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links for 2011-09-27

  • "We want people to come away with a different sense of what constitutes a health story,” says Michelle Levander, a veteran journalist and founding director of the fellowships. “We focus on health as it plays out in the community, as opposed to the medical research arena. We’re trying to broaden journalists’ perspective and encourage fellows to think critically about where ill health starts.”

Posted by: Staff on September 28, 2011
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2011-09-16

  • "Teen suicide is a very real issue today in the United States. Until now, we've known very little about how much or how little suicidal teens use healthcare services. We found it particularly striking to observe such low rates of healthcare service use among most teens in our study," said lead author Carolyn A. McCarty, PhD of Seattle Children's Research Institute, and research associate professor of pediatrics at the University of Washington School of Medicine. The study, "Adolescents With Suicidal Ideation: Health Care Use and Functioning," was recently published in Academic Pediatrics.
  • The new nonprofit group, called Enroll America, plans a state-by-state effort to publicize the expanded availability of health coverage and to help state leaders put in place procedures to simplify enrollment
  • Overall, there has been an increase in funded school nurse positions in the U.S. in the last decade. But the numbers vary significantly by state, and some districts have no school nurses at all.

Posted by: Staff on September 16, 2011
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2011-09-14

  • The portion of Americans living in poverty last year rose to the highest level since 1993, the Census Bureau reported Tuesday, fresh evidence that the sluggish economic recovery has done nothing for the country’s poorest citizens.
    (tags: poverty)

Posted by: Staff on September 14, 2011
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2011-09-13

Posted by: Staff on September 13, 2011
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2011-09-06

  • Three hundred and fifty thousand: That's a conservative estimate for the number of offenders with mental illness confined in America's prisons and jails. In fact, the three largest inpatient psychiatric facilities in the country are jails: Los Angeles County Jail, Rikers Island Jail in New York City and Cook County Jail in Illinois. What can be done?
    (tags: mental illness)
  • According to a new analysis, the United States now ranks 41st in the world in terms of neonatal mortality, the death rate of infants less than one month old. The rate is higher in the United States than in, among others, Cuba, Slovakia, Croatia and all of Western Europe and Scandinavia.

Posted by: Staff on September 06, 2011
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2011-09-01

Posted by: Staff on September 01, 2011
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2011-08-12

Posted by: Staff on August 12, 2011
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2011-08-09

Posted by: Staff on August 09, 2011
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2011-07-02

  • "Our study not only demonstrates that there is a racial disparity in acute stroke treatment rates in this predominantly African-American urban population, but identifies two important underlying reasons: African-Americans do not get to the hospital early enough for treatment and they have a greater number of medical reasons for not receiving treatment," says Chelsea Kidwell, MD, director of the Georgetown University Stroke Center.

Posted by: Staff on July 02, 2011
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2011-06-28

  • Alarmed by a shortage of primary care doctors, Obama administration officials are recruiting a team of “mystery shoppers” to pose as patients, call doctors’ offices and request appointments to see how difficult it is for people to get care when they need it.

Posted by: Staff on June 28, 2011
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2011-06-10

  • The Ohio Senate has added an amendment to the proposed state budget at the request of the Ohio Restaurant Association that would ban local municipalities from regulating the ingredients fast food-type eateries can use to prepare foods. "With what the Cleveland City Council did, it just made us think that this might be the beginning of a trend in Ohio and we knew that would be bad for the restaurant industry," Mason said.

Posted by: Staff on June 10, 2011
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2011-06-07

Posted by: Staff on June 07, 2011
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2011-06-06

Posted by: Staff on June 06, 2011
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2011-06-04

Posted by: Staff on June 04, 2011
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2011-05-23

  • he health center, which is expected to open later this year, will house two primary-care doctors. There will be computer stations for the public and a fully equipped kitchen where a dietitian can lead cooking classes. It also will have space set aside for educational programs that target those with chronic conditions, such as diabetes and hypertension.

Posted by: Staff on May 23, 2011
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2011-05-17

Posted by: Staff on May 17, 2011
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2011-05-10

  • "This report shows that even higher-income, uninsured families are struggling to meet the high costs of health care," Sherry Glied, assistant secretary for planning and evaluation at Health and Human Services, said in a statement. "No family should bear the burden of being one illness or accident away from bankruptcy."

Posted by: Staff on May 10, 2011
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2011-05-05

Posted by: Staff on May 05, 2011
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2011-04-26

Posted by: Staff on April 26, 2011
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2011-04-20

Posted by: Staff on April 20, 2011
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2011-03-30

  • Modlin, a urologist and one of fewer than 20 black transplant surgeons in the country, has been working to combat health disparities for the majority of his career.

    In 2003 he organized the Clinic's first Minority Men's Health Fair. The following year, he founded the Minority Men's Health Center, part of the Clinic's Glickman Urological and Kidney Institute. The center provides outpatient services on Wednesdays and, starting in April, Tuesdays.





  • Please check out this link for a list of Ohio's Minority Health Month activities for 2011.


Posted by: Staff on March 30, 2011
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2011-03-28

Posted by: Staff on March 28, 2011
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2011-02-08

Posted by: Staff on February 08, 2011
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2011-02-02

Posted by: Staff on February 02, 2011
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2010-12-09

Posted by: Staff on December 09, 2010
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2010-12-04

  • School meal programs have a major impact on the nation’s health, and supporters of the bill said it could reduce the prevalence of obesity among children. The lunch program feeds more than 31 million children a day.

Posted by: Staff on December 04, 2010
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2010-12-01

Posted by: Staff on December 01, 2010
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2010-11-30

  • A hazecam has been working on the 10th floor of MetroHealth Medical Center in Cleveland, taking photographs of the air quality hovering over downtown. The Northeast Ohio Areawide Coordinating Agency recently decided to support a one-year pilot program to continue operating a camera and archive four pictures being taken every hour. The Cleveland Plain Dealer has an article about the hazecam in today's Metro section. You can see the hazecam "live" at http://clevelandhazecam.net/
  • Treatment for children with autism spectrum disorders is costly and following up with the treatment is time consuming. Parents in Texas hit the headlines about their fight to get Applied Behavioral Analysis (ABA) Therapy coverage for their daughter. Their struggles point out the difficulty in treating children with autism. Noting their incomes, one has to wonder how people of lower income brackets are able to make it work for their children. Are they afforded the same opportunities?
  • It is a myth that only Caucasian, well-off females are at risk, David S. Rosen, MD, from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor and team wrote. The results of the anti-obesity drive over the last few years - focusing on eating habits and losing weight - may have unintentionally contributed towards an increase in eating disorders, the authors add.

Posted by: Staff on November 30, 2010
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2010-11-23

Posted by: Staff on November 23, 2010
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2010-11-05

Posted by: Staff on November 05, 2010
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2010-11-02

Posted by: Staff on November 02, 2010
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2010-10-26

Posted by: Staff on October 26, 2010
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2010-10-23

Posted by: Staff on October 23, 2010
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2010-10-22

Posted by: Staff on October 22, 2010
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2010-10-21

Posted by: Staff on October 21, 2010
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2010-10-07

  • An article appearing in the Archives of Internal Medicine looks into the racial disparities of end of life discussions in advanced cancer patients. The study found that while there are similar rates for end of life discussions, black patients tend to have lower terminal illness awareness, more preferences for life prolonging care and are less likely to have a DNR in place. For more information, read the summary at Kaiser Health News.
    (tags: End of life, race)

Posted by: Staff on October 07, 2010
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2010-09-30

  • Congress is about to increase the amount of money it gives to the National School Lunch Program. The Obama administration asked for more than $10 billion to improve the program over 10 years. The current bill cuts that money in half. If the bill passes, districts will get about a 6-cent increase per child. Currently, schools in high-expense cities such as San Francisco get $2.74 a meal per child. "When's the last time you could get a lunch for that price?" Woldow asked. "What we need is really about $5 a child to feed them healthy food."The No. 1 meal served to children in U.S. schools is chicken fingers and French fries. Processed food is much cheaper to serve than fresh produce.

Posted by: Staff on September 30, 2010
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2010-08-24

Posted by: Staff on August 24, 2010
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2010-08-17

  • At any given time in the United States, more than 100,000 people are waiting for donor organs, more than 10 times as many as become available. Some die waiting; others get sicker and sicker, sometimes too ill to survive when a suitable organ finally becomes available.

Posted by: Staff on August 17, 2010
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2010-08-13

Posted by: Staff on August 13, 2010
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2010-08-12

Posted by: Staff on August 12, 2010
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2010-08-10

Posted by: Staff on August 10, 2010
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2010-07-07

Posted by: Staff on July 07, 2010
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2010-07-03

  • Mothers of children with autism see their careers disproportionally affected as they confront greater demands on their time, inflexible workplaces and increased medical costs, according to a new study by researchers at Washington State University Vancouver. "We found that negative effects concentrate on the mother," said Dana Baker, lead author with Laurie Drapela of a paper published online this month in the peer-reviewed Social Science Journal.

Posted by: Staff on July 03, 2010
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2010-06-22

  • New study from the Ohio State University shows that US preschool-aged children exposed to the 3 household routines of regularly eating the evening meal as a family, obtaining adequate nighttime sleep, and having limited screen-viewing time had an ~40% lower prevalence of obesity than those exposed to none of these routines. These household routines may be promising targets for obesity-prevention efforts in early childhood. The article is published in Pediatrics and is written by Sarah Anderson and Robert Whitaker.

Posted by: Staff on June 22, 2010
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2010-06-21

Posted by: Staff on June 21, 2010
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2010-06-17

  • Possible explanations suggested by this study for the differences in surgical rates for blacks compared to whites include perceptions by black patients of poor doctor-patient communication. Also, black patients were less likely than whites to have primary care providers or other sources of support that could help them either reconsider the decision when they don't fully understand their prognosis or challenge a clinical decision against surgery that was not based on absolute contraindications complicating conditions that are considered to make surgery inadvisable.
  • The study is being called the first to estimate how often current and former patients have skipped getting care because of money worries. It was led by Kathryn Weaver, a researcher at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center in Winston-Salem, N.C. Cancer survivors under the age of 65 years were 55 percent more likely to delay or forgo all types of medical care than their same age peers without a history of cancer. “This is important because cancer survivors have many medical needs that persist for years after their diagnosis and treatment,” said Dr. Weaver. Hispanic and black cancer survivors were more likely to go without prescription medications and dental care than white survivors.
    (tags: cancer)

Posted by: Staff on June 17, 2010
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2010-06-08

Posted by: Staff on June 08, 2010
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2010-06-04

  • The bill includes a requirement that Ohio schools measure kids' body mass index, a measure of height and weight, in kindergarten, third, fifth, and ninth grades. However, school districts can seek a waiver to drop the requirement. The bill also called for 30 minutes a day of exercise from youngsters, but school districts successfully lobbied to turn that into a pilot project for districts that want to participate. The vigorous debate among House lawmakers on the legislation comes as children's health groups estimate that about one-third of Ohio children are considered overweight or obese.
  • Community intervention can help American Indian families change behavior related to early childhood weight gain and obesity, according to a new Kaiser Permanente and Northwest Portland Area Indian Health Board (NPAIHB) study.

Posted by: Staff on June 04, 2010
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2010-05-28

  • Thirty-five percent of the pharmacies could provide no translation service and the rest offered only limited translation services. The results showed that 44 percent of pharmacies located in counties where Hispanics made up more than a fourth of the population were unable to translate instructions.
  • Statistics show that language is a major factor in cases of misdiagnosis and instances of poor treatment at hospitals, and delays in service or access to preventive care. Medical error in general is a troubling issue, but patients with limited English proficiency are almost twice as likely to suffer adverse events in U.S. hospitals, resulting in temporary harm or death, according to a pilot study by The Joint Commission - an independent, not-for-profit organization that evaluates and accredits more than 15,000 health care organizations and programs in the United States
  • The success of the integrative approach of a medical-legal partnership is one reason advocates say there is bipartisan support, even in health care-weary Congress, for a federal demonstration project to measure the effects on patients, physicians and health centers, said Ellen Lawton, executive director of the National Center for Medical Legal Partnership. Medical Legal partnerships exist as part of a grass-roots program launched in Boston in 1993 and currently there are 85 partnerships in 37 states.
  • Omro is among a growing number of Wisconsin school districts that are serving students fresh, locally grown produce through the National Farm to School program — part of an initiative to bring healthy food from local farms to school children. The program sprouted from a desire in the late 1990s to support community-based food systems, strengthen family farms and promoting healthy eating habits in students.
  • "The National Action Plan released by HHS calls for all sectors to become engaged in the effort to ensure that consumers have the tools they need to navigate our health care system. Our members are responding to this challenge, and we stand ready to work with others to address this important foundation for the reform of our health care system."
  • Amnesty International highlights the number of people living in "extreme poverty" or on less than $1.25 per day, the disproportionate effect that limited progress on Millennium Development Goal targets has had on women and the hundreds of thousands of people displaced by 'ongoing armed conflicts and insecurity.

Posted by: Staff on May 28, 2010
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2010-05-27

Posted by: Staff on May 27, 2010
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2010-05-26

  • Economic access has become a primary research focus in public health nutrition, including the work by Adam Drewnowski, UW Professor of Epidemiology and his team. Supermarket chains have specific demographics--consumers differ by age, education, income, health, and even obesity rates. "The county-wide [Seattle] obesity rate in 2007 was 19.8 percent, but our research found that the obesity rate was only four percent among Whole Foods and PCC shoppers," said Drewnowski. "Consumers who shop at most area supermarket chains have obesity rates at 25 percent and higher. Clearly, not all supermarkets are the same and economic access is determined by price."

