November 20, 2007

Writing Is Important in Finance?

"I once asked this literary agent what writing paid the best, and he said, 'ransom notes.'" Harry Zimm, Character in the Movie Get Shorty. This is a common question asked by individuals in search of an academic major, and there are two ways to view Zimm’s response. He states that the meaning of letter reveals the “true value” of the material, while also incorporating the sarcastic stance in which payment notes receive the most money. Financial income is usually a prime factor in one’s determining their future profession, but many have neglected to realize that you do not receive money based on a title, but instead are rewarded for your ability to complete tasks better than your competitors. Regardless of your major, success tends to parallel one’s writing ability.

In an interview with Daniel Hildebrandt, an Economics major with a focus in Finance, I discovered a variety of insights about writing in the finance major. Hildebrandt recently completed a cost benefit analysis of a company, which showed a past decision made by a company, and the effect and future effects the decision may have on the company. His goal is to determine if the company should continue their operations or make revisions. Areas of concern for Economists include: how much the company will save financially and materially, the possibility of the decision producing job opportunities, and how the decision may affect society as a whole. The conclusions of economists are rarely completely accurate, or in the words of Hildebrandt, “people tend to think economists are useless because they are required to make too many assumptions.” Many are not realizing economists form logical, researched hypotheses about the decisions of companies. These analyses derived from others’ and the economists’ research may not be totally accurate, but will give a company a general idea on the efficiency of their operations.

Writing is incorporated in the field of Finance from the hiring process through the retirement stage. The ability of an individual to write academic papers and analyze a company’s financial status directly correlates to being hired for internships and eventually full-time jobs, not to mention will enhance an individuals ability to do well academically. An individual must be able to contact future employers or clients through strategies ranging from news pamphlets to detailed analyses of one’s accomplishments (resumes). These tactics are generally learned during undergraduate years, where one will become well acquainted with a variety of styles and resources involved in communication skills. If an individual’s actions (i.e. communication skills, resume) attract positive attention, he or she will develop a network of clients who will be eager to invest.

Although writing may not seem valuable in Finance, it is arguably the most essential tactic in the field. The essential tactics of communication and writing are basic, but with the aid of higher education and experience, an individual can substantially increase their financing abilities. Without the ability to write, one is unable to prove their talents to fellow clients or employers, and may be unable to perform their job effectively.

November 13, 2007

Meaningful Management of Archives

Archiving is one of the most underappreciated tasks in processing history. Without archives one would be unable to prove their stance on any issue. Archives’ value is at the direct expense of time and effort, but without the proper archiving knowledge, one’s work may be worthless. Due to a lack of quality archivists, locating an efficiently organized collection of archives may be difficult, but University Circle encompasses several sites, including The Dittrick Medical History Center.

The Dittrick Medical History Center, “holds archives, information written by individuals and organizations that are usually unpublished, for Cleveland Medical facilities and personnel.” A few categories of files that are held in the center are blueprints of The Cleveland Clinic in the 1900’s and employment data of hospitals. The Dittrick has developed a series of archiving steps that have proved to be useful and efficient. Initially the archives are arranged in chronological or other identifiable orders. The next step for archivists is the “description step” in which all archives are summarized and made accessible to researchers. The three main subdivisions of the description step are introduction and biographical notes which synopsize the material, scope and content notes which assist future archivists to understand the materials, and container correspondence which enables researches to quickly find their desired materials. This process is not only useful to the archivist because it provides a detailed procedure for them to follow, but it is incredibly valuable to researchers who desire to find information within the Dittrick.

How are historical facts and events chosen to represent a time period? Archivists attempt to find examples that intersect a variety of interests; therefore, the archive would minimize storage space and maximize critical information. Percy Skuy, “a tireless innovator and contributor to the pharmaceutical industry,” assembled a detailed exhibit that has been put on display at the Dittrick Medical Research Center (The Chronicle of Healthcare Marketing). This exhibit combines over 650 objects with brief explanations of each (The History of Contraceptives). The explanations range from simple descriptions to engaging stories of these unique contraceptives. An object may seem basic, but after reading one may find it to be very unique.


