School of Law Team Wins Moot Court Competition

CWRU Law school Jessup team
The team members, (from left) Tyler Talbert, Elizabeth Sparks,
Cameron McLeod and Jory Hoffman, will travel to Washington,
D.C., in the spring to compete in the International Rounds.

Case Western Reserve University School of Law’s Jessup Team won the Midwest regional Philip C. Jessup International Law Moot Court Competition in Chicago. This is the fourth year out of the past five that Case Western Reserve’s team has won the competition.

The law school’s Jessup team, consisting of Cameron McLeod, Elizabeth Sparks, Jory Hoffman and Tyler Talbert, won all four preliminary rounds against DePaul University, Michigan State University, University of Tennessee and University of Iowa. Then, McLeod and Hoffman beat Wayne State University in the quarterfinals and Thomas M. Cooley Law School in the semifinals, and Talbert and Sparks beat University of Michigan in the final round. Read more.

Campus News

The Prevention Research Center for Healthy Neighborhoods launched a new website for FreshLink (formerly Increasing Healthy Food Access in Urban Neighborhoods), which includes general information about the project, history and mission, research information and more. FreshLink is a five-year research project that aims to improve access to healthy foods in urban neighborhoods and evaluate the impact of those changes on disease prevention and overall health.

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The University Bookstore is offering a 25 percent discount on all Adidas campus apparel Feb. 14-27.

For Faculty and Staff

CWRU Employee Wellness invites faculty/staff members to “Zumba to a Healthy Heart” with two free activity classes at 121 Fitness Center during American Heart Month. Full access to showers, towels, lockers and sauna facilities are included. Register online for the Feb. 23 session, noon-1 p.m., or the Feb. 24 session, 7:30-8:30 a.m.

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UCITE presents “Scholarship in the Digital Age,” a general overview of what is happening in digital scholarship, including several examples of ongoing projects and relevant research tools. It will take place Thursday, Feb. 17 from noon to 1 p.m. in the Herrick Room on the ground floor of the Allen Building. Pizza and sodas will be provided. RSVP to ucite@case.edu.

For Students

The Intersections: Undergraduate Symposium and Poster Session will be held April 15. The abstract proposal deadline is March 18. For more information, click here.

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Senior portraits will be taken Feb. 24-25 in the 1914 Lounge in Thwing Center. Sign up here for a free five-minute session. This is your last chance to have your senior photo taken this semester! Email Megan Schulstad or visit retrospect.case.edu for more information.

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It is not too late to take advantage of the Spartan Shape Up undergraduate membership at 121 Fitness Center. Join in February for the prorated amount of $135 and enjoy all the free amenities included with membership: more than 55 group exercise classes, free parking, four free training sessions, lockers, towels and more! Memberships last until May 15 and Case Cash is accepted. Register online or at 121 Fitness Center.

Events

Spring SatCo.—Saturday classes that are open to the entire university community—will be held Feb. 26. Topics vary from improv and tap dance to tours of the West Side Market and anime screenings. Spaces are filling up fast so register online today. If you have any questions, email Melissa Turk.

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Stephanie Liscio
Stuart Youngner

Stuart J. Youngner, Susan E. Watson Professor and Chairman of the Department of Bioethics, will present Regulated Euthanasia in the Netherlands: Is it Working?” The event will be held Feb. 23 from noon to 1 p.m. in the School of Medicine Room E501. RSVP by noon on Feb. 21 to pdf6@case.edu or by calling 216.368.6196.

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Eldred Theater at Case Western Reserve University continues its drama series with Laundry and Bourbon and Lone Star, by James McLure. Performances are Feb. 11, 12, 17, 18, 19 at 8 p.m., with Sunday matinees on Feb. 13 and 20 at 2:30 p.m. Liquor and the Texas heat are constants in this bitterly comic set of one-acts that explores the lives of three women and three men in a small Texas town, set against the backdrop of the Vietnam War. Funny, poignant, and with a touch of madness, each play focuses on one gender, and how each deals with the changes that life brings. General admission is $10, with discounted prices of $7 for adults over 60 and Case Western Reserve University personnel, and $5 for students. For ticket reservations or information, call the box office for the department of theater at 216.368.6262.

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Engineers Week, sponsored by the Case Engineers Council, will be held Feb. 17-25. All students, faculty, staff, alumni and professionals are invited to attend the events, including the Engineering Council at the Great Lakes Science Center, industry-sponsored brunches, SWE luncheon, E-Week Banquet, lightbulb drop competition and more. E-week T-shirts and tickets for the E-Week Banquet at the Renaissance Hotel will be on sale Thursday, Feb. 24, in Nord 304. For more information and a complete list of events, click here. Questions? Contact Maria Campbell by email or call 216.368.5024.

The views and opinions of those invited to speak on campus do not necessarily reflect the views of the university administration or any other segment of the university community.

Et al.

Case Western Reserve University’s Interfraternity Council received the Jellison Award in Interfraternity Council Division III, while the Panhellenic Council received the Sutherland Award in Panhellenic Council Division II from the Association of Fraternal Leadership and Values (AFLV). Both awards recognize the councils with the highest percentage of achievement in eight programming categories. The Interfraternity Council beat out six other councils for the award, while the Panhellenic Council competed against 10 other councils to win.

Feb. 16, 2011

A daily newsletter published by the Office of Marketing & Communications, Case Western Reserve University. Submit items for inclusion to: case-daily@case.edu.

In the News

Energy Drinks Could Give Kids Seizures
WPRI Eyewitness News, Feb. 14, 2011
Although up to half of children and teenagers drink energy drinks, some contain triple the amount of caffeine recommended for teenagers, which could lead to seizures, according to a study. Michael Anderson, professor in the School of Medicine, said caffeine’s effects range from jittery feelings and racing hearts to hearts pumping improperly, which could cause people to lose consciousness.

Encouraging Innovation Isn’t Costly
NationalJournal, Feb. 14, 2011
President Obama’s energy budget proposal operates under the premise that clean energy innovation must be expensive and require government investment. But this premise is flawed, according to an article written by Jonathan Adler, professor of law and director of the Center for Business Law & Regulation.

Legislators: Pollock Bill Not Likely to Pass
The Daily Iowan, Feb. 15, 2011
A proposed bill to force the University of Iowa’s Museum of Art to sell a $140-million-dollar Jackson Pollock painting to fund scholarships likely will not pass into law, and might not even make it out of the House. Henry Adams, professor of art history, said the painting is considered the piece that made Pollock the “best painter in the world.”

NC Law Firm Investigates Potti Trials
The Chronicle, Feb. 11, 2011
A personal injury law firm in North Carolina is looking into clinical trials that should not have been conducted. Sharona Hoffman, co-director of the Law-Medicine Center at Case Western Reserve University School of Law, said if the patients received standard-of-care treatment, legal action might be difficult, but they could still sue based on the idea that the trials were conducted under false pretenses.

Higher Ed News

Traditional Language Programs Have Declined Steadily Over Decades

The Chronicle of Higher Education, Feb. 14, 2011
The number of students majoring in languages such as German, Italian and French has declined drastically since 1971. The site also includes a chart of the fastest-declining academic fields at four-year colleges from 1971 to 2006.