Posted by: Staff on May 26, 2010
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2010-05-24

  • "Effective communication between patients and their doctors is critical to ensure proper care and treatment is prescribed, and it's especially important in addressing disparities in the care of high risk patients," said Jill A. Foster, M.D., M.P.H., co-author of the study and medical director at CE Outcomes, LLC, in Birmingham, Ala. "Findings from these surveys suggest that neither patients nor doctors may realize they're missing key cultural differences, an oversight that can impede health outcomes."
  • At non-minority-serving hospitals, there were no disparities in readmissions (23.3 percent versus 23.1percent). Heart failure is the most common cause of hospitalizations and readmissions in the Medicare program. Improving efforts at poor-performing, minority-serving hospitals could increase quality of care for all heart failure patients and reduce racial healthcare disparities, researchers said.
  • The criteria for prioritizing specific funding should be simple: what are the evidence-based programs that are primed and ready to go, that are proven to work, that we know will move us toward a healthier society and that we can be sure will deliver a large, measurable return on investment? By these criteria, the top priority for prevention spending should be tobacco control.
  • "These findings are very timely as Congress considers the more comprehensive Fatherhood, Marriage and Families Innovation Fund, proposed in the President's 2011 budget," said Carmen R. Nazario, HHS' assistant secretary for children and families. "The results of this study show that it is possible to positively influence and strengthen families with support programs, but also suggest that the current approach isn't adequate.
    (tags: families)
  • Twenty years ago, the United States ranked 29th in the child mortality rate, according to data analyzed by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington. But as much of the world makes strides in reducing child mortality, the United States is increasingly lagging and now ranks 42nd globally, behind much of Europe as well as the United Arab Emirates, Cuba and Chile. The estimates, derived from modeling based on international birth records and other sources, are being published Monday in the British medical journal The Lancet.

Posted by: Staff on May 24, 2010
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2010-05-22

  • Some of the increased spending on drugs for young people went toward flu medications tied to the H1N1 pandemic. But that built on a base of increasing use of prescription drugs in children due to obesity, diabetes and other health issues that used to be largely the province of the middle-aged. Overall, Medco says, 26% of those under 19, and 29% of kids aged 10 to 19, are taking medications for a chronic condition. Among the meds they’re taking: diabetes drugs, antihypertensives, cholesterol medications and asthma treatments. “All of these adult drugs are popping up in children, which is really disturbing,” Robert Epstein, Medco’s chief medical officer, said on a conference call with media
  • The poll found very strong support (94%) for the idea that institutions conducting medical and health research-government, universities and private industry-should work together. Americans see such collaboration as leading to greater knowledge, better success rates and faster development of cures and treatments, as well as avoiding duplication and maximizing resources devoted to research and development.
  • This past month researchers at Harvard Medical School published the largest study to date of what has been termed “primary nonadherence” and found that more than 20 percent of first-time patient prescriptions were never filled. According to Dr. Michael A. Fischer, more important factors contributing to nonadherence are likely affordability, physician-patient communication and the cumbersome process of filling out a prescription.

Posted by: Staff on May 22, 2010
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2010-05-20

  • "It's important to note the report finds that having a usual source of medical care, such as a primary care provider, does not affect the number of times people under age 65 visit the emergency department," Dr. Angela Gardner, president of the American College of Emergency Physicians, said of Wednesday's report.

    "In 2007, approximately one in five persons in the U.S. population had one or more emergency department visits in a 12-month period," the report from the National Center for Health Statistics reads.





  • Cultural Competency: Neighborhood Tour and Conference for Researchers took place yesterday with more than 80 researchers in attendance. The tour was provided by Lolly the Trolley and participants were able to choose either a tour through the Stockyards and Asiatown neighborhoods, or Hough and Asiatown neighborhoods. Click the above link to read the article published in today's Plain Dealer.


Posted by: Staff on May 20, 2010
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2010-05-14

Posted by: Staff on May 14, 2010
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2010-05-07

  • When analyzing obesity disparities among women, socioeconomic status and social context may be more important than race, according to a study by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health's Hopkins Center for Health Disparities Solutions.
  • Hospitals need to do a better job of informing patients about charity-care programs that could cover all or some of their medical costs, according to a national report released yesterday. The Access Project and Community Catalyst, two health-advocacy groups based in Boston, surveyed 99 of the nation's almost 5,000 hospitals last summer. The groups found that about 85 percent of hospitals mention charity-care programs to patients, fewer than half provide applications for financial help, and a quarter post eligibility criteria for the programs on their websites. In lieu of paying federal or state taxes, nonprofit hospitals are expected to provide free or discounted medical care to low-income patients.
  • Nearly 80,000 chemicals are in use in the United States, and yet only a few hundred have been tested for safety, the report notes.
  • Avniel Serkin-Ahmed, a youth advocate, spoke of his experience. "When I was a toddler I received my first mental health diagnosis. Determined to make sure that I would have the best and most 'normal' life possible, my mother fought hard to make sure that I received the supports, services and tests that I needed. My mother faced many unnecessary roadblocks throughout the years in order to ensure that I had the services that I needed at a very early age. Receiving these services at an early stage in my life set a great foundation and provided me with the tools that would need to be successful in my future."

Posted by: Staff on May 07, 2010
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2010-04-21

Posted by: Staff on April 21, 2010
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2010-04-06

  • Will the health care reform only help people of color? On Thursday, The Ohio State University Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnicity released a fact sheet (PDF) that explains how recently passed reforms won’t improve the low quality treatment received by racial and ethnic minorities. The fact sheet is discussed in this Mother Jones article.

Posted by: Staff on April 06, 2010
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2010-03-25

  • Not an "end all be all" solution, but perhaps a contribution to ending disparities. Mr. Satcher's discussion is about health insurance and the lack of coverage that contributes to disparities. Unfortunately, there is much more contributing to disparities aside from coverage including patient AND provider education, environment, and cultural issues that are large contributing factors.

Posted by: Staff on March 25, 2010
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2010-03-19

Posted by: Staff on March 19, 2010
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2010-03-17

Posted by: Staff on March 17, 2010
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2010-03-11

Posted by: Staff on March 11, 2010
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2010-02-26

  • Ethnic and racial minorities bear a disproportionate share of America’s diabetes epidemic but are significantly less likely than whites to receive a commonly used test to monitor control of blood glucose....[B]lack and Hispanic patients diagnosed with diabetes are 2 to 3 times less likely than white patients to receive the A1C test during physician office visits. [Washington State University] researchers note that diabetes has become a global epidemic projected to affect 48 million Americans by 2050. Hispanics and blacks are more than twice as likely to develop diabetes and suffer the consequences of insufficient monitoring, say the WSU researchers. 'Earlier this year, the American Diabetes Association announced guidelines encouraging use of the A1C test in both the monitoring and diagnosis of Type 2 diabetes, the most common form of the disease.' (Link courtesy of Michael Massing)
  • The County Health Rankings—the first set of reports to rank the overall health of every county in all 50 states—were released today by the University of Wisconsin’s Population Health Institute and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation at a briefing in Washington, D.C. and on www.countyhealthrankings.org. The 50 state reports help public health and community leaders, policy-makers, consumers and others to see how healthy their county is, compare it with others within their state and find ways to improve the health of their community.

Posted by: Staff on February 26, 2010
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2010-02-11

Posted by: Staff on February 11, 2010
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2010-02-04

  • The legislation aims to remove financial barriers to treatment for people with mental health problems. About 140 million Americans in more than 450,000 employer plans will benefit from improved coverage.
  • A New Jersey study found that African-Americans with cancer are less likely to survive it than whites, and residents of poor neighborhoods less likely to survive than are those in wealthier areas of the state. The racial disadvantage diminishes when socioeconomic status is a consideration, but does not disappear, according to the study in the February issue of the Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved.
    (tags: cancer, race)
  • Melanoma is more than 10 times higher in whites compared to blacks, but over a five-year span, blacks have a 78 percent lower survival rate compared to 92 percent of whites, according to study background material.

Posted by: Staff on February 04, 2010
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2010-02-03

  • The recession is forcing states such as Washington to pare back health insurance programs for low-income people, even as growing joblessness boosts demand for help. Five of six states that use state funds to assist adults not covered by Medicaid are considering cuts, barring new enrollment or raising fees.
  • The February teleconference sponsored by Living Beyond Breast Cancer will focus on the impact culture, wealth and the healthcare system have on the quality of life and survival of women affected by breast cancer. Keynote speaker for this event is Kimlin Ashing-Giwa, PhD. To register, visit their website at http://www.lbbc.org/index.asp and look at the calendar of events.

Posted by: Staff on February 03, 2010
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2010-01-26

  • In the past three decades, obesity among American youths has increased from 5 percent to more than 17 percent. In light of this, the study’s authors suggested that clinicians should be aware of guidelines for lipid screening and treatment among youths.

    Twenty percent of young people aged 12-19 years in the United States have at least one abnormal lipid level, according to a study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Abnormal lipid levels are major risk factors for heart disease, the leading cause of death among adults in the United States.



Posted by: Staff on January 26, 2010
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2010-01-19

  • It is estimated that from 2000 to 2005, at least 330,000 South Africans died prematurely and 35,000 babies were infected with HIV as a result of former president Thabo Mbeki's decision to withhold antiretroviral drugs, based on advice from American AIDS denialists.

Posted by: Staff on January 19, 2010
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2010-01-16

Posted by: Staff on January 16, 2010
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2010-01-08

Posted by: Staff on January 08, 2010
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2010-01-07

Posted by: Staff on January 07, 2010
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2010-01-05

Posted by: Staff on January 05, 2010
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2010-01-04

  • GI symptoms are often overlooked in Autism Spectrum Disorder patients. Autism Research Institute's Director Dr. Stephen Edelson commented, "This is truly a human rights issue; every child deserves proper medical attention--whether or not they have autism. This published report brings much-needed focus to gastrointestinal problems that are commonly associated with the autism spectrum. The conclusions of the report are clear: physicians need to be alert and responsive to such problems when treating these patients; additional research on prevalence, cause, and appropriate treatment is imperative."

Posted by: Staff on January 04, 2010
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-12-29

  • Drugs that have been used for decades are being pushed off the market by the FDA and pharmaceutical companies because the medications pre-date modern drug laws and have never been FDA approved. Medications that used to sell for pennies a pill are now being forced out in favor of "new" brand name medications. The example used in the article is colchicine, a medication used to treat gout and other inflammatory illnesses. The FDA granted URL Pharma and their version of colchicine, Colcrys, "three years exclusivity for treatment of gout - a recurrent arthritic inflammatory disease caused by uric acid buildup - and seven years for FMF under orphan drug rules."
  • East Carolina University is offering a new online program focusing on ethnic and rural health disparities.

    ERHD is a non-credit certificate program designed for health care professionals and others interested in broadening their understanding of health issues and improving their skills in working with ethnic health disparities. The program is composed of 16 modules that may be taken individually or as a full series.





  • CNN video spotlights a restaurant in Harlem that is making headway into bringing healthier options to inner city neighborhoods.




  • If you eat too much, exercise too little, drink too much, smoke, take drugs, fail to wear a seat belt or ignore gun safety, there is only so much a doctor or hospital can do for you.


Posted by: Staff on December 29, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-12-24

  • "The combination of increasing disability rates plus a growing population of older adults emphasizes the importance of prevention of the many chronic conditions giving rise to disability in the first place," said the study's lead author, Esme Fuller-Thomson, professor of social work at the University of Toronto. "There is evidence, for example, that the doubling of obesity rates over the last three decades may be linked to rising disability in older people, yet the obesity problem is largely preventable."

Posted by: Staff on December 24, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-12-23

  • Are kickbacks the way of the future in swaying the swing votes in Congress? The deal critics have dubbed the Cornhusker Kickback is expected to cost the federal government $100 million over 10 years. The multimillion-dollar deals cut with Sen. Ben Nelson (D-Neb.) and others to win the 60 votes needed for the historic health care reform bill gave President Barack Obama the margin he needed to fulfill a central campaign promise — but may also have upped the ante for future presidential horse trading.

Posted by: Staff on December 23, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-12-21

  • New technology provides access to health care while never leaving home or getting a physical exam from a health care provider. Is it really going to provide adequate health care for patients who use that technology since they are never physically examined by a provider?

Posted by: Staff on December 21, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-12-19

Posted by: Staff on December 19, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-12-15

Posted by: Staff on December 15, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-12-12

Posted by: Staff on December 12, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-12-10

Posted by: Staff on December 10, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-12-08

  • Finding Answers: Disparities Research for Change, a national program of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) at the University of Chicago, is awarding more than $1.5 million to seven organizations that are working to eliminate racial and ethnic health care disparities in their communities.

    Each of the final seven grant recipients will receive up to $258,500 to evaluate their proposed interventions aimed at reducing disparities in the health outcomes of patients in their communities. Grantees will focus on cardiovascular disease, depression and diabetes; diseases where evidence of racial and ethnic disparities in care is strong and the recommended standards of care are clear.