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The opportunity to speak with knowledgeable archivists was informative, and made me appreciate historical data much more. Now having a slight idea of the effort that takes place in finding and processing archives inspires me to utilize resources that are available to me, such as The Dittrick. The point that intrigued me was when the professor stated, “Curators do not need to know everything, but instead need to know where to find it.” This proves true with all writing, but is deliberately illustrated with archiving. Archivists and researchers, especially amateurs, must be willing to fulfill the required steps in order to excel in their project.


October 05, 2007

Though Thoughtful, Still Illegal

What do we classify as writing in Cleveland? Is it material that is in Cleveland and not found anywhere else, or is it found everywhere including Cleveland? Regardless of the material, the importance of writing in Cleveland is to reveal information to others about the city. This is found in simple examples, such as: the garage sale poster that was labeled 9 am until 2 pm on Saturday or the detour signs that allow you to navigate around road construction. Specifying the time of the garage sale allows interested customers to arrange the garage sale into their day, and the detour sign may allow an individual who is running late to a meeting to arrive on time. Writing has the ability, if analyzed correctly, to make life more efficient.

A more interesting style of writing in Cleveland is graffiti. This is usually a creative work used to express opinion. These writings can be very crafty or plain, but both ways are written to develop an idea. My research led me upon two sayings, which are: “free the g” (written on an RTA window) and “Sept. 11 Gone but not forgotten” (pbase.com). The first phrase is more individualized and states that the writer wants to get his acquaintance out of jail. This is not directly stated so it is tough to analyze thoroughly who “the g” is or why he or she is restricted. This message brings a feeling of comfort to the writer and supporters of “the g” through a tiny piece of writing. The supporters feel as if they have common interests and in response are willing to support each other throughout the issue. The “Sept. 11” piece has a broader prospective because it applies to all Americans, especially those directly affected. This artwork symbolizes faith of America that we will never fail to remember the event and we, as Americans, will defend our “home.” Although these artworks are very distinct, they both attempt to bring people together in support of an issue. Usually graffiti walls with words are more affective in establishing a supporting cast, but unique and thoughtful illustrations can generate support as well.

Sept 11 Never forgotten.jpg

This so called “artwork” is catchy and supportive, but it also has another very important characteristic. It is vandalism, which is illegal in the United States. It is strange that something that is considered a piece of art and has a positive effect on people is illegal, but it is. Graffiti makes poor, rundown neighborhoods more lively and charismatic. Why would anyone be against this? Graffiti is down graded by immature, rebellious individuals who write cruel and inappropriate scenes.

My presumption is that when talented artists with suitable ideas are questioned about their passion to break the law to express artwork, many of their answers will be similar. They will speak of an adrenaline rush and a feeling of being free. A feeling that is long searched for but rarely found. The fact that individuals can create such elaborate pieces of work in the dark, to avoid lawful authorities, is amazing. I encourage those creative, heart warming artists to keep their works appropriate, but to not authority stop them from their passion.

September 28, 2007

Two of a Kind or Two Distinct?

Two of a Kind or Two Distinct?

Case Western has a variety of writing displays. Whether it is assigned or personal it serves a specific purpose. Which brings me to my question, are virtual and physical writing similar, and/ or do they ever work in unison to accomplish an idea?

Physical writing consists of the every day signs and drawings we see walking to and from class or events. Usually these catchy, informal pieces of information flow together. For example, during rush weeks the sidewalks were covered with fraternity events and the billboard, on the backside of thwing, was guaranteed to be engulfed in paint revealing similar information. A topic we have once discussed in class was a billboard reading, “Party like a rockstar behind Wade.” Although the slogan proved to be inaccurate, it was still intriguing and was a proven success based on the attendance at the event. The billboard might not be the reason someone attends an event, but it may be the source of their knowledge. Also, the cork board on the other side of Thwing reveals many service opportunities and job openings on or near campus. This benefits all individuals who are seeking knowledge on related topics. It is helpful when information is available in one spot, as oppose to constantly searching for new sources of information.

