on the form are discovered that need to be corrected. 

For Students

Many study abroad opportunities are available to students over winter, spring and summer breaks.  All are three-credit courses open to all undergraduate and graduate students.  Many students qualify for financial aid. The last information meeting will take place 12:30-1:30 p.m. Dec. 10 in meeting room C at Thwing

Programs offered through the Department of Bioethics include the following: winter break in San Jose, Costa Rica (includes an optional week of service learning through the Center for Civic Engagement and Learning before the course) and spring break courses in Paris, Amsterdam, Salamanca and Buenos Aires.  Go online for more information or contact Michelle L. Champoir, director of International Education Programs for the Department of Bioethics, at 368.5377 or by email.

Programs offered through the Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences for Spring Semester include the following: spring break in Guatemala, Turkey, Sub-Saharan Africa, Netherlands and Ecuador (May). With the exception of Netherlands, all are approved as global and cultural diversity electives.  Go online for more information or contact Deborah Jacobson, director of International Education Programs for the Mandel School, at 368.6014 or by email for details.

Events

The Department of Urology is hosting a research retreat on the Urological Complications of Obesity and Diabetes from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. next Wednesday in Wolstein 1403. Please join our multidisciplinary team of investigators and surgeon-scientists with a common interest in complications of obesity and diabetes. Discussions will include presentations of ongoing translational and clinical studies and future funding opportunities.  If you are interested in presenting your work or attending the retreat, please contact: Kerry O. Grimberg, PhD, or call 216.844.5434.

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Quire Cleveland  — the region's new professional chamber choir — announces its third season in 2010-2011. With concerts in December and April, the ensemble will perform choral masterworks from the 15th through the 19th centuries.  Performances for Carols for Quire from the Old & New Worlds will take place at 7:30 p.m. today and Saturday at Trinity Cathedral, 2230 Euclid Ave. Tickets are available through Quire Cleveland’s website and at the door. For more information, visit the website or call 216.223.8854.  Sing Praises: German Music for Quire will take place at 7:30 p.m. on April 13 at the Cathedral of St. John the Evangelist, 1007 Superior Ave. This concert is free and open to the public; no tickets are required. For more information, contact Greg Heislman, director of music, Cathedral of St. John, at 216.771.6666. Ross W. Duffin, who heads the nationally renowned Historical Performance Practice Program at Case Western Reserve University, is Quire Cleveland's director.

 

The views and opinions of those invited to speak on campus do not necessarily reflect the views of the university administration or any other segment of the university community.

Et al.

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Michael P. Scharf

Case Western Reserve University School of Law professor Michael P. Scharf has been invited to give the keynote speech at  the Rwanda National Conference, which will focus on the Genocide Convention. Next Thursday marks 62 years since the United Nations General Assembly adopted the text of the Convention for the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide. The international conference is Thursday and Friday at Laicos Hotel in Kigali, Rwanda. The topic of the conference is “The Genocide Convention Under Siege? The Cases of the UN Mapping Report on the DRC and Darfur.” Scharf is John Deaver Drinko-Baker and Hostetler Professor of Law and director of the Frederick K. Cox International Law Center.

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Bob Binstock, professor of aging, health and society, has published his seventh edition of the Handbook of Aging and the Social Sciences (Elsevier: 2011), co-edited with Linda George of Duke University. Among the distinguished contributors is Dale Dannefer, chair of the Sociology Department at CWRU.

Dec. 3, 2010

A daily newsletter published by the Office of Marketing & Communications, Case Western Reserve University. Submit items for inclusion to: case-daily@case.edu.

In the News

New Technologies Allow for Better Tracking of HIV

Doctorslounge.com, Dec. 2, 2010
Denis M. Tebit, PhD, and Eric J. Arts, PhD, of Case Western Reserve University, date the original transmission of HIV-1 from chimpanzees to humans as occurring in 1908 in equatorial Africa. New technology has aided the tracking of HIV-1 and its circulating recombinant forms (CRFs), they report in The Lancet Infectious Diseases

University Circle Inc. aims to support walking tour

Cleveland.com, Dec. 2, 2010
CircleWalk, with elaborate signs and potential video and audio features, will be a longer-term project. A very preliminary sketch of the tour shows a meandering path that wraps around the Case Western Reserve University campus, museums and neighborhoods. The actual layout for the tour has not been determined. University Circle Inc. expects to choose a planning and design team in early 2011.

Task Force seeks better judicial candidates through a screening panel

Cleveland.com, Dec. 2, 2010
About 70 people attended a public forum Wednesday night at Case Western Reserve University to discuss ways to improve the quality of judicial candidates in Cuyahoga County. The dominant them was, a better way is needed to get qualified candidates on the ballot. A task force recommends creating a screening panel to find qualified candidates.

Higher Ed News

How Doctoral Graduates Fare

Inside Higher Ed, Dec. 3, 2010
At the Council of Graduate Schools’ annual meeting Thursday in Washington, many graduate deans find  tracking career outcomes is, as yet, an unattained goal of many graduate deans. Some of the issues standing in their way, they said, are decentralized information gathering; an inability to pay additional administrative staff to track the data consistently; and tension between faculty and deans on what constitutes a successful placement.