  • Dr. Regina Benjamin noted that the proportion of U.S. physicians who are minorities is only 6 percent -- the same proportion as a century ago. ... The numbers come from a 2004 estimate of the percentage of U.S. physicians that are black or Hispanic. Blacks and Hispanics account for roughly 28 percent of the U.S. population, according to 2008 figures from the U.S. Census Bureau. In a 27-minute speech, Benjamin told health leaders in the audience to encourage young minorities to pursue careers in medicine or other ambitions" (Stobbe, 12/3)




  • "Many African-American women don't fit the profile of the average American woman who gets breast cancer. For them, putting off the first mammogram until 50 — as recommended by a government task force — could put their life in danger




  • Albion's 530 students are part of a nationwide effort to combat obesity called "Fuel Up to Play 60" that is sponsored by the National Football League and the National Dairy Council. The school is one of 20 in the state that will receive $5,000 in grants this year to expand the program at their institution.

    Rocky River Middle School and North Olmsted Middle School are also receiving the additional grant money this year.

    Fuel up to Play, launched in October, is designed to give school children a voice in developing nutrition and fitness programs in their schools. The program's major goals are to make more healthy foods available in schools and to encourage the kids to be physically active for 60 minutes a day.



Posted by: Staff on December 08, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-12-02

Posted by: Staff on December 02, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-11-24

  • "Hospitals that disproportionately care for poor patients are less likely than other hospitals to have adopted health information technology," according to an October study published in Health Affairs, American Medical News reports. The economic stimulus legislation in February directed $19 billion in federal investments to help all types of hospitals adopt electronic records, but some researchers are concerned the money may not close that divide.
  • "With an emphasis on caution and patient safety, the DSS position statement boldly advances a revolutionary concept: the legitimacy of gastrointestinal surgery as a dedicated treatment for type 2 diabetes in carefully selected patients," explains lead author Dr. Francesco Rubino, director of the gastrointestinal metabolic surgery program at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical College and associate professor of surgery at Weill Cornell Medical College. "The recommendations from the Diabetes Surgery Summit are an opportunity to improve access to surgical options supported by sound evidence, while also preventing harm from inappropriate use of unproven procedures."
  • A Loyola University Health System study has found that one out of five Type 2 diabetics is morbidly obese -- approximately 100 pounds or more overweight.
  • Greater access to anti-retroviral drugs has helped cut the death toll from HIV by more than 10% over the past five years, latest figures show.
    (tags: HIV)

Posted by: Staff on November 24, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-11-20

Posted by: Staff on November 20, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-11-14

  • Most children actively notice and think about race. A new study has found that children develop an awareness about racial stereotypes early, and that those biases can be damaging.
  • New research published in the November issue of the Journal of the American College of Surgeons shows that African-American patients with colorectal cancer are more likely to be diagnosed with advanced disease and are less likely to undergo surgical procedures compared with Caucasians, suggesting that improvements in screening and rates of operation may reduce differences in colorectal cancer outcomes for African-Americans.

Posted by: Staff on November 14, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-11-12

Posted by: Staff on November 12, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-11-04

Posted by: Staff on November 04, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-10-29

Posted by: Staff on October 29, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-10-28

  • Three studies presented this week at the American College of Gastroenterology's 74th Annual Scientific meeting in San Diego underscore the growing disparities in gastrointestinal disease, particularly colon cancer and Barrett's Esophagus, among certain ethnic and gender populations, including African Americans, Latinos and women. These race- and gender-specific disparities underscore the need for education and vigilance among these populations and perhaps more aggressive screening tactics than the population in general.
  • The study, reported in The Cereal Food Advertising to Children and Teens Score (FACTS) Report, was part funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and was conducted by researchers from Yale University's Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity. It is being presented at Obesity 2009, the 27th annual scientific meeting of The Obesity Society, in Washington on 27 October. One of the findings from the researchers was that not one the cereals targeted to children in the US meets the nutrition standard required to advertise to children in the United Kingdom..
  • The study, published in the Archives of Internal Medicine, examined data from national surveys taken from 1988 to 1994 and a second time period, from 1999 to 2004. In both time periods, men had more heart attacks than women. But the rates in men improved from 2.5% in the first time frame to 2.2% in the second time frame while women’s rates increased from 0.7% to 1%.

Posted by: Staff on October 28, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-10-15

Posted by: Staff on October 15, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-10-14

Posted by: Staff on October 14, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-10-10

Posted by: Staff on October 10, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-10-06

Posted by: Staff on October 06, 2009
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links for 2009-10-02

Posted by: Staff on October 02, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-10-01

Posted by: Staff on October 01, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-09-30

Posted by: Staff on September 30, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-09-29

Posted by: Staff on September 29, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-09-24

  • "While we often hear media reports of genes that account for race differences in health outcomes, genes are but one of many factors that lead to the major health conditions that account for most deaths in the United States," said Thomas LaVeist, PhD, director of the Hopkins Center for Health Disparities Solutions and lead author of the study.

Posted by: Staff on September 24, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-09-19

Posted by: Staff on September 19, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-09-17

Posted by: Staff on September 17, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-09-16

Posted by: Staff on September 16, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-09-14

  • The Joint Center's Health Policy Institute will unveil a study that estimates the direct medical costs of racial inequalities in health status and access to quality care. Findings will include specific estimates on the combined costs of health disparities for minorities over a three-year period (2003-2006), as well as estimates of how much in direct and indirect costs could have been saved in our health care system during that same period if those disparities for minorities had been eliminated.

    WHEN: Thursday, September 17, 2009
    8:00 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.

    The briefing will be available online. To view the live Webcast (8:15 a.m.), visit www.jointcenter.org/hpi



Posted by: Staff on September 14, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-09-11

Posted by: Staff on September 11, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-09-10

  • At a company event yesterday Apple announced a new iPod nano that has a pedometer. The step counts and estimated calories burned data collected by the iPod nano can be sent to the user’s Nike+ iPod account for tracking.
  • Rising obesity rates across the nation have led to worsening health outcomes and increasing inequities in health (1) -72 million American adults are now considered to be overweight or obese.(2) Additionally, economists have identified obesity as a major driver of health care utilization and spending, and contributor to escalating health care costs. In fact, a recent study published in the journal, Health Affairs found that obesity accounts for 9.1 percent of annual health care spending in the United States, nearly $150 billion dollars a year.(3)
  • The research is aiming to promote better understanding about lesbian and bisexual women's experiences of breast cancer and the findings will inform policy development.

    Recommendations will also be made to cancer organisations and other facilities to help improve services.





  • The number of children dying before their fifth birthdays each year has fallen below nine million for the first time on record, a significant milestone in the global effort to improve children’s chances of survival, particularly in the developing world, according to data that Unicef will release on Thursday.


Posted by: Staff on September 10, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-09-08

Posted by: Staff on September 08, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-09-02

Posted by: Staff on September 02, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-08-26

Posted by: Staff on August 26, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-08-25

Posted by: Staff on August 25, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-08-19

Posted by: Staff on August 19, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-08-18

Posted by: Staff on August 18, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-08-13

Posted by: Staff on August 13, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-08-12

Posted by: Staff on August 12, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-08-06

Posted by: Staff on August 06, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-08-05

Posted by: Staff on August 05, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-07-31

  • Book Review in NEJM: The author argues for a "patient-centered bioethics" that pays attention to these problems and maintains a strong alliance with primary care medicine. This is, he contends, "the side of medicine most concerned about talking with and listening to patients and forging long-term relationships" with them. Brody also argues that bioethicists should talk with and listen to communities (not just patients), and in an insightful chapter, he compares and critiques several models of community dialogue.
  • Because Americans in the upper half of the income distribution devote a smaller share of their income to health care, their standards of living have yet to decline, but they, too, will do so in the coming decades if current trends continue. If health care reform based on private health insurance is to be sustainable, it has to be affordable for Americans across the entire income distribution. Achieving this goal will require both substantial cost containment and shifts in the distribution of health care costs within the population.

Posted by: Staff on July 31, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-07-30

Posted by: Staff on July 30, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-07-21

Posted by: Staff on July 21, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-07-17

Posted by: Staff on July 17, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-07-16

Posted by: Staff on July 16, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-07-15

Posted by: Staff on July 15, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-07-14

  • Study reports that when socioeconomics, stage at diagnosis, and type of treatment were considered, race no longer predicted survival.
  • The [stimulus] bill offers medical facilities as much as $64,000 per physician if they make "meaningful use" of "certified" health IT in the next year and a half, and punishes them with cuts to their Medicare reimbursements if they don’t do so by 2015. Obviously, doctors and health administrators are under pressure to act soon. But what is the meaning of "meaningful use"? And who determines which products qualify? These questions are currently the subject of bitter political wrangling.

Posted by: Staff on July 14, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-07-13

  • The existence of health disparities between racial and ethnic groups is common knowledge among public health wonks. But the average American may find the numbers shocking: In impoverished urban areas like Harlem, one-third of black girls and two-thirds of boys who reach their 15th birthdays don't reach their 65th. That's almost triple the rate of early death among average Americans.
  • What happens when you forget to list hypertension as a pre-existing condition? The insurance company doesn't pay for your heart stent.
  • The Georgia Commission on Men's Health released its 2009 report earlier in the week. The study finds men live an average of five fewer years than women, with heart disease, stroke and cancer accounting for more than 50 percent of all male deaths in the state.

Posted by: Staff on July 13, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-07-10

Posted by: Staff on July 10, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-07-09

  • Black women have a lower incidence of breast cancer than white women, but once diagnosed they are more likely to die of the disease. Now, two new studies add to the debate about the roles that access to care and biology play in this disparity.
  • "The greatly elevated risk of disability among Blacks aged 55 to 74 is largely explained by differences in socioeconomic status. Reductions in Black—White health disparities require a better understanding of the mechanisms whereby lower income and education are associated with functional outcomes in older persons."
  • [In the UK] some Parkinson's disease patients are going for years without seeing a specialist doctor or nurse.

Posted by: Staff on July 09, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-07-08

  • [One] selfless act started a chain of events that would allow not just one person to get a desperately needed kidney but eight people to get new organs to keep them alive and thriving.
  • Black women who are diagnosed with breast cancer have a higher probability of dying from the disease than white women, regardless of their estrogen receptor status, according to research from the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health. Differences in breast cancer mortality may reflect racial differences in access and response to innovative breast cancer treatments, as well as other biological and non-biological factors, according to the report. In addition, the researchers found that differences in outcomes in the first few years post-diagnosis make up nearly all of the disparity.
  • Published Tuesday in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, the study found that African-Americans were more likely than others to die of three gender-related cancers -- breast, prostate and ovarian -- even when they received the same advanced care from the same doctors. The researchers say the survival disparity persisted after they controlled for factors such as education and income.
  • Community Based Participatory Research manual now available from CEAL.

Posted by: Staff on July 08, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-07-07

Posted by: Staff on July 07, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-07-06

  • We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all people are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable Rights, that among these are the freedom to direct ones own Life, to provide for ones own Health and to die with dignity—that to assist in providing such rights when otherwise unattainable, health professions are instituted among people, deriving their roles solely from the consent of the people they serve.
  • A free weekend of health care, canceled in May because of worries about the spread of swine flu, has been rescheduled for July 25 and 26 at two locations in Cleveland's University Circle.
  • How many nephrologists does the U.S. need?
  • There remains a 10-12 year gap in life expectancy at birth between indigenous and non-indigenous Australians.

Posted by: Staff on July 06, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-07-02

Posted by: Staff on July 02, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-07-01

  • Health insurance is supposed to offer protection — both medically and financially. But as it turns out, an estimated three-quarters of people who are pushed into personal bankruptcy by medical problems actually had insurance when they got sick or were injured.
  • The widespread use of expensive cancer drugs to prolong patients’ lives by just weeks or months was called into question by an article published Monday in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.
  • The disagreement centers on a critical issue: What’s the best way to cover impoverished Americans? Is it by expanding Medicaid? Or by providing subsidies for the poor to buy private insurance on new health insurance exchanges to be created by the legislation?

Posted by: Staff on July 01, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-06-30

Posted by: Staff on June 30, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-06-29

Posted by: Staff on June 29, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-06-26

Posted by: Staff on June 26, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-06-25

Posted by: Staff on June 25, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-06-24

  • Aboriginal children are among the most marginalized children in Canadian society. Despite some advances, in almost any measure of health and well-being, Aboriginal children – including First Nations, Inuit and Métis -- are at least two or three times worse off than other Canadian children. As children, they are less likely to see a doctor. As teens, they are more likely to become pregnant. And in many communities, they are more likely to commit suicide.
  • Huge geographic differences exist in cancer risk
  • Almost 2.2 million people lived in neighborhoods where pollution raised the risk of developing cancer to levels the government generally considers to be unacceptable. There, toxic chemicals were significant enough that people who breathed the air throughout their lives faced an extra 100-in-1 million risk of getting cancer.
  • The team of more than 30 researchers found that low-income women not only have more chronic diseases -- such as hypertension, arthritis and diabetes -- than their higher income sisters, but that their condition degenerates more quickly.

Posted by: Staff on June 24, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-06-23

Posted by: Staff on June 23, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-06-19

Posted by: Staff on June 19, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-06-18

  • Researchers found that black children with high blood pressure are more likely than other children to develop a thickening of the left chamber of the heart. Known as left ventricular hypertrophy, or LVH, the condition can lead to heart failure, rhythm abnormalities and death.
  • Executives of three of the nation's largest health insurers told federal lawmakers in Washington on Tuesday that they would continue canceling medical coverage for some sick policyholders, despite withering criticism from Republican and Democratic members of Congress who decried the practice as unfair and abusive.
  • Gov. Ted Strickland has floated roughly $2 billion in cuts to help close a $3.2 billion shortfall in the two-year state budget, a plan that would slash health care and other safety-net services for Ohio's poor.
  • People are afraid of losing their insurance in coming year. Nearly one in four people (23.6%) fear losing their health insurance at some point in the next 12 months.