Virtual writing on the other hand is a more formal, structured type of writing here at Case. An individual can usually rely on virtual writing to be fixed, as oppose to physical writing on campus which is continuously changing. Virtual writing, commonly thought of as the internet and its’ related sources, has countless options via the click of a button. Students, who rarely have an abundance of time during the week, find the Case website very useful. Students can check email, locate buildings on campus, check their schedule, and complete a variety of other tasks extremely efficiently. Virtual writing is a more descriptive sort of text.

Although physical and virtual writing are two distinct genres of expressing thought, they are similar in many ways. Both genres are assisted by and/ or created by students, group leaders, faculty, and other authoritative positions. The most fascinating of all similarities is how both physical and virtual writing relate to each other. The Wade arrows that are still on the ground from Welcome Days, direct students and visitors to a building in which they might have had a difficult time finding by themselves. The most popular physical genre on the sidewalk is “search on google: Who’s Ron Paul.” In my research I found that Ron Paul is a Congressman who is seeking a presidential nomination in the year 2008. This is a thoughtful and precise strategy in advertising. The effectiveness of this strategy is displayed during classes when students are reading about Ron Paul and visiting his site. Physical writing is useful in establishing ideas, but if curiosity still persists about the subject, an individual will utilize his or her virtual sources to further their research.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=za78ZGmVErs&eurl=http%3A%2F%2Fwww%2Eronpaul2008%2Ecom%2F

September 20, 2007

A Way of Expression

A Way of Expression

The painful art of tattooing has become more common as the years have gone by. The thought that an individual needs to express him or herself so badly that he or she is willing to endure pain on their own body is intriguing to me. When the expression of word or actions is not enough, one may turn to tattooing to convey their message permanently. Permanently inking one’s self may seem extreme, but to an individual it may be the best possible measure of expression. The time and planning that are involved in this art convey the significance the image or text may have on the individual.

Significance is a very interesting topic in tattooing. One may think that a permanently inked pictured of an object is uncreative and pointless, but to the individual who is tattooed it may symbolize a value or treasure in his or her life. The thought that you might never know what a person is trying to express through their art, without talking to them, is interesting to me. Two individuals may have the same artwork on their bodies but the images may symbolize to distinct and unique ideas.

A friend of mine has invested his resources into a permanent ink drawing. He suggests that the artwork symbolizes his mom’s strength in being a two time defeat of breast cancer. He adds that his tattoo is encouraging anyone who has come across cancer to “keep fighting the good fight.” My friend has gone beyond the thought of self and has incorporated the feelings of others, such as his mother and all other cancer fighters, into a small picture on his body. A tattoo in this case carries much more magnitude because it goes beyond the individual. A person who is contemplating body art should invest his or her time, money, and body into something presentable that will always have significant meaning to them and possibly others.

Pat Coleman Breast cancer tatoo.jpg


When does a tattooing transform from crafty to excessive and stereotypical “show offs”? Stereotypical tattooing involves countless pieces of art in one area. This results in an inability to clearly distinguish a person’s view. An individual may have a variety of creative and meaningful tattoos that are ruined due to an inability to space and organize feelings. People are trying to express themselves through art, but due to unnecessary clustering, all of their ideas are misunderstood. If the objective is to express yourself, why would you make the art so difficult to understand? Just keep it simple!

Even prisoners have learned to keep their jail tattoos clear-cut. A very common tattoo in prison is a tear drop under the eye. It is said to represent, “a wearer who: has committed a murder, had family or friends die while they were incarcerated, and is a convicted child molester” (Break the Code- Tear Drop). This simple tattoo has a variety of meanings, but all of them relate to pain felt by the prisoner or someone the prisoner has affected.

tear drop tattoo.jpg


When it comes to tattoos “, the decision is between looking nice versus showing off” (Soyland 225). The decision may seem easy, but to some there seems to be no difference.