Posted by: Staff on June 18, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-06-17

  • Reacting to a rising tide of anger from gay and lesbian supporters at a series of slights and deferred promises, President Obama will tomorrow extend some benefits to same-sex partners of federal employees.
  • Despite the overwhelming evidence that men are being left behind, the U.S. government has never made a concerted effort to address male health issues. Right now, there are seven (seven!) offices of women's health in the U.S. government: six in the Department of Health and Human Services and one in the Department of Agriculture. And the Pentagon makes huge investments in women's health research. Yet there is not a single federal organization that encourages and disseminates physical and mental health research for and about men.
  • Residents in the poorest neighborhoods of Los Angeles County continue to face living conditions that are significantly more unhealthy than more affluent areas.
  • Executives of three of the nation’s largest health insurers told federal lawmakers Tuesday that they would continue canceling medical coverage for some sick policyholders, despite criticism that the practice is unfair and abusive.

Posted by: Staff on June 17, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-06-16

Posted by: Staff on June 16, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-06-15

Posted by: Staff on June 15, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-06-11

Posted by: Staff on June 11, 2009
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Posted by: Staff on June 10, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-06-09

Posted by: Staff on June 09, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-06-05

  • Tourette syndrome occurs in 3 out of every 1,000 school-aged children, and is more than twice as common in white kids as in blacks or Hispanics
  • The issue of asthma in Puerto Rican Hispanics is critical. They are affected at a greater rate than any other group and no one is sure why. Potential causes include: lack of Spanish speaking health care providers, a genetic disposition, stress from living conditions, cultural practices, or simply sub-standard care.
  • In a study of 41 young people who received a liver transplant, receiving text message reminders helped improve medication compliance. Researchers measured the amount of anti-rejection drugs in the patient's blood. 49% of patients had low levels of anti-rejection medication in the year prior to the study. After they started receiving text messages that number dropped to 15%.
  • An increasing stream of uninsured patients into community health centers throughout Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky has extended waiting times and cut hours at some locations.

Posted by: Staff on June 05, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-06-04

Posted by: Staff on June 04, 2009
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links for 2009-06-03

Posted by: Staff on June 03, 2009
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Posted by: Staff on June 02, 2009
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links for 2009-06-01

Posted by: Staff on June 01, 2009
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links for 2009-05-29

Posted by: Staff on May 29, 2009
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links for 2009-05-28

Posted by: Staff on May 28, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-05-27

Posted by: Staff on May 27, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-05-26

  • Logic says that a referral should depend only on a patient’s needs and the reputation and skill of the physician to which the patient is referred. But medicine is a business too, so that isn’t how it always works in practice.
  • Maybe the answer isn't more money but rather better data collection.
  • Studies show that behaviors from virtual worlds can translate to the real world. Our survey suggests that users are engaged in a range of health-related activities in Second Life which are potentially impacting real-life behaviors. Further research evaluating the impact of health-related activities on Second Life is warranted.
  • "There has been a rapid rise in the number of retail clinics across the United States, but this growth is not evenly distributed across communities," says Craig E. Pollack, MD, MHS, an internist and Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholar at Penn. "Poorer neighborhoods are less likely to have access to these clinics."

Posted by: Staff on May 26, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-05-21

  • Recent decades have seen a remarkable change in the delivery of health care services. Nurse practitioners now have much greater prescribing authority, consumers can purchase more than 700 over-the-counter medications once available only by prescription, and numerous devices have become available that enable a nurse, technician, or consumer -- rather than a physician or a laboratory -- to diagnose or monitor a medical condition.
  • Minorities continue to fight an uphill battle for a career in medicine and science. They are hampered by historically understaffed, underfunded and ill-supplied schools; a lack of career mentorship as well as institutional and historical racism and inadequate financial resources. Despite these obstacles, there are effective ways to reverse the inequities of minorities in medicine.

Posted by: Staff on May 21, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-05-20

Posted by: Staff on May 20, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

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Posted by: Staff on May 19, 2009
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Posted by: Staff on May 18, 2009
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links for 2009-05-15

Posted by: Staff on May 15, 2009
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links for 2009-05-14

  • Thousands of Macedonian citizens, who previously had access only to emergency health care and certain hospital services, are now eligible to receive free primary care through the government. Coverage now extends to vulnerable segments of the population, such as the homeless, the elderly and the unemployed.
  • "What a disgrace that RNs and physicians are shut out and arrested while the insurance industry is given a seat at the table. We would expect that from the Bush administration, not in the time of the Obama administration," said NNOC/CNA Executive Director Rose Ann DeMoro. "The Baucus Committee can arrest nurses, but they cannot silence the voices of RNs who will continue to speak from their hearts on behalf of their patients who want and deserve real reform."
  • University Hospitals became the first Northeast Ohio hospital to reveal how much free care and community benefit it provides -- and the numbers signaled a growing need for low-cost medical care in the region. The health system, which provided its annual report for the past year during an evening gathering Tuesday, said the amount it gives to the community increased to $195 million last year, up 16 percent in 2007.

Posted by: Staff on May 14, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-05-13

  • Since early 2007, and under a mandate from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to dramatically increase HIV testing nationwide, emergency rooms such as S.F. General's are moving toward a day when nearly every patient who enters its doors - whether for chest pain or a broken finger - is offered an HIV test.
  • In 2004, diarrhoea killed 1.8 million children, yet between 2004-2006 only $1.5 billion was spent globally on improved sanitation – vital in the fight to protect children from diarrhoea. In the same period, $10.8 billion was spent on interventions for HIV/AIDS (responsible for 315,000 child deaths), and $3.5 billion on those for malaria (responsible for 840,000 child deaths).
  • Consumer Reports' Nancy Metcalf says that many big-name insurance companies are offering those so-called junk policies. They look like a good deal because the premiums are low—but they're low for a reason. They are so riddled with loopholes, limits, and exclusions that they will not come close to covering your expenses if you ever fall seriously ill. More info at http://blogs.consumerreports.org/health/2009/04/junk-health-insurance-affordable-.html
  • While heterosexual couples typically don’t have to provide marriage licenses to hospitals in order to prove they are husband and wife, same sex couples often must document their relationship to hospital officials before being allowed to take part in a partner’s care.
  • Around the country, hospitals are now affiliated with more than 25 Wal-Mart clinics. The Cleveland Clinic has lent its name and backup services to a string of CVS drugstore clinics in northeastern Ohio. And the Mayo Clinic is in the game, operating one Express Care clinic at a supermarket in Rochester, Minn., and a second one across town at a shopping mall.

Posted by: Staff on May 13, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-05-12

  • Melanoma is the sixth most common cancer in men and women in the United States. This year over 60,000 Americans will develop melanoma. However, the incidence and mortality rate is higher for middle-aged and older men. Nearly 50 percent of melanoma deaths in the United States are in white men 50 years and older.
  • A study of residents of Illinois finds that city dwellers are more likely to have doctors spot breast, colorectal, lung or prostate cancer later in the disease's progression than their peers residing in the suburbs or rural areas.
  • Derek Beeston, Principal Lecturer in Ageing and Mental Health, Centre for Ageing and Mental Health, Staffordshire University, discusses the key issues of ageing and risk factors surrounding older adults and suicide.

Posted by: Staff on May 12, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-05-11

Posted by: Staff on May 11, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-05-08

Posted by: Staff on May 08, 2009
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links for 2009-05-07

Posted by: Staff on May 07, 2009
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links for 2009-05-06

Posted by: Staff on May 06, 2009
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links for 2009-05-05

Posted by: Staff on May 05, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-05-04

  • Concerned about their own job security, many Japanese are seeing the homeless not as troubled individuals seeking handouts, but as victims of a failing economy and a government system that offered no safety nets.
  • Kettering Medical Center and other Kettering Health Network hospitals this year began to consistently request co-pays from patients, including those in their emergency departments.
  • Calls to local pharmacies suggest it's not uncommon for chain stores to charge significantly more for prescriptions for those without insurance. And smaller drug stores - such as the apothecary and other local pharmacies in the Hanover area - charge significantly less.
  • Every BMJ article published since the journal’s first issue in October 1840 is now available online from bmj.com. Introduction video available at http://www.bmj.com/video/stories.dtl

Posted by: Staff on May 04, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-05-01

  • Nearly half of the 428 employers polled said they plan to shift more health costs to employees in 2010.
  • About one in three thought that their doctor would be able to cure their diabetes or that they wouldn't always have diabetes, while most didn't know about the hemoglobin A1C test, a key gauge of long-term blood glucose control.
  • The number of new cancer cases diagnosed each year will jump 45 percent in the next two decades to 2.3 million up from 1.6 million in 2010, affecting many more older adults and minorities
  • The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has proposed changes to its dialysis reimbursement policy, making one lump payment to cover both dialysis and injectable medications, which were previously reimbursed separately. Researchers at the University of Minnesota caution that, because African-American patients require higher doses of costly blood-boosting drugs than Caucasians, facilities may be biased against treating them.

Posted by: Staff on May 01, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-04-30

Posted by: Staff on April 30, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-04-28

  • African Americans have about a one-in-100 chance of developing heart failure while still in their 30s or 40s, a far higher rate than in whites, and their risk of heart failure at that age is closely tied to whether they have hypertension, obesity, or renal dysfunction earlier in adulthood.
  • Young adults have the worst access to mental health care and, despite links between offending behaviour, mental disorders and substance abuse, there are virtually no specialised adolescent forensic mental health services in Australia.
  • The number of Latinos without health coverage is about 10 percent higher in Nevada compared to most states.
  • In an upcoming issue of Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association, researchers report that community health centers refer patients with heart problems to specialists less often than primary care providers in hospitals. It is unclear whether this reflects overuse by hospitals or underuse by community health centers.

Posted by: Staff on April 28, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-04-27

Posted by: Staff on April 27, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-04-24

  • There were 1.4 million Americans diagnosed with cancer last year. About 1,500 die daily from the disease nationwide, according to the Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center. For black women, the cancer death rate is 41 percent higher than white women. For black men with prostate cancer, the death rate is 238 percent higher
  • The World Health Organization says roughly 600 million people worldwide have disabilities. Eighty percent of them live in developing nations where disabilities are often viewed as shameful.
  • In 2005, medical care amenable mortality was the largest source of absolute black-white mortality disparity, contributing 30% of the black-white difference in all cause mortality among men and 42% among women
  • Doctors will triage their conversations with patients, categorizing discussions about advanced directives or risky medications as “high stakes,” and those that occur during routine rounding on a stable patient as “low stakes.” Doctors will then tend to use interpreters in “high stakes” conversations but will muddle through “low stakes” topics themselves, resorting to gestures, mimicry or bilingual family members in order to communicate.

Posted by: Staff on April 24, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-04-22

  • "If we look at the rate of an Aboriginal child dying compared to a non-Aboriginal child dying, the rate of difference is around three to four times that for Aboriginal children for infant mortality, for higher rates of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, childhood injury, suicide, accidental death"
  • State law requires hospitals that receive Hospital Care Assurance Program money to provide free care to patients earning up to the federal poverty level ($22,050 for a family of four). Beyond that, every hospital can decide how much assistance it wants to provide.
  • "There are so many types of payment systems, both public and private, that it's hard to understand," said Silbaugh. "No one pays the same price on anything.""There are so many types of payment systems, both public and private, that it's hard to understand," said Silbaugh. "No one pays the same price on anything."
  • Since Danna Walker lost her $37,000-a-year salary, the government’s recently enacted 65% break on Cobra health-insurance costs would still mean paying $476 a month for continuing coverage.
  • Our proposed reorganization, Medicare Expansion, would build a national care system by expanding on the existing Medicare program for citizens over the age of 65 years, with a gradual phasing out of state administered Medicaid programs. This restructuring would involve gradual changes in the age of eligibility into the Medicare system to include the most needy first, until eventually the entire population is covered. The first step in the Medicare Expansion program would be to enroll children under 5 years of age and pregnant women by the end of 2010.

Posted by: Staff on April 22, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-04-21

  • Globally the impact of poverty is pronounced; over 101 million children are deprived of a primary school education; 26,000 children under the age of 5 die each day, almost entirely due to preventable causes. Children that live with poverty are often said to suffer a double disadvantage, this refers to the fact that there are very strong correlations between poverty and negative outcomes (ill-health, shorter life expectancy, less education): a fact that is true for relative and absolute poverty.
  • "These findings provide strong circumstantial evidence that universal health insurance coverage sharply narrows disparities," wrote Ashwini R. Sehgal, M.D., of Case Western Reserve University, in an accompanying editorial.
  • Twenty percent of Americans say they have delayed or postponed medical care, mostly doctor visits, and many said cost was the main reason
  • Every so often reports on black and minority ethnic (BME) staff or service issues in the NHS are published. Each one is seized on by the media, BME organisations and the NHS itself to see what it has uncovered or recommended, and what its impact may be.

Posted by: Staff on April 21, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-04-20

  • More than one-quarter of Arizona residents do not speak English at home, according to the most recent Census data. Federal laws require any organization that receives government funds to provide interpretation services.
  • There have been substantial disparities in receiving recommended treatments between blacks and whites, and these disparities have been relatively stable without a significant trend of narrowing during the past 12 years. Efforts should focus on providing appropriate quality treatment and educating blacks on the value of having these treatments to reduce these disparities in receipt of treatment for NSCLC.
  • That is the beneficiary's only cost for up to 60 days of Medicare-covered inpatient hospital care in a benefit period. Many beneficiaries buy supplemental policies, known as "Medigap," to pay for deductibles and other costs not covered by Medicare.
  • A new study on patient empowerment in 31 European countries has found that there are great disparities in how health care consumers are treated among the different countries, in areas ranging from access to test results and specialists' opinions to the frequency of under-the-table payment for medical care.

Posted by: Staff on April 20, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-04-17

  • A statewide initiative now being circulated would create two kinds of birth certificates: one for the U.S.-born children of illegal immigrants and one for everyone else. The measure also would deny publicly funded health benefits to the children of illegal immigrants.
  • M. Eileen Collins, 48, of Indianapolis, tried to scrimp on her medication last fall after her husband lost his job and with it their insurance. Without money for insulin, test supplies and other medicines, she asked for free samples and also got a few drugs through $4-a-month generic programs. But she stopped taking most of her drugs and cut her insulin doses in half to stretch her budget.
  • Health researcher fired because he didn't delay report on health disparities.
  • "The results of this study possibly reflect negative views, attitudes and behaviour of healthcare professionals towards older patients," say the authors, adding that: "rationing of care on the basis of age has occurred in other medical areas."

Posted by: Staff on April 17, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-04-16

Posted by: Staff on April 16, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-04-14

  • "Today's economic woes are like none any of us have ever seen and the same is true for hospitals," said Caroline Steinberg, vice president for trends analysis at the American Hospital Association. "People are scared."
  • More and more, doctors and other health practitioners are asking patients — even those with insurance — to pay their share of the costs up front, either before they are treated or before they leave the office.
  • Black patients suffering from lung cancer are less likely to receive recommended chemotherapy and surgery than white lung cancer patients, a disparity that shows no signs of lessening.

Posted by: Staff on April 14, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-04-13

Posted by: Staff on April 13, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-04-09

Posted by: Staff on April 09, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-04-08

Posted by: Staff on April 08, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-04-07

Posted by: Staff on April 07, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-04-06

  • The continuing lack of appropriately-trained interpreter services for migrant women has been highlighted in the media in the last couple of years, including one case of a young son who had to translate for his mother, who had just had a miscarriage.
  • One in five Americans does not have a family doctor and even many who do often are shut out of care, translating to higher rates of illness and death, and higher costs.
  • “Although we have made advances in reducing health disparities among minorities, we need to continue to work to eliminate these disparities. Statistics show minorities are heavily impacted by STDs, which is one of the reason numerous Minority Health Month events are focusing on education and awareness of STD/HIV/AIDS.
  • Experts warn that driven by profits from selling medicine, some doctors from Indonesia to Hong Kong are overprescribing medicines, a practice they say will be disastrous in the longer term.

Posted by: Staff on April 06, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-04-03

Posted by: Staff on April 03, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-04-02

Posted by: Staff on April 02, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-04-01

  • Poor harvests, drought and rising food prices could have serious health implications for people living in developing countries
  • Reed said a study of third-graders in Ohio showed the average body mass index, a scale for measuring obesity, is higher among those children living in rural areas. And adults in rural areas also are going without proper medical care. Reed said the diabetes rate in adults is 45 percent higher in rural areas of Ohio and heart disease rates are 52 percent higher.
  • If you have been a patient at one of Walgreens in-store clinics, you lose your job and have no health insurance, the clinic will treat you -- and qualifying family members -- for the rest of 2009 for free.
  • the rate of graft failure among African Americans was approximately 2-fold higher than for white patients over the entire study period. Graft survival has improved slightly more for African American than white pediatric patients over the past 25 years. However, graft survival for African American pediatric patients remains poor compared with white patients.
  • Are There Enough Doctors in My Rural Community? Perceptions of the Local Physician Supply

Posted by: Staff on April 01, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-03-31

  • Reform of the U.S. healthcare system is vital this year because of growing costs and worsening care, the Health and Human Services Department said in a report on Monday.
  • The idea that mammography may do more harm than good may be alien to many American women.
  • The watchdog said NHS trusts must do more to meet their legal obligations to promote race equality following a review, which showed that examples of good practice existed but many trusts fell short on meeting basic requirements.
  • The African National Congress (ANC) plans to introduce national health insurance in its next term in government, party president Jacob Zuma said on Tuesday.
  • The prevalence of diabetes is at least twice as high in some ethnic groups as it is in whites. This is true even among people with similar body mass index (BMI) numbers, a large new study finds.

Posted by: Staff on March 31, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-03-30

Posted by: Staff on March 30, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-03-27

Posted by: Staff on March 27, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-03-26

  • Health disparities between indigenous and non-indigenous Australians will not end unless racism is tackled
  • A funny thing happened on the way to passage of Timothy's Law, which requires health insurers to provide coverage for mental illnesses. State legislators exempted three of New York's publicly subsidized health programs for low-income residents.
  • Inequality goes hand in hand with the social diseases that blight whole communities. The rational conclusion to be drawn from the mass of evidence that Richard Wilkinson and Kate Pickett have assembled is that all of us, irrespective of income, have much to gain from the creation of a more equal society.
  • In Wisconsin, American Indians have the highest rate of diabetes, at almost six times the rate of whites. African Americans and Hispanics have the second and third highest rates, nearly one and a half times more than whites, respectively. Asians have a diabetes rate just slightly higher than whites.

Posted by: Staff on March 26, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-03-25

Posted by: Staff on March 25, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-03-24

  • Community health centers saw a significant increase in patient load amid the state's efforts to improve health coverage by expanding public programs and making private insurance more affordable.
  • No one can deny the differences between ethnic groups when it comes to culture and language. But it seems race can dictate one's health, too. Some examples:
  • The worldwide epidemic of tuberculosis is mainly found in third world countries and is being monitored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). About 1.5 million people die of TB every year. South Africa recently has been hit the hardest (infections of TB have almost tripled) because of the also high rate of HIV in people living there because treatment is expensive and ongoing and the patient’s immune systems are weakened.
  • A small recent study of refugees in schools in Stockholm found that Somalis were in classes for autistic children at three times the normal rate.

Posted by: Staff on March 24, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-03-23

  • Black patients wait longer for hospital beds after being admitted into the emergency department than patients of other races
  • African Americans have a shorter life expectancy than whites, and cancer plays a major role in this disparity. African Americans are more prone to get cancer; they tend to present at a later, deadlier stage; and they have poorer survival rates after diagnosis.
  • Despite the fact that colorectal cancer screening among Medicare patients is increasing, gaps still remain between whites — who are screened most frequently — and other racial and ethnic groups, according to a new study by the University of California, Davis and the University of Washington. The biggest gap is between whites and Hispanics, who are screened at 47% and 33%, respectively. Asians and Pacific Islanders were screened at 42%, and blacks, 38%.
  • IF YOU THINK this is the era of e-government and transparency, it's time to think again. Hard as it is to imagine, there's a move afoot in Congress to take away the public's free online access to tax-funded medical research findings.

Posted by: Staff on March 23, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-03-20

Posted by: Staff on March 20, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-03-19

Posted by: Staff on March 19, 2009
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links for 2009-03-18

Posted by: Staff on March 18, 2009
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links for 2009-03-17

Posted by: Staff on March 17, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-03-16

Posted by: Staff on March 16, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-03-13

  • A new report by an independent watchdog group says inmates in New York State's 70 prisons lack adequate access to health care.
  • High blood pressure accounts for some of the disproportionately higher mortality rates among African American women with breast cancer compared with their Caucasian counterparts, according to an article in the International Journal of Cancer.
  • Restaurant group to challenge ruling that businesses with 20 more more employees have to offer health benefits.
  • With Inuit women three times more likely to die from cervical cancer than other Canadian women, it is clear that there is a vast health discrepancy here.
  • While the doctors were aware that dying patients might feel abandoned and even took what they believed were steps to prevent it, patients and their caregivers continued to feel abandoned by their doctors both in the period leading up to and at the time of death.

Posted by: Staff on March 13, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-03-12

Posted by: Staff on March 12, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-03-11

Posted by: Staff on March 11, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-03-10

  • More than three-quarters of adult Americans who have health insurance say they still worry about paying more for their medical care, and nearly 50 percent say they're "very" or "extremely" worried about the issue
  • “We have to face up to the fact that individual and collective mental health and well-being depends on reducing the gap between rich and poor. A large divide leads to a mentally unhealthy society, and many associated social problems. In the UK in particular, we’ve failed to acknowledge this link, preferring instead to blame the health and social conditions of those living on or near the poverty line on their own lifestyle choices.”
  • Dangling a financial carrot in front of doctors as a way to improve health quality has changed the way some doctors practice medicine, but has yet to significantly improve quality and may be interfering with doctor-patient relationships
  • In what may be an ominous sign for retail clinics, CVS Caremark has closed about 90 of some 550 MinuteClinic locations until the next flu season or other “seasonal” needs demand their services

Posted by: Staff on March 10, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-03-09

Posted by: Staff on March 09, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-03-06

  • Sick or injured African-American patients wait about an hour longer than patients of other races before being transferred to an inpatient hospital bed following emergency room visits, according to a new national study published in the journal Academic Emergency Medicine
  • The study suggests that independent grocery stores can improve access to healthy foods in areas where supermarket chains choose not to venture. Having a large grocery store in the neighborhood boosted the average fruit and vegetable intake by 0.69 servings per day.
  • Physicians for a National Health Program, a group of docs that claims 15,000 members and supports a single-payer system, had planned to demonstrate outside the White House today over what they said was the exclusion of single-payer advocates from the White House’s health-reform summit. But yesterday, PNHP canceled the protest — after the group’s president was invited to today’s meeting. Rep. John Conyers (D-Mich.), who backs a Medicare-for-All bill in Congress, was also invited.
  • “Place of residence plays a larger role in dietary health than previously estimated,” said Manuel Franco, MD, PhD, lead author of the studies and an associate with the Bloomberg School’s Department of Epidemiology. “Our findings show that participants who live in neighborhoods with low healthy food availability are at an increased risk of consuming a lower quality diet. We also found that 24 percent of the black participants lived in neighborhoods with a low availability of healthy food compared with 5 percent of white participants.”

Posted by: Staff on March 06, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-03-05

Posted by: Staff on March 05, 2009
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links for 2009-03-04

Posted by: Staff on March 04, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-03-03

Posted by: Staff on March 03, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-03-02

  • Washington’s Death with Dignity Act will take effect in four days, and doctors, pharmacists and health facility administrators are scrambling to figure out exactly what the law says and how they’re going to deal with it.

Posted by: Staff on March 02, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-02-27

Posted by: Staff on February 27, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-02-26

Posted by: Staff on February 26, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-02-25

  • More Americans will lose their health insurance as the economy weakens, health care becomes more expensive and fewer employers offer coverage, the U.S. Institute of Medicine said in a report on Tuesday.
  • Health care costs will top $8,000 per person this year, consuming an ever-bigger slice of a shrinking economic pie, says the report by the Department of Health and Human Services, due out today.

Posted by: Staff on February 25, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-02-24

  • Deep disparities also exist for nonwhite elders, some tracing to historical injustices that kept minorities from union jobs that offered pensions or steered them to low-paying manual work, according to the study. Seven out of 10 Latino and African-American senior citizens, and six out of 10 Asians, live below the survival standard.
  • Women are 30 percent less likely than men to receive a critical clot-busting drug than can limit brain damage after a stroke, according to a Michigan State University study.
  • Colon cancer patients who seek out more information about their care are more likely to be prescribed cutting-edge, expensive medications that aren't necessarily the best drugs for them, new research shows.

Posted by: Staff on February 24, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-02-23

Posted by: Staff on February 23, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-02-19

Posted by: Staff on February 19, 2009
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links for 2009-02-18

Posted by: Staff on February 18, 2009
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links for 2009-02-17

Posted by: Staff on February 17, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-02-13

Posted by: Staff on February 13, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-02-12

Posted by: Staff on February 12, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-01-28

Posted by: Staff on January 28, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-01-27

  • Western Pennsylvania has the highest rate of blacks progressing to end-stage renal disease, or complete kidney failure, according to the latest report from the U.S. Renal Data System.
  • Based on all three approaches for measuring disparities, researchers found that disparities between Hispanics and whites for two broad indicators of health care increased between 1996 and 2005, while disparities between blacks and whites remained roughly constant.
  • Drama over language requirements for the head of an improved trauma network in China.

Posted by: Staff on January 27, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-01-23

Posted by: Staff on January 23, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-01-22

  • Panelists who took part in a December 2008 webcast hosted by the Kaiser Family Foundation voiced optimism that as president, Barack Obama will work to eliminate ethnic and racial disparities in health care.
  • Under a plan passed Wednesday by the State Council, China is set to spend more than $120 billion in the next few years to build hospitals and clinics as part of an effort to provide basic, universal health care. The government will also subsidize insurance to extend coverage to more of its citizens.
  • Dramatic improvements in U.S. air quality over the last two decades have added 21 weeks to the life of the average American, researchers reported on Wednesday.
  • Obama said he would address the disparity in Medicare and Medicaid reimbursement rates, in which rural providers often get paid less than their urban counterparts when they perform the same procedure.
  • Among patients with lung cancer, black patients are less likely than white patients to undergo recommended lung resection, but the disparity in treatment does not appear to have an impact on outcomes, according to research published in the January issue of the Archives of Surgery.
  • The recession has squeezed virtually all sectors and demographic groups. But black men, who have always faced higher unemployment rates than the national average, are taking a harder hit, data show.
  • People who live in poorer neighborhoods in the U.S. are less likely to have easy access to supermarkets carrying a wide variety of fresh produce and other healthy food, an analysis of 54 studies confirms.
  • As President Obama gets down to the business of increasing patients’ access to health coverage, some liberals in Congress are suggesting he take a page from the Bush administration’s playbook: expand community health centers.