September 15, 2007

Life on the Walls (With Pics)

Life on the Walls

There are numerous amounts of text that each Case student passes by each day. Whether he or she notices these writings is the topic at hand. The variety includes bulletins, posters, and, the least noticed of all, rules. Most of the writings affect students in different ways. Some students may stop to read a few on occasion, while others may never read them but know that they are there just in case the day comes when the information in the text may be valuable. The resident advisors are structured with hallway information, but students are encouraged to make their rooms as unique or homey as needed.

Pictures, as discussed in a previous class, are fading to a more informal classification with a majority of them being of friends as opposed to family. This shows me that the bonds of family are declining and the importance of friends and other relationships is on the rise with our generation. This is a definite American trend that is spreading quickly throughout the country. I feel the growing importance of friends is significant, but it is sad to see how invaluable the idea of family is to some students. In their defense, students may have had a rough childhood and may be looking to start over with a new community of relationships. As long as a student has support in a time of adversity is the main issue of this concern.

The most common way to express your self in your dorm room is by posters. Posters have a unique way of displaying ones variety of interests through words and picture. On my floor, there is a room that consists of a variety of posters. The two most meaningful are Martin Luther King Jr. “I have a dream” and Led Zeppelin “stairway to heaven. Each poster has two distinct meanings and can be understood in a variety of ways. The Martin Luther King Jr. poster might indicate that he or she is proud of their heritage or it might be honoring the greatest speech of all time. Led Zeppelin’s “Stairway to Heaven” may be indicating a preference in music or even possibly even state a religious idea that he or she may be interested in heaven.

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The variety of texts and even more meanings makes each room and residence hall unique, but not always are the posters and other texts a distinct symbol of who lives in the dorm. Sometimes these pieces can be very misleading, such as a Bart Simpson poster that is hanging because the person doesn’t want their room to be plain and it was the only poster left at the poster sale, or a picture of The Little Mermaid in another residences room that makes him think of his little sister. Hopefully this piece will make you think before you judge someone based on the pieces hanging in their room, and even persuade you to hang something in your room that is out of the ordinary.

September 14, 2007

Life on the Walls

Life on the Walls

There are numerous amounts of text that each Case student passes by each day. Whether he or she notices these writings is the topic at hand. The variety includes bulletins, posters, and, the least noticed of all, rules. Most of the writings affect students in different ways. Some students may stop to read a few on occasion, while others may never read them but know that they are there just in case the day comes when the information in the text may be valuable. The resident advisors are structured with hallway information, but students are encouraged to make their rooms as unique or homey as needed.
Pictures, as discussed in a previous class, are fading to a more informal classification with a majority of them being of friends as opposed to family. This shows me that the bonds of family are declining and the importance of friends and other relationships is on the rise with our generation. This is a definite American trend that is spreading quickly throughout the country. I feel the growing importance of friends is significant, but it is sad to see how invaluable the idea of family is to some students. In their defense, students may have had a rough childhood and may be looking to start over with a new community of relationships. As long as a student has support in a time of adversity is the main issue of this concern.
The most common way to express your self in your dorm room is by posters. Posters have a unique way of displaying ones variety of interests through words and picture. On my floor, there is a room that consists of a variety of posters. The two most meaningful are Martin Luther King Jr. “I have a dream” and Led Zeppelin “stairway to heaven. Each poster has two distinct meanings and can be understood in a variety of ways. The Martin Luther King Jr. poster might indicate that he or she is proud of their heritage or it might be honoring the greatest speech of all time. Led Zeppelin’s “Stairway to Heaven” may be indicating a preference in music or even possibly even state a religious idea that he or she may be interested in heaven.
The variety of texts and even more meanings makes each room and residence hall unique, but not always are the posters and other texts a distinct symbol of who lives in the dorm. Sometimes these pieces can be very misleading, such as a Bart Simpson poster that is hanging because the person doesn’t want their room to be plain and it was the only poster left at the poster sale, or a picture of The Little Mermaid in another residences room that makes him think of his little sister. Hopefully this piece will make you think before you judge someone based on the pieces hanging in their room, and even persuade you to hang something in your room that is out of the ordinary.