Posted by: Staff on January 22, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-01-21

  • Children who suffer physical abuse, death of a parent or other childhood adversity and are anxious or depressed are at increased risk of developing asthma in adulthood, a study suggests.
  • Gordon Brown hailed the 'momentous day' for the NHS as the first Constitution ends the era of doctor knows best with list of rights and responsibilities for patients and staff.
  • The new president has spoken eloquently and accurately on the problems plaguing many minority communities. But he knows that it takes more than words to bring about change. That’s why, to fulfill his promise of a new, better America, the number one priority should be to fix the nation’s massive health care disparities as soon as he takes office.
  • Obama’s health care reform are focused on access, with cost second and quality somehow tied in. He didn’t mention access at all, and he tied quality and cost to science and technology.
  • Slowly, and somewhat surprisingly, health care is atwitter.

Posted by: Staff on January 21, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-01-20

  • Women are less likely to receive kidney transplants than men, and researchers at Johns Hopkins have found that this gap primarily affects older women — even though they fare as well or better than men their age after a transplant.
  • The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is a failed agency that the public should not trust, Cleveland Clinic’s Dr. Steven Nissen told The Plain Dealer in a preview of a talk he’s giving Monday.
  • Three-quarters of children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes had insufficient levels of vitamin D in a study conducted by researchers at Joslin Diabetes Center.
  • A new study from the Health Department reveals huge gaps in the care that New Yorkers with diabetes receive. If we see this in a city that is pro-active in diabetes care, then what is happening in the rest of the U.S.?

Posted by: Staff on January 20, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-01-16

  • In a year-long study conducted in Dallas County, Texas, women who called 911 for suspected heart-related symptoms had a 52 percent greater likelihood of experiencing delays in emergency medical services (EMS) compared with their male counterparts, even after adjusting for a number of factors.
  • Rural residents are more likely to suffer from diabetes by 16% than their city-dwelling counterparts, according to a first-of-its-kind study by researchers at the University of Illinois College of Medicine at Rockford.

Posted by: Staff on January 16, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-01-15

  • Even as President-elect Barack Obama plans an ambitious push to expand health coverage nationwide, states are slashing health services to their poorest residents amid the economic downturn.
  • Hispanic voters turned out in droves last fall to elect Barack Obama and his Democratic allies on Capitol Hill. Those allies get their first chance to return the favor on Wednesday when the House takes up a children’s health care measure that would grant Medicaid coverage to children of new immigrants whose families came to the U.S. legally.
  • India's fight to lower maternal and child mortality rates is failing due to growing social inequalities and shortages in primary healthcare facilities despite an economic boom, the United Nations said on Thursday.
  • Under the [California] law, which took effect Jan. 1, health insurers are required to provide patients who lack English comprehension with an on-site interpreter or access to one through telephone or Web-hosted videoconferencing.
  • More than half a million expectant and new mothers die each year, most in Africa and Asia where obstetrical and post-natal care is often unavailable and many pregnancies are complicated by HIV.

Posted by: Staff on January 15, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-01-14

  • The reality of social change during the civil rights period is more complicated and more accessible than any savior myth. Social change begins from the bottom up, with everyday people joining together to make a change. They learn the necessary tools for investigation as well as for resolving conflicts in a nonviolent fashion and for engaging the community.
  • Although more families are finding that they qualify for coverage for their children, many of the parents still make too much money to qualify for government-sponsored coverage, such as Medicaid, for themselves. The increase in requests for assistance also burdens already stretched state budgets.
  • Surveillance data show higher rates of reported STDs among some minority racial or ethnic groups when compared with rates among whites.

Posted by: Staff on January 14, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2009-01-13

Posted by: Staff on January 13, 2009
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links for 2009-01-10

Posted by: Staff on January 10, 2009
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links for 2009-01-08

Posted by: Staff on January 08, 2009
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links for 2009-01-07

Posted by: Staff on January 07, 2009
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links for 2009-01-06

Posted by: Staff on January 06, 2009
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links for 2009-01-05

Posted by: Staff on January 05, 2009
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links for 2009-01-02

Posted by: Staff on January 02, 2009
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-12-31

Posted by: Staff on December 31, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-12-30

Posted by: Staff on December 30, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-12-29

  • Partners HealthCare, the umbrella organization over Massachusetts General and Brigham and Women’s hospitals in Boston, tends to get substantially heftier fees from insurers than other hospitals in the area.
  • A majority of Maryland's hospitals have received surpluses from free and unpaid care in recent years, though they are supposed to break even in the long run.

Posted by: Staff on December 29, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-12-23

Posted by: Staff on December 23, 2008
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links for 2008-12-22

Posted by: Staff on December 22, 2008
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links for 2008-12-19

Posted by: Staff on December 19, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-12-17

  • When supporters of President-elect Barack Obama hold house parties to discuss ways of fixing the health care system over the next two weeks, they may find some unexpected guests. The health insurance industry is encouraging its employees and satisfied customers to attend.
  • The incidence of colorectal cancer is declining in the United States, but blacks are developing the disease and dying of it at higher rates than whites, and the racial gap is widening, the American Cancer Society has reported.
  • According to researchers discussing the issue during a session on emergency department crowding at the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) Scientific Assembly held here in October, the current system of offering hospital beds on a first-come, first-served basis favors patients undergoing elective procedures that are scheduled sometimes days or weeks in advance. These patients also are more profitable to a hospital than patients admitted through the emergency department.

Posted by: Staff on December 17, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-12-16

Posted by: Staff on December 16, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-12-15

  • ...physicians and other health-care providers are facing language and other barriers arising from fast growth in Nashville's immigrant population. As a result, they're hiring interpreters and front-desk staff who speak languages from Arabic to Somali, signing up for services that offer telephone-based translators or send in-person interpreters, or adding satellite clinics in diverse areas of Nashville.
  • Relatively low earnings, rising overhead and overwhelming patient loads are sending veteran primary care physicians into early retirement and driving medical students into better-paying specialties, creating what the New England Journal of Medicine recently called a crisis.
  • Colorectal cancer diagnoses and deaths have fallen in the United States this decade, but the gap in progress between whites and blacks is widening, the American Cancer Society said on Monday.

Posted by: Staff on December 15, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-12-12

Posted by: Staff on December 12, 2008
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links for 2008-12-11

Posted by: Staff on December 11, 2008
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links for 2008-12-10

Posted by: Staff on December 10, 2008
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Posted by: Staff on December 09, 2008
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Posted by: Staff on December 06, 2008
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Posted by: Staff on December 03, 2008
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Posted by: Staff on December 02, 2008
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Posted by: Staff on December 01, 2008
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links for 2008-11-26

Posted by: Staff on November 26, 2008
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links for 2008-11-25

Posted by: Staff on November 25, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-11-24

  • Financial incentives for doctors can improve the management of coronary heart disease and reduce ethnic differences in quality of and access to care, according to public health experts in the UK.
  • ...students have been trying for six years to get the administration to tighten its conflicts policies, both in the classroom and at the affiliated hospitals where the students train. One idea they’re pushing is to require faculty and students, while talking about drugs in the classroom, to disclose any ties to the makers of those drugs.
  • ...fifth graders living in public housing did worse on standardized math and reading tests than fifth graders who lived elsewhere. Researchers found this disparity in fifth-grade test scores even when comparing students at the same school who shared similar demographics, like race, gender and poverty status.
  • In one instance, the lawsuit said, the middle schooler's soccer coach asked the girl whether she had AIDS, then told her the team could use her HIV status to its advantage because "the other team will be afraid."

Posted by: Staff on November 24, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-11-21

Posted by: Staff on November 21, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-11-20

  • Employers are dramatically shifting healthcare costs onto workers, so much so that the average annual deductible for an individual surpassed $1,000 for the first time this year, according to a new study.
  • According to the results of a large depression treatment study, published n the November issue of Psychiatric Services, minorities with depression have limited access to treatment. Those who seek treatment receive inadequate care. The findings reveal that even when variables such as poverty, insurance coverage, and education were taken into account, ethnicity and race still impacted treatment.
  • The Saskatoon Health Region report, Health disparity in Saskatoon: Analysis to intervention, says putting more health services in the inner city alone won't close the health gap between the rich and poor -- a broader cultural shift will be needed.

Posted by: Staff on November 20, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-11-19

  • As Democrats in Congress consider covering more of the uninsured kids by expanding Medicaid, they may want to consider this: Fewer doctors are accepting Medicaid patients not just because fees are so low, but because it often takes months to get paid.
  • 60 percent of 12,000 general practice physicians would not recommend medicine as a career.
  • U.S. doctors seem to be fed up. Within the next three years, a new survey shows, almost half are considering cutting back on patients or simply halting their practice. Already, more than three-quarters say, there's a shortage of primary care doctors.

Posted by: Staff on November 19, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-11-17

Posted by: Staff on November 17, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-11-14

Posted by: Staff on November 14, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-11-13

Posted by: Staff on November 13, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-11-12

  • The American Medical Association’s House of Delegates voted Monday to undertake a study of the repatriation of uninsured immigrant patients by hospitals, a practice that has been examined by The New York Times in two recent reports.
  • Without waiting for President-elect Barack Obama, Senator Max Baucus, the chairman of the Finance Committee, will unveil a detailed blueprint on Wednesday to guarantee health insurance for all Americans by facilitating sales of private insurance, expanding Medicaid and Medicare, and requiring most employers to provide or pay for health benefits.
  • Australia's public hospitals are unsafe, overcrowded and underfunded, resulting in 1,500 unnecessary deaths a year, a national doctors group said on Wednesday in a report titled "Public Hospitals Flatlining."

Posted by: Staff on November 12, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-11-11

  • As General Motors faces a liquidity crisis many of the company’s retirees are trying to navigate Medicare and plan for their own finances in the wake of the company’s decision to drop its lifetime health coverage for some 100,000 white-collar retirees.
  • The lives of 8,000 black Americans could be saved each year if doctors could figure out a way to bring their average blood pressure down to the average level of whites, a new study found.
  • Hospitals everywhere in America - public, non-profit institutions as well as private, profit-making ones-routinely charge the uninsured, the people who have no clout, the most. How much more? On average, five times as much, according to K.B. Forbes, a patient-rights advocate who has spent the last three years analyzing and securing reductions in the hospital bills of uninsured working people from California to Florida.

Posted by: Staff on November 11, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-11-10

Posted by: Staff on November 10, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-11-07

Posted by: Staff on November 07, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-11-06

Posted by: Staff on November 06, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-11-04

Posted by: Staff on November 04, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-10-31

  • A study surveying patients in more than 1,500 physician practices has found racial and ethnic disparities in patient experiences, with minority patients having worse experiences than white patients. The findings suggest that while all doctors should be attentive to differences in patient experiences, Hispanic, Native American, and black patients are often visiting physician practices that are less patient-centered.
  • The investigators found that Black Canadians were significantly less likely than Caucasians to receive a kidney transplant, either from deceased or living donors. This situation mimics that seen in the United States. However, unlike African-Americans, Black Canadians who underwent a kidney transplant experienced no significant health differences compared with Caucasians after their procedure. Their transplanted kidneys survived just as long as kidneys transplanted into Caucasians, and Black Canadians actually survived longer following the surgery compared with Caucasians.

Posted by: Staff on October 31, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-10-30

  • Opponents say the measure could have unintended consequences, including driving up Medicaid costs. Supporters say it will keep the state from encroaching on the private sector.
  • Chinese AIDS victims are dying needlessly because a "tragic stigma" prevents them seeking help in a country where one fifth of people think the disease can be passed on by sharing a toilet, a top activist said on Thursday.
  • Our recent study of income-related inequalities in limiting long-term illness found the least generous Anglo-Saxon welfare states, England and Ireland, exhibited the largest health inequalities.
  • Striking new evidence has emerged of a widespread gap in the cost of health insurance, as women pay much more than men of the same age for individual insurance policies providing identical coverage, according to new data from insurance companies and online brokers.

Posted by: Staff on October 30, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-10-29

Posted by: Staff on October 29, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-10-24

  • Faced with a projected $500-million deficit this coming year, Ontario's finance minister announced that it will slow down the hiring of 9,000 nurses in order to save $50 million.
  • "The Cure," written and directed by student Anthony Onah. It's about a single mother whose young son is injured in an accident while she is at work. The family has no insurance, pulling them into an insurance nightmare almost as bad as the child's physical nightmare.

Posted by: Staff on October 24, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-10-23

Posted by: Staff on October 23, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-10-22

  • In 1980, black women and white women in Chicago with breast cancer were equally likely to die. Since then, death rates for white patients have improved dramatically. But that is not the case for their African-American counterparts, who are now dying at a rate 116 percent higher, according to data released Wednesday by the Metropolitan Chicago Breast Cancer Task Force.

Posted by: Staff on October 22, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-10-21

Posted by: Staff on October 21, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-10-20

Posted by: Staff on October 20, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-10-17

Posted by: Staff on October 17, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-10-16

  • In California, the fight is over balance billing patients who go to emergency rooms at hospitals that aren’t in their insurer’s network. Predictably enough, the insurers argue that the hospitals charge inflated rates for these patients, while the hospitals say the insurers only pay a pittance.
  • Infant mortality in the United States remains higher than in many other industrialized countries, with progress stalling this decade, the U.S. government said on Wednesday.

Posted by: Staff on October 16, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-10-15

  • The World Health Organization is urging governments to adopt primary health care and universal coverage as the best ways of improving health and saving lives.
  • An e-mail survey of 1,767 adults currently being treated for cancer found 569 respondents with late-stage cancer. Of those, 12% said they passed up recommended treatment because it was too expensive.
  • More than 20 Chicago medical and public health organizations came together to provide an interactive approach to the health disparity problem in the city. They were taught to pay more attention to cultural influences on health, low levels of health literacy in the public and how even the smallest of biases can affect quality of care.
  • Under new state rules that take effect today, hospitals and physicians are barred from billing patients for the balance of emergency care not covered by insurers.

Posted by: Staff on October 15, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-10-14

Posted by: Staff on October 14, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-10-09

  • The drug maker Pfizer earlier this decade manipulated the publication of scientific studies to bolster the use of its epilepsy drug Neurontin for other disorders, while suppressing research that did not support those uses, according to experts who reviewed thousands of company documents for plaintiffs in a lawsuit against the company.
  • Boston University Goldman School of Dental Medicine has received a $14.5 million grant to fund the Center for Research to Evaluate and Eliminate Dental Disparities until 2015.
  • In 1960, the U.S. ranked 11th in the world in infant mortality rate. In 2004, it was 29th. Further, in 1960 white Americans on their own would have ranked 11th in the world in that category, while African Americans would have been 30th. In 2004, white Americans would have ranked 26th, while African Americans had fallen to 35th.
  • Three men who say they have adequate health coverage and enough money to pay for their health care needs want to opt out of hospital coverage under Medicare. Federal rules say they cannot collect Social Security benefits if they do that.

Posted by: Staff on October 09, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-10-08

  • Universal health care is, however, a moral obligation for an industrialized society, and will not result in the apocalyptic consequences promised by the jeremiads.
  • Survival after a head and neck cancer diagnosis lags for African-Americans and the poor, researchers here said.
  • Discussing the disparity between mental health care and general medicine in the country, Duckworth said the bias against mental illness goes beyond the institutions — hospitals, insurance companies, states — and encompasses society.
  • The statistics are startling: One out of every 166 children nationwide has some form of autism, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
  • Asthma patients who are black tend to have more severe disease than asthma patients who are white, leading to more asthma control problems, higher rates of emergency department visits, and overall worse quality of life.

Posted by: Staff on October 08, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-10-06

Posted by: Staff on October 06, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-10-03

Posted by: Staff on October 03, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-10-02

Posted by: Staff on October 02, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-09-30

Posted by: Staff on September 30, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-09-29

Posted by: Staff on September 29, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-09-26

Posted by: Staff on September 26, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-9-25

  • A slew of recent reports, including one released today, show that more people are having problems paying their medical bills, that costs of insurance and hospital beds continue to rise and that fewer people are filling prescriptions and going to the doctor.
    (tags: )
  • As it stands, a person with a physical illness is apt to have a much lower deductible than a person with a mental illness. Co-pays for seeing a mental health specialist are apt to be higher than for seeing other specialists. And mental health patients often find that only a set number of visits to a psychologist or a psychiatrist will be covered.
    (tags: )
  • Evidence is mounting that the current economic climate has led to reductions in health spending .
    (tags: )

Posted by: Staff on September 25, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-09-23

  • Doctors provide little in the way of empathy, even when their patients seem to ask for it, according to a study in the Sept. 22 Archives of Internal Medicine. Researchers looked at real doctor/patient encounters between 137 patients and their oncologists or thoracic surgeons from a Veterans Affairs hospital.
  • Contrary to public perceptions, foreign-born children are increasingly uninsured, rather than publicly insured, in the wake of immigration policy changes, according to a study by public health researchers at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.
  • New York City plans to expand primary health care facilities in 11 high-poverty areas, City Council Speaker Christine C. Quinn announced on Monday, saying she hoped to put $26 million toward the effort in the next four years, city finances permitting.

Posted by: Staff on September 23, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-09-20

Posted by: Staff on September 20, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-09-18

Posted by: Staff on September 18, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-09-16

  • A vast majority of emergency room patients are discharged without understanding the treatment they received or how to care for themselves once they get home, researchers say.
  • Several sources of frustration underlie doctor-hospital disputes. One is financial: Many physicians, including myself, are earning less these days as a result of diminishing reimbursements from health insurers, more uninsured patients, the high cost of medical liability insurance and the rising costs of maintaining a private practice.

Posted by: Staff on September 16, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-09-12

  • "The male-to-male sexual contact transmission category represented 72 percent of new infections among males, including 81 percent of new infections among whites, 63 percent among blacks, and 72 percent among Hispanics," the report said.
  • Grassley is leaning on NIH to get tougher with the researchers and universities receiving government grants. “Starting today, the NIH could send a signal that business as usual is over,” Grassley said. “The simple threat of losing prestigious and sizable NIH grants would force accurate financial disclosure.”

Posted by: Staff on September 12, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-09-11

Posted by: Staff on September 11, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-09-10

  • A majority of the students surveyed also said they don't think adequate health care is a guaranteed right or that access to health care is a problem in the U.S....
  • A new system that assigned a medical home to patients, usually a primary care practice, cut hospital admissions by 20 percent and costs by 7 percent....

Posted by: Staff on September 10, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-09-08

Posted by: Staff on September 08, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-09-04

Posted by: Staff on September 04, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-09-03

Posted by: Staff on September 03, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-8-29

Posted by: Staff on August 29, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-8-27

  • A Case Study of Intra-institutional Determinants of Uncompensated Care at Healthcare Institutions With Differing Ownership Models.
    (tags: )
  • African-American children are 40 percent less likely to have preventive dental sealants than their white classmates. Among adults aged 35 to 44 years, 40 percent of African-Americans have tooth decay as compared to 23 percent of whites, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.
    (tags: )

Posted by: Staff on August 27, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-8-26

Posted by: Staff on August 26, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-08-25

Posted by: Staff on August 25, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-08-23

Posted by: Staff on August 23, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-8-22

Posted by: Staff on August 22, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-08-21

Posted by: Staff on August 21, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-08-13

Posted by: Staff on August 13, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-08-12

  • The NHS enters its 61st year in pretty good shape. However, despite improvements in health, there are enduring and widening health inequalities which should dampen the birthday celebrations.
  • Volunteer clinicians play a critical role in the current U.S. safety-net health care system and in many health care coverage expansion proposals. Yet, bureaucracy and red tape make it excruciatingly difficult for well-intentioned clinicians to donate their time.
  • The president of the Navajo Nation has vetoed a ban on smoking and chewing tobacco in public places.
  • As an African American woman, a physician, and a reproductive-health specialist, I see on a daily basis the real-life consequences of unequal access to good health care.
  • When we wrote last month about some new rules mandating better manners among hospital staff, it didn't occur to us that doctors were actually throwing scissors.

Posted by: Staff on August 12, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-8-11

  • People who've exchanged wedding vows tend to be healthier than their single, divorced or widowed peers, but new research shows that health gap may be narrowing.
    (tags: )
  • Blogs written by medical professionals may pose a threat to patient privacy, because the authors of the blogs may inadvertently reveal patient information, says a U.S. study that's the first to examine the issue.
    (tags: )
  • A new report says Pacific Islanders are more likely than other King County ethnic groups to smoke, to have premature and unhealthy babies, to die young, and to be obese and poor.
    (tags: )

Posted by: Staff on August 11, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-08-08

Male and Female Adult Population Health Status in China
Males had better health status than females in terms of self-perceived wellbeing, presence of illness, chronic disease, and quality of life.
Medicaid patients in Columbus may soon have one hospital choice
Medicaid patients in Franklin County may soon have just one choice of a hospital system after OhioHealth and Mount Carmel hospital systems announced plans to end contracts with Medicaid managed-care plan
The Dutch Health System: A Performance Report
The Dutch health care system obliges everyone living in the Netherlands to be insured against health costs. Hence, a basic package of health care is accessible to everybody.

Posted by: Staff on August 08, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-08-07

Perceived Medical Discrimination and Cancer Screening Behaviors of Racial and Ethnic Minority Adults
Researchers find a link between perceived medical discrimination and cancer screening behaviors.
HIV drug resistance found in China's poorest
More than 17 percent of HIV patients being treated for their infection in China developed resistance to available drugs by 2006 and 2007, according to a new nationwide survey.
Hospitals Charged With Using Homeless to Defraud Medicare
One of those stories you have to read to believe.
Ontario doctor uses lotteries to pare down patient list
Doctors in Canada are playing the lottery

Posted by: Staff on August 07, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-08-06

Millions of uninsured with chronic conditions not getting needed services
Most of the uninsured with chronic diseases, the study found, forgo doctor's visits and instead rely solely on emergency room visits for care.
Child health in India, China key to attaining world health goals
Despite stunning economic growth in China and India, child mortality rates remain high amid widening health disparities in the world's two most populous countries, a UN report said Tuesday.
Beckley conference on minority health disparity
The Fourth Minority Health Disparities in Rural Appalachia Conference is scheduled to take place Aug. 7 and 8 in Beckley.

Posted by: Staff on August 06, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-08-05

Picture project helps MetroHealth patients reduce blood pressure
A picture's worth a thousand pills.
School Districts launch diabetes program for Native American Youth
One in three Americans will develop diabetes in their lifetime, and the rate is even higher among American Indians.
Growing Epidemic in Gay and Bisexual Men in the United States
"The new estimates confirm that a vast majority of new infections in the U.S. occur in gay and bisexual men, and that Blacks are significantly more heavily impacted than other racial/ethnic categories. However, the data fail to clearly link the two, perpetuating a longstanding, damaging polarization," explained Walt Senterfitt, CHAMP board co-chair and an epidemiologist living with HIV who served as a Visiting Scientist at CDC's Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention. "We need CDC to clearly show the HIV incidence numbers in gay men and other MSM of color."

Posted by: Staff on August 05, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-08-04

Los Angeles Bars Hospitals from Dumping Homeless Patients
In Los Angeles, a new city ordinance makes it a misdemeanor for health facilities to transport a patient to a place other than his or her residence without written consent, the WSJ reports.
Immigrants Facing Deportation by U.S. Hospitals
What happened next set the stage for a continuing legal battle with nationwide repercussions: Mr. Jiménez was deported — not by the federal government but by the hospital, Martin Memorial.
Care for poor grows heavier for downtown Detroit hospitals
When it comes to the national problem of caring for the rising numbers of uninsured, Detroit is the canary in the coal mine.
Dilemma of declining revenues and patient care
Health providers want to provide quality care and improve patient satisfaction. Really, they do. It's just that pesky problem of declining reimbursements getting in the way of meeting those two key business objectives.

Posted by: Staff on August 04, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-07-31

Posted by: Staff on July 31, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-07-30

  • Data from the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show that a nearly decadelong decline in infant-mortality rates has stalled, and that African-American children are twice as likely as white babies to die before their first birthday.

Posted by: Staff on July 30, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-07-29

Posted by: Staff on July 29, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-07-28

Posted by: Staff on July 28, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-07-24

Posted by: Staff on July 24, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-07-23

  • The reports, one on men's health disparities and the other on the status of women and girls, are both "part of a project we started last year to look at the needs of the community," said Claude-Alix Jacob, the city's chief public health officer. "We want
  • With gas prices hovering around $4 a gallon, my patients are cutting back on medical care. A 59-year-old woman decided not to have a mammogram this year. At her age, she should be screened for colon cancer, too, but she is holding off until she becomes el
  • Jill McGivering investigates if there can be a health system which provides universal access, quality care and a healthier population at an acceptable price. (MP3)
  • Government rhetoric on choice and localism rings hollow in a community where more and more decisions are being taken by agencies in which we have no say.
  • Americans expect that our children will be better off than their parents, and that scientific breakthroughs will eventually conquer disease. Evidence that health care in this country is slipping backward is, therefore, deeply troubling.

Posted by: Staff on July 23, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-07-22

  • When Planned Parenthood representatives began handing out free condoms during an information session with recent Vietnamese immigrants in Orange County last year, a hush fell over the room.
  • representatives from seven South Dakota tribes discussed health issues with Sanford officials and former U.S. House speaker Newt Gingrich. The health disparities research center, which is one of Sanford's five research institutes, works with 27 different
  • "Up until now, previous reports have shown that with non-small cell lung cancer, the differences (between the races) in survival rates may have had something to do with biological differences," Bryant said. "We wanted to evaluate that: Is there really a b

Posted by: Staff on July 22, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-07-21

  • peer nutrition education has a positive influence on diabetes self-management and breastfeeding outcomes, as well as on general nutrition knowledge and dietary intake behaviours, among Latinos in the US.
  • Comparing the way people of different races and incomes get prescriptions may sound like an obscure bit of research.
  • last week the 61-year-old was told he could have the free treatment if he paid Health at Home nurses £1,000 a month to administer it. Mr Clark faces having to come up with the cash if he decides to go ahead.

Posted by: Staff on July 21, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-07-18

  • Global warming will affect the health and welfare of every American, but the poor, elderly, and children will suffer the most, according to a new White House science report released Thursday.
  • Global variation in cancer survival was very wide. 5-year relative survival for breast, colorectal, and prostate cancer was generally higher in North America, Australia, Japan, and northern, western, and southern Europe, and lower in Algeria, Brazil, and

Posted by: Staff on July 18, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-07-17

Posted by: Staff on July 17, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-07-16

  • Lying in her hospital bed, Jeronna Pierre was told the baby girl she carried for eight months had died in her womb. Nine months later, at three months pregnant, she lost a baby again. Pierre, an Aventura resident, is part of a disturbing trend in Miami-Da
  • One of the primary topics of discussion at the NAACP’s 99th Convention, being held this week in Cincinnati, is health disparities affecting the African-American community.

Posted by: Staff on July 16, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-07-14

  • Letting outside auditors scour Medicare bills sure can turn up a lot of overbilling. A pilot program that netted the government nearly $700 million from three states is now being expanded to recover more Medicare money gone astray.
  • Americans forked over $49 billion for pet products and services last year, up $11.5 billion from 2003; other than consumer electronics, pet products are the fastest-growing retail segment.
  • Interesting article on inequality and the need for institutional change.
  • f your provider says that some medication will be helpful to you, it is very important that both you and your provider handle your prescriptions in a responsible way to be sure you are getting what you need. The following steps can help you with your pres

Posted by: Staff on July 14, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-07-11

Posted by: Staff on July 11, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-07-10

Posted by: Staff on July 10, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-07-09

Posted by: Staff on July 09, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-07-08

  • African-American children with mild to moderate kidney disease have worse anemia than their white counterparts, report researchers from the Johns Hopkins Children's Center in what is believed to be the first study of anemia among children with milder fo
  • About one-fifth of Americans live in rural areas, and providing health care to them is a challenge financially and logistically. Only 10 percent of the nation's doctors practice in rural areas, and rural residents tend to be poorer and less likely to have
  • With the release of a study that details how Cambridge men are dying at higher rates than their female counterparts, the Cambridge Public Health Department is moving forward with its programs targeting men’s health.
  • Humphreys’ book indicts many people in power in the government, the Sanitary Commission, and the army for decisions "great and small, careless and deliberate" that doomed thousands of black soldiers to an early grave. The historian’s tale, however, ca

Posted by: Staff on July 08, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-07-07

  • Now through mid-October, a series of ''local conversations'' will take place in Akron and 13 other Ohio communities as part of a national effort to determine the barriers to health-care equality for blacks, as well as Asian-Americans, Native Americans and
  • With the health of Maori in this district showing little improvement, it was time to set a date for equality, said Maori Ora Associates senior health adviser Dr Peter Jansen.
  • Quality improvement rates are lower than widely documented increases in health care spending. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services estimate health care expenditures rose by a 6.7 percent average annual rate over the same period.
  • This paper serves as a blueprint for translating principles for the elimination of racial–ethnic disparities in health care into specific actions that are relevant for individual clinical practices. We describe what is known about reducing racial–ethn

Posted by: Staff on July 07, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-07-03

Posted by: Staff on July 03, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-07-02

Posted by: Staff on July 02, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-07-01

  • Health officials found the overall death rate for males in Cambridge was 34 percent higher than for females. Men also had higher rates of death from heart disease and cancer, as well as a greater chance of becoming infected with HIV/AIDS, according to the
  • Parenting while poor almost always leads to suspicion. At least 60 percent of child-welfare cases in the United States involve solely allegations of neglect, usually for inadequate food, clothing, shelter or inadequate supervision or guardianship. Not sur

Posted by: Staff on July 01, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-06-30

  • A national study conducted by UC Davis researchers reveals that blacks, Asians and Hispanics are less likely to undergo colorectal cancer screening than whites. Among blacks and Hispanics, the disparity in screening appears to be primarily due to socioeco
  • "There is very strong evidence that hospital staff are more likely to suspect drug use on the part of black mothers and these mothers are more likely to have their children removed and put in foster care," said Dorothy Roberts, the Kirkland & Ellis profes

Posted by: Staff on June 30, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-06-27

Posted by: Staff on June 27, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-06-26

  • As it stands, the contours of the national health system are steep and uneven. Health care quality, like education or justice, is one yardstick by which to measure nationhood as designated by functioning national institutions. More should be done by polic
  • Until he was 17, Charles Goodwin spent most of his teen years living with foster families and interacting with caseworkers who never fully understood him for a basic reason: None shared his Native American heritage.
  • [M]embers of the N.C. Commission of Indian Affairs, spoke Wednesday about their work to improve access to education, reduce health disparities, encourage economic development and preserve cultural identity. The American Indian Center at UNC-Chapel Hill or

Posted by: Staff on June 26, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-06-25

Posted by: Staff on June 25, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-06-24

  • How do you navigate the complex U.S. health care system? Easy, you hire a $100,000/year tour guide.
  • "Despite all the worsening economic news we are hearing - from the housing slump, to gas surpassing $4 a gallon, there is some light. We do not have to face a darker economic outlook in health care if we properly address health disparities. That's a cost
  • Determinants of racial/ethnic CRC screening disparities vary among minority groups, suggesting the need for different interventions to mitigate those disparities. Whereas socioeconomic, access, and language barriers seem to drive the CRC screening dispari
  • [John Babb] cited estimates that place the number of medically uninsured Latinos in the United States at around 37 percent. The number of uninsured for the rest of America is at 16 percent. He estimated that only one of 11 Latinos with a mental health dis
  • ..children across the city experienced many improvements in health, economic and educational status during 2006 – yet disparities in health, wealth and opportunity for New York City's young persist between various neighborhoods and ethnicities, accordin
  • Overcrowded hospitals that try to cope with growing patient loads by churning them through more quickly may be helping the spread of drug-resistant germs, Australian researchers

Posted by: Staff on June 24, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-06-23

Posted by: Staff on June 23, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-06-20

  • Overall, the 2,407 people who participated in the $1.2 million program were much sicker than the general population, with higher than normal rates of high blood pressure, asthma, diabetes and other conditions, according to results released by public....
  • In Multnomah County, African-Americans are twice as likely as whites to die from diabetes and two to six times more likely to be diagnosed with a sexually transmitted disease. Across America, 40 percent of black men die prematurely from cardiovascular....
  • Listen to Doctor Anonymous on BlogTalkRadio with Dr. David Loeb who is pediatric cancer doctor. He is author of Doctor Davids Blog. BlogTalkRadio is the leading social radio network with thousands of shows from....
  • Large disparities in young people’s health and health-related behaviours across Europe and North America and strong but complex relationships between adolescent health and the socioeconomic status of families: these are the main findings of a new and....

Posted by: Staff on June 20, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-06-19

Posted by: Staff on June 19, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-06-18

Posted by: Staff on June 18, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-06-17

  • California prison medical release legislation: is it compassionate, or just dumping expensive patients? (Thanks Les Morgan for the lead.)
  • How does your state compare in maternal and childhood health?
  • Nutrition experts say children in low-income families are far more likely to be obese than those from wealthier homes. A study by Dr Jenny O'Dea, associate professor of child health research at the University of Sydney, revealed that childhood obesity is
  • As many of us know, the government-sponsored Medicare health insurance system is running out of funding. The high cost of life-prolonging medical technologies combined with a dramatically increased demand for them (as our population becomes older and sick
  • Every patient-physician relationship is unique. But some research shows that a patient's race can be a particularly strong indicator of how successful some relationships are in achieving treatment goals.
  • Life expectancies for women living in South Carolina’s poorest areas appear to be stagnating or getting shorter. Data collected and examined during a 16-year span (1983-1999) by researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health and the University of Wa

Posted by: Staff on June 17, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-06-16

  • Thirty- eight percent were receiving special education services. In adjusted analyses, Black children were less likely than White children to receive these services (odds ratio [O.R.] = 0.78); among the children in special education, Black children were m
  • Blacks are more likely than whites to die of breast and prostate cancer. Researchers want to know why.
  • ...female veterans aren't getting the same quality of outpatient care as men in about one-third of the VA's 139 facilities that offer it, the report said. That appeared to validate the complaints of advocates and some members of Congress who have said mor
  • For years, doctors have struggled to get some TB patients to take all their medication, which generally involves a six-month regimen of multiple drugs.

    Now a student-led group at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology has developed a way to use cell p




Posted by: Staff on June 16, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-06-13

  • Michael Murphy, a part-time real estate agent and college instructor, has a frank and dismal view of what will happen if the Russian River Dental Clinic no longer accepts Medi-Cal. "My teeth would rot in my skull," said Murphy, a Camp Meeker resident whose jobs don't offer medical benefits.
  • "Continuing the trend for elderly patients over the next few years could cause the emergency care system to collapse," said Mary Pat McKay, MD, of the George Washington University Medical Center in Washington, DC.
  • On examination, Mr L was a chronically ill–appearing man whose breathing was aided by nasal oxygen and who sat on a bedside "neuro" chair. He had a fourth cranial nerve palsy and disconjugate gaze, facial droop, hoarse voice, absent gag reflex, and coar
  • WhiteCoat Rants tells us the answer is, 'A squirrel with mange.' I'm not sure I want to know the question.
  • Did I drink raw milk as a kid? Occasionally, yes. Were my parents super-careful about the cleanliness of the milk? Yes. Did I ever get sick from raw milk? No. Would I give raw milk to my kids? No.
  • Health Wonk Review: Washington Week
  • black Medicare patients in Wisconsin with diabetes and circulation disorders are more likely to have a leg amputated than whites in the state with the same medical conditions, according to a study of Medicare claims commissioned by the Robert Wood Johnson
  • From her Mediterranean-style townhouse, a high school dropout named Rita Campos Ramirez orchestrated what prosecutors call the largest health-care fraud by one person. Over nearly four years, she electronically submitted more than 140,000 Medicare claims

Posted by: Staff on June 13, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-06-12

  • Full transparency is important for the public - and especially the doctors' fellow practitioners in the treatment of children - to judge study results by the doctors who report favorably on the use of antipsychotic drugs that are usually prescribed for adults and have serious side effects.
  • Walgreen’s plans to open retail clinics in Massachusetts is stirring up new controversy over whether such outlets pose a threat to more traditional forms of primary care.
  • The average American is living past age 78, though life spans are still shorter than in other developed countries, according to new data from the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
  • Join us tonight for The Doctor Anonymous Show number 38. Our scheduled guests are from the site called The Doctors Channel. But, still as of this posting, I have not received confirmation that they are indeed coming to the show tonight. So this show shoul
  • Nartey related a story about an African immigrant family who perplexed staff with their insistence that their dying matriarch's swollen leg be drained. Nartey spoke with the family and realized that villagers back home would think the swollen leg had been

Posted by: Staff on June 12, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-06-11

Posted by: Staff on June 11, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-06-10

Posted by: Staff on June 10, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-06-09

Posted by: Staff on June 09, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-06-06

Posted by: Staff on June 06, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-06-05

  • A recently released U.S. government report said that black patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) account for 33 percent of all patients on the kidney transplant wait-list, even though blacks make up only 13 percent of the general population. Blacks
  • The greatest disparity between indigenous and non-indigenous Australians is in rates of coronary heart disease, which are twice as high in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, the report found.
  • while risky sexual activity has become less prevalent among whites and blacks since the biennial survey began in 1991, no change has occurred among Hispanic students.

Posted by: Staff on June 05, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-06-04

  • In the United States between 1950 and 2005 (the last year for which data are available) the death rate from cancer declined by 5 percent, an amount that is mostly due to the decline in cigarette smoking. By contrast the death rate from heart disease fell
  • The risk [of stroke] surges between ages 45 and 54. In those years, women are more than twice as likely as men to have strokes. And at every age, strokes are harder on women — they're more likely than men to wind up physically and mentally impaired.
  • A major report found just 31% of people in need of treatment in low and middle-income countries had access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) in 2007.
  • Massachusetts's ambitious program to move toward universal health insurance nearly halved the number of adults without coverage from about 13 percent to 7 percent in the first year....

Posted by: Staff on June 04, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-06-03

  • The quality of children's health care in America varies widely from state to state, as does their access to insurance and care and the likelihood of living long and healthy lives.
  • For most of these predominantly low-to-middle-income Americans, the underlying problem is not lack of desire for health insurance; rather. their income is insufficient to reasonably afford a health insurance policy or pay its deductible and other out-of-p
  • The number of uninsured adults in Massachusetts fell by almost half last year, says a study released today, while the state's Revenue Department reports that 86,000 people paid a state tax penalty rather than buy insurance.
  • In a country with high out-of-pocket expenditures on health, increasing costs mean the common man has to bear a heavier burden.
  • The first myth that Florida debunks is this: Those without health coverage do not work. Well, Florida, the state that has been leading the nation in job creations over the past few years, has seen its uninsured rate steadily increase from 16.8 percent in

Posted by: Staff on June 03, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-06-02

Posted by: Staff on June 02, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-05-30

Posted by: Staff on May 30, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-05-29

Posted by: Staff on May 29, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-05-28

Posted by: Staff on May 28, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-05-27

Posted by: Staff on May 27, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-05-26

Posted by: Staff on May 26, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading

links for 2008-05-25

  • The equality watchdog has ordered the National Health Service (NHS) to take urgent action to end anti-male discrimination in healthcare.
  • Black men undergo elective AAA repair at a lower rate than white men even after accounting for their decreased disease burden.
  • [P]oor families are up to 22 times more likely to be involved in the child-welfare system than wealthier families. And nationwide, blacks are four times more likely than other groups to live in poverty.
  • Asked how he would address race disparities in education, health care and unemployment, Mr. McCain replied: "First of all, my general overall mission is to continue to erase barriers that are based on race, wherever policies are needed, and of course to i

Posted by: Staff on May 25, 2008
Category: Lunch Break